Tomato - eager to grow

Started by Diane Whitehead, 2022-11-24, 11:46:13 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

Diane Whitehead

I'm saving seeds of some of my tomatoes. 

Make My Day, by Tom Wagner, produced only one tomato, and when I started to squeeze the seeds out, there were wee green bits - most of the seeds had already germinated.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

William Schlegel

That is fun! Make My Day seems like it is a rare variety now.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

UnicornEmily

Do you have any seeds that haven't germinated yet that you can save?

If those are all you've got, and it's a rare variety, I'd make space on my desk for some pots and start those seeds under my grow light right away.  (Wry grin.)

Diane Whitehead

Yes. I have quite a few seeds left as I sow only two or three seeds.  I grow about 100 types of tomatoes each year, so one plant of each usually provides plenty of tomatoes for me.

A number produced only a single fruit this year, though, so it is good that others produced a lot.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

UnicornEmily

Oh, good!

Wow, that's a lot of different kinds of tomatoes!

Only one fruit doesn't sound very productive.  How often does that happen?

Diane Whitehead

I have over 500 kinds of tomato seeds and choose a different selection to grow each year.

Plants with only one tomato happen rarely and I then usually stick that package in the garbage.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

William Schlegel

My tomato seed collection grew quite a bit last winter. I tend to plant four seeds of a variety when I just want to try it. Tomato seeds live about 14 years. I still don't have 500 though! Maybe half if that.

I find lots of tomato varieties grow reasonably well here but a few really belong to some other climate and don't so I also get the odd really unproductive plant when growing out my collection.

The tomatoes bred here by me do pretty well.   

I tried to grow too many kinds last year.

This coming year I want to focus more. Maybe just grow those I'm considering for crosses. Grow less overall but more of my own new crosses.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

darjones

I've grown well over 2000 varieties over the years but only maintain about 500 in my seed stash.  By "maintain" I mean the varieties that I grow and produce seed.  I have at least 1000 more that are kept for historic reasons.  Many were used in crosses I made years ago.

I have about 200 varieties of tomatoes and 70 of peppers in seed trays on the light stand.

Garrett Schantz

Probably could've started some tomato seeds a bit earlier. Doing so, fairly soon.

There's a decent sized start time for them here. Still figuring out proper start times.


I'll probably be growing some things to save / share seed.

Polar Beauty, Polar Star, Double Rich, Burnley Bounty, Jamfi Cherry Tomato, Island Sunrise tomato, Oscar Pearson Hard Fruit - probably some varieties only found on J&L Gardens site as well.

Island Sunrise was bred by Small Island Seed Company. Haven't seen it much elsewhere. Supposedly is a - Cheesmanii X L. Pimpinellifolium X L. Esculentum. Though it's been in development for 9 years, I'm sure everyone gets suspicious when they hear about Galapagos crosses or whether people used the correct type.

I'd say it's a neat variety.


Oscar Pearson Hard Fruit was grown from The Experimental Farm Network from the USDA if I remember correctly. There's like two other Pearson bred tomatoes floating around as well. Whatever the case probably hard to find.

Burnley Bounty is from Australia. It has wild genetics, which is why I purchased it. It's actually "a late fruiting variety". As in, it's daylength sensitive with its flowering. Seems to be somewhat common or well known in Australia. Managed to get seed from a site that imported a bunch of different varieties of beans, tomatoes and other things from Australia, Germany, Africa and some other places - parent company is based in Africa.

Double Rich is just interesting.

I don't know anything about "Jamfi Cherry Tomato". I found the seed packet stuffed away and it says free seed on it. Not 100% on where I even got it as free seed from, I wanna say it was an Etsy seller? If it's the one I think it is, they imported all sorts of cucumber seed and other things from other countries. Didn't purchase it, so I can't check any logs.



Adrian

#9
Quote from: Diane Whitehead on 2022-11-26, 10:25:52 AMI have over 500 kinds of tomato seeds and choose a different selection to grow each year.

Plants with only one tomato happen rarely and I then usually stick that package in the garbage.
plants with only one tomato give often the mosts tasty tomatos.I cross thoses tomatos with tomatos more early or productives or vigorous.The f1 give often very goods surprises.

Steph S

I have really fallen down on the OP seed conservation work since breeding has taken up my tomato space. Now if I squeeze in an OP or two it's often because I want to cross with them or else I need to refresh the seed stock of something we've already trialed and found useful for the short season here. Sometimes it's a 'standard' for earliness or a parent of a cross to compare with the downstream.   Some years I have squeezed in a new unknown to me tomato as well.  But it's hard when they end up fighting for a bit of space, you don't really know if they got a proper chance.
I have a couple of binders full of OP's we trialed and some more that didn't even get a grow yet.  It's a good thing that tomato seeds last such a long time.  There are some at least that I'm genuinely eager to grow, but... well maybe next year.