Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand  (Read 31533 times)

reed

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #405 on: 2021-05-08, 04:21:42 AM »
That's a pretty good haul for sure, they can certainly produce. A friend here tries to grow the biggest individual ones he can and there are varieties know for making really big ones. I think his record is around 5 kg for a single root, not sure how many of those he gets from a single plant.

I call those great big ones clunkers and select against them as I like lots of smaller ones in range of .5kg or even less over just a couple giant ones. I generally get maybe 1.5 to 2 kg. per plant growing in the little pots or drastically overcrowded tubs like I do. Gonna test actual production this year in larger and less crowded pots and in ground.

That's sure some interesting colors on those in the picture. Looks like they are white on the inside. How are they flavor wise?

Richard Watson

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #406 on: 2021-05-08, 11:56:04 PM »
Interesting looking tubers Chris.
How much seed did he manage to get?
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

Chris Morrison

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #407 on: 2021-05-09, 12:33:25 AM »
Hi Richard. Mike didnt really gather seed, he had a shambles of growth, but wow some yield!
I also took eye off ball - Garlic biz booming - but did get 150 odd seed, harvested after frost mid Apr (no time to harvest daily like last year)
And, to be truthful, was annoyed that all last years work harvesting 400 seed, gave us 40 at best seedlings?
Anyways, I did get an Okinawan plant to seed, pretty happy bout that, hopefully crossed with my EFR?
EFR has proven up to 3X yield of NZ Owairaka Red, firmer flesh, sweeter, but skin more prone to harvest damage / scuffing?
Will likey throw a PVR around it, if convinced it has stopped mutating?
Mark - yes those camotes from Mike in Great Barrier Island are the best eaters of camotes, but not up to Owairaka Red or EFR firmness or taste, although this years crop yet to be tasted.
Cheers

reed

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #408 on: 2021-05-09, 03:36:11 AM »
Forty out of 400 isn't bad, the very first time I had seeds I think I had about 25 and out of those if I remember right, I got 3 seedlings and one of those died.

If what I found in research is true they will never really stop mutating, it's just what they do. Supposedly it happens most in the first few seasons after a new one starts from seed but can happen anytime. There are more than 200 "heirloom" varieties for sale in the US and again if the research is true most of those are a product of mutation. Some stuff I've read says that after years or decades, when mutation finally does stop is when vigor and production starts declining.

There is one called Puerto Rico that comes in half a dozen different named variations, and even if you buy it under the same name from two different growers they might be different. It used to be our favorite flavor wise but none of the different versions have ever flowered for me. Some of mine though, are now as good or better than it so I guess it worked out. 

I view the mutation as a good thing. I think any particular plant has tons of genetic diversity locked inside it and the mutation is a way of bringing it out so even if you only have a few kinds to start with, once you have seeds those variations start to come out. The standard here is that they have to clone true for three years to be considered a new stable kind. I'm not sure what that really means though. For example if you have a root that sprouts two different kinds, one like the root one one different, does the process start over or can you just ignore the different one? I didn't really believe the mutation thing until I saw it with my onw eyeballs.

What are EFR and PVR?
« Last Edit: 2021-05-09, 03:39:51 AM by reed »

Andrew Barney

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #409 on: 2021-06-08, 08:22:53 AM »
There are almost too many separate sweet potato seed threads that it is hard to keep up to date. Would be nice if you all had one master thread.

Hopefully someday I will have seeds to grow, but sounds like that may still be several years off.

Is there no way to get seeds from Kumara? I was reading about Edmonds cookbook of Kiwi cuisine after watching the latest dark cake recipe from Glen and Friends cooking on YouTube. Someone said Kumara is not just a sweet potato,  but an epic sweet potato.

But that got me thinking that surely those of you that live down under might have vastly different sweet potato germplasm than we do here in the states.

It also makes me wonder what germplasm one could get from the CIP potato genebank in Peru.

reed

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #410 on: 2021-06-08, 08:31:05 AM »
There are almost too many separate sweet potato seed threads that it is hard to keep up to date. Would be nice if you all had one master thread.

Hopefully someday I will have seeds to grow, but sounds like that may still be several years off.

Is there no way to get seeds from Kumara? I was reading about Edmonds cookbook of Kiwi cuisine after watching the latest dark cake recipe from Glen and Friends cooking on YouTube. Someone said Kumara is not just a sweet potato,  but an epic sweet potato.

But that got me thinking that surely those of you that live down under might have vastly different sweet potato germplasm than we do here in the states.

It also makes me wonder what germplasm one could get from the CIP potato genebank in Peru.

I kind of like having the separate threads.  As far as when seeds may be available it might be years but more like very few, certainly not several. 

whwoz

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #411 on: 2021-06-09, 12:03:08 AM »
There are almost too many separate sweet potato seed threads that it is hard to keep up to date. Would be nice if you all had one master thread.

Hopefully someday I will have seeds to grow, but sounds like that may still be several years off.

Is there no way to get seeds from Kumara? I was reading about Edmonds cookbook of Kiwi cuisine after watching the latest dark cake recipe from Glen and Friends cooking on YouTube. Someone said Kumara is not just a sweet potato,  but an epic sweet potato.

But that got me thinking that surely those of you that live down under might have vastly different sweet potato germplasm than we do here in the states.

It also makes me wonder what germplasm one could get from the CIP potato genebank in Peru.

I too like having different threads for SP breeding, makes it easier to track what is happening in the various countries without getting progress from one line mixed up with another line, and when one area has a quite year it is easier to pick up again to continue progress.

As far as Oz goes, most of our germplasm has most likely originated from the USA, certainly what we see in the South East would have its origins there.

Richard Watson

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Re: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote - New Zealand
« Reply #412 on: 2021-06-17, 02:59:42 PM »
There are almost too many separate sweet potato seed threads that it is hard to keep up to date. Would be nice if you all had one master thread.



Is there no way to get seeds from Kumara? I was reading about Edmonds cookbook of Kiwi cuisine after watching the latest dark cake recipe from Glen and Friends cooking on YouTube. Someone said Kumara is not just a sweet potato,  but an epic sweet potato.

But that got me thinking that surely those of you that live down under might have vastly different sweet potato germplasm than we do here in the states.
 
Chris correct me if I am wrong here but I believe the original strains first bought to these lands where introduced by the first to arrive, they being Ngati Hotu who became known as the 'red headed Maori', DNA has proven they were of Aztec decent they were likely driven out of South America by the Spanish, settling on Easter Island, later arriving here. Those early strain were apparently spindly and yielded poorly. When the Polynesian Maori invaded 100's of years later they were replaced with more productive strains originating from SE Asia


A interesting documentary on the Ngati Hotu as they later became known and how there history has been deliberately being concealed 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBFpGayPATs
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle