Author Topic: Is it too late for habrochaites?  (Read 238 times)

ImGrimmer

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Is it too late for habrochaites?
« on: 2021-05-04, 11:40:36 AM »
Is it already too late to sow habrochaites, peruvianum and chmielewskii ?

William S.

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #1 on: 2021-05-04, 06:17:48 PM »
I think so for habrochaites, though I got a new packet of Habrochaites yesterday. Maybe I should plant ten seeds. I want to keep them seperate though from the other accessions. Maybe I can plant them in a pot and bury the pot then dig it up in the fall. That might lessen the transplant shock and allow me to isolate. Dubious procedure though not that hopeful for ripe fruit. Though I am speaking for Western MT USA.

Chmielewskii I am not qualified to render an opinion.

Peruvianum I would still plant especially if you've grown it a few times.

If in doubt you could grow them in pots, then come frost bring them in.
« Last Edit: 2021-05-04, 06:42:23 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #2 on: 2021-05-04, 08:12:07 PM »
The Neandermato habrochaites should be fine as it's relatively early. Other habrochaites might be pushing it - depends on your zone.

My peruvianums all got scorched and died last year, didn't harden them off well enough with the heat wave - an ungerminated seed decided to sprout, eventually flowered. No fruits due to being the only plant though. I would say Joseph's peruvianum is probably even earlier.

Chmielewskii types usually take awhile from other experiences I have read about. I would try some in pots if you are able.

William S.

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #3 on: 2021-05-04, 09:25:55 PM »
Joseph's peruvianum I expect I could walk out the front door tomorrow and plant it direct seeded and get viable seed back. I would however simulate a 1" rain event if necessary around the date of average last frost which for me is May 15th.

Joseph's Habrochaites: interesting thought. Last year I successfully direct seeded some mostly habrochaites phenotype but 75% domestics. They produced viable seed. I had to stop myself from seed saving it as it just wasn't in the same league as the other 75% domestics. So really I think successful direct seeding of Neandermato now would potentially help segregate out introgressions from short season domestics from back cross events. It might also help segregate out cold / frost tolerance. Perhaps a worthwhile experiment? Joseph sent me a huge envelope of Neandermato last year and I have quite a bit of seed saved. Might be worth attempting with ~ 1/2 of it?  Though also potentially interesting with Back Cross habrochaites cytoplasm seed.
« Last Edit: 2021-05-04, 09:36:55 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

ImGrimmer

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #4 on: 2021-05-05, 12:02:39 AM »
Thanks for your help!
I ordered several accessions from the German gene bank. so I guess they can be pretty much anything.
it would be a shame to lose everything because there is not enough time. on the other hand, next year is a long time away....

William S.

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #5 on: 2021-05-06, 10:22:26 PM »
I planted ten seeds of a new strain of habrochaites today. Used the 50% bleach for 30 minutes protocol. Will see. Also planted three microdwarfs, krainiy sever (found my only seedling with a rotten stem today), and Lizzano F1. TGRC's website said they use the same protocol on domestics so I bleached them as well, but not for as long. Should lead to rapid germination.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

ImGrimmer

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #6 on: 2021-05-07, 01:19:50 AM »
Do you use bleach for faster germination? How do you treat the seeds ? Might be worth a try. I was considering to use GA3 and Benzladenine, which I use as help for Passiflora germination. But I don`t like it and and alternative is preciated.

William S.

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #7 on: 2021-05-07, 07:19:56 AM »
https://tgrc.ucdavis.edu/seed_germ.aspx

Yes, I have some small 2 ounce measuring cups which I think may be used by bartenders. I pour in one ounce of bleach and one ounce of water. A drop of clear dish soap sometimes. Then I use a timer on my smart phone, put the seeds in and wait 30 minutes. I rinse by pouring into a small sieve I use to decant fermented tomato seeds and rinse under the faucet. I did this awhile back with LA2329 and the germination was much faster. So now that time is of the essence it seemed essential to repeat.

This definitely softens the seed coat. For surface sterilization I think the protocol was only 10% bleach and a drop of surfactant (liquid dish soap) and for a shorter duration such as one minute or was it ten while stirring.
« Last Edit: 2021-05-07, 07:24:12 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

ImGrimmer

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Re: Is it too late for habrochaites?
« Reply #8 on: 2021-05-09, 08:30:30 AM »
Thank you William, I will test it.