Author Topic: Graft chimeras  (Read 109 times)

Andrew Barney

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 528
  • Karma: 43
  • Northern Colorado, Semi-Arid Climate, USA
    • Pea Breeding, Watermelon x Citron-melon, Purple Foliage Corn, Wild Tomatoes
    • View Profile
    • My blog
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfc / Dfb
  • Hardiness Zone: 5b
« Last Edit: 2021-07-04, 09:28:01 AM by Andrew Barney »

Adrian

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 217
  • Karma: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Graft chimeras
« Reply #1 on: 2021-07-12, 04:10:35 PM »
Very interessant what much probability this event has to arrived?
What can arrived if i sow the seeds of those fruits?
« Last Edit: 2021-07-12, 04:17:25 PM by Adrian »

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 75
  • Karma: 11
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Cfa
  • Hardiness Zone: 7
Re: Graft chimeras
« Reply #2 on: 2021-07-12, 07:47:46 PM »
The Japanese have made the most progress on graft chimeras, with some very interesting results.  They made the in plantae method much more efficient that Winklers cleft graft.  The technique was developed in Citrus, and is called Direction-Hormone-Slowlygrowing (DHS).  Winkler’s graft was like 1/100 success, while DHS is 1/6 (!!!).  DHS uses an approach grafted seedlings, with a 60 degree cut on one hypocotyl, then application of hormones.  The “slowly growing” part has to do with chimera selection, they are slower to shoot at first than non chimeras. 

Check out the cassava chimera research from Brazil too.  It’s also much more efficient than Winkler, and consists of a whip graft with the application of NAA.

The Japanese have also much efficient in vitro methods for graft chimera synthesis.  The research was done in brassicas, and is very interesting.  It essentially involves two seedlings of different colors, micrografting with and then culturing the graft union.

Adrian the answer to your question is, first the chimera flowers may or may not be sterile.  If they can form seed, research has shown that the progeny can have novel sequences. 
« Last Edit: 2021-07-12, 08:09:00 PM by Chance »

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 75
  • Karma: 11
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Cfa
  • Hardiness Zone: 7
Re: Graft chimeras
« Reply #3 on: 2021-07-12, 08:03:22 PM »
Whip graft + NAA method.  What’s wild if you look at the papers on this is the epigenetic effect on the roots.  It brings to light a fascinating aspect of chimera breeding—the epigenetic layer.  It’s interesting because cassava makes true roots, in this case they should be non swollen like the wild parent.  This is because the true roots are coming only from the inner layer of tissue.  But they are swollen, so the effects aren’t necessarily easily predictable based upon our understanding of which genome is occupying which layer.
« Last Edit: 2021-07-12, 08:10:59 PM by Chance »

Andrew Barney

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 528
  • Karma: 43
  • Northern Colorado, Semi-Arid Climate, USA
    • Pea Breeding, Watermelon x Citron-melon, Purple Foliage Corn, Wild Tomatoes
    • View Profile
    • My blog
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfc / Dfb
  • Hardiness Zone: 5b
Re: Graft chimeras
« Reply #4 on: 2021-07-12, 09:59:25 PM »
Very interesting.

I was thinking it would be best to do these grafts in the seedling stage.

My thinking was that adult trees have a more developed immune system, so if you wanted to do very wide grafting like apple and pear and didn't want the graft to fail after a certain number of years that you need the plant immune system to adapt early on in its life.

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 75
  • Karma: 11
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Cfa
  • Hardiness Zone: 7
Re: Graft chimeras
« Reply #5 on: 2021-07-13, 12:20:40 PM »
Very interesting.

I was thinking it would be best to do these grafts in the seedling stage.

My thinking was that adult trees have a more developed immune system, so if you wanted to do very wide grafting like apple and pear and didn't want the graft to fail after a certain number of years that you need the plant immune system to adapt early on in its life.

To my understanding, there is truth to that.  An even greater potential graft compatibility is opened up when using hybrid seedlings.