Author Topic: Viola Breeding  (Read 313 times)

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #15 on: 2021-05-17, 11:12:18 AM »
Assuming your climate thing is accurate, both of you.  Odorata is officially supposed to like zones 4-9 (which would mean all of us would be fine) but I haven't seen a catalog that hasn't advised zone 7 or higher (well, as I said, I have seen some that said six but only for selected cultivars)

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #16 on: 2021-05-17, 03:11:20 PM »
A lot of odorata types can handle cold climates pretty well.

From what I have read, the clumping/mounding types are hardier.

But most places sell a sub-species from a warmer area - doesn't spread as easily, doesn't really clump.

Could hybridize the fancy non cold hardy types with the clump forming types.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #17 on: 2021-05-17, 05:40:02 PM »
Figured I would mention - the violets I have here are probably V. sororia as there isn't a scent.

Found some more pale violets close to where I found the others.

The ones that I moved haven't flowered again yet. But the leaves are growing / alive. Probably going to return in Fall.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #18 on: 2021-05-18, 10:48:35 AM »
These are my local wild violas. Leaf and flowers are highly edible. They grow profusely under the maples in the drylands, and more sparsely throughout the sagebrush shrublands.

The lanceolate leaves are fairly diagnostic for Viola nuttallii. Though the whole population aren't lanceolate.
« Last Edit: 2021-05-18, 11:11:35 AM by Joseph Lofthouse »

reed

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #19 on: 2021-05-18, 07:55:38 PM »
The yellow ones are lovely. I have seen them around here on very rare occasions, unfortunately I can't remember where. 

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #20 on: 2021-05-18, 08:04:14 PM »
I haven't saw any yellows where I live. They look nice. Might try growing some eventually. Wonder how a Confederate Violet would look crossed with a yellow type.

reed

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #21 on: 2021-05-19, 03:43:16 AM »
I just noticed that this violet topic is under legumes. I didn't know that about violets.

I still speculate that  the ones called Confederate and all the other various color shades of the sororia type are just variations of the same thing due to quantitative expression of the genes for color. If you can find some pure white ones to mix with pure dark purple ones and grow them as a grex, all the possible shades and combinations will show up. At least that is what I see in my general area.

My own yard is short on the pure white. That's how it was with my asters and dame's rocket too but with them I tag any pure white and make sure their seeds get special attention. Still with them there are years where the pure white is missing but then it shows back up unexpectedly. It might be easier with violets as they are nearly evergreen perennials all I'd have to do is pamper some white ones. The dame's rocket and asters are also perennial but any individual pant only lives a few seasons. I wish my violets were in bloom right now so I could get some photos.

Do you think they would cross easily with the yellow ones? The leaves on those in Joseph's pictures look much different and the flowers seem to be missing that fuzzy part in the center. 

« Last Edit: 2021-05-19, 03:45:44 AM by reed »

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #22 on: 2021-05-19, 05:57:54 AM »
I just noticed that this violet topic is under legumes. I didn't know that about violets.

They aren't. This thread branched off of a legume thread, and no one has moved it (or there is no way to move it) out of the subject. Violets belong to, well, the Violet family, Violacae.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #23 on: 2021-05-19, 08:11:51 AM »
Yikes! Sorry. That's one of the problems of organizing the site by taxonomy, administered by an admin with zero formal training in botany!!! The admins have tools to easily move the thread to a more appropriate location on the site.

As far as I know, we have one thread about the Violaceae family, and few if any from the entire order to which it belongs. Violas are more closely related to willows, flax, and kiwi than to legumes.

One of the themes of my growing, is that I want to feed myself from as many different families as possible. Knowing that viola is in it's own family, makes it a higher priority crop to me.

reed

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #24 on: 2021-05-19, 10:36:25 AM »
Well, what ever ya call it I'm down another rabbit hole now. Already picked out a spot to start transplanting all the best violets I come across. Hardest part of establishing a nice violet patch from past experience is keeping the nasty grass weeds out of it but that's true with lots of things.

The patch I had in town years ago was in heavy shade under a big oak tree and the violets had the upper hand there, all I really had to do was stop mowing it.  They do great as weeds in my garden so they apparently like full sun too. The spot I have picked out now is also in considerable shade but based on those in the sunny garden I think soil quality might be the biggest factor in how large and lush they grow.


Garrett Schantz

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #25 on: 2021-05-19, 01:50:37 PM »
The best place for violets without competition in my yard would be in a wooded area. The only other things that grow up there would be chickweed in early spring, a bit of pokeweed, woodland lettuce, rubus species, strawberries. Not getting mowed over probably helps quite a bit.

I am unsure if the yellow types would be fertile with purple types or not. It is possible, wouldn't hurt to try. Most viola breeding focuses on types from outside of North America.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Viola Breeding
« Reply #26 on: 2021-05-28, 04:33:53 PM »
I am reading 100 Vegetables and Where They Came From by William Woys Weaver.

He describes how he likes to eat a lettuce called Salade de Russie, which does well in winter, mixed with cresses, red radicchios, rockets and other slightly bitter greens.  Then he garnishes with "large fragrant Russian violets, especially the old variety called Czar.  They are pale blue and bloom in cold frames from September to May."
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil