Author Topic: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book  (Read 306 times)

William S.

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Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« on: 2021-04-11, 03:49:37 PM »
It would be cool if the various authors who have written book chapters or articles about tomato breeding. Carol Deppe who wrote a call to arms chapter about breeding for late blight resistance, Alan Kapuler who wrote about occasionally outcrossing tomatoes, Joseph Lofthouse who is currently writing a chapter on promiscuous and obligate outcrossing tomatoes for his new book, Craig Lehoullier who writes books and cofounded the dwarf tomato project, Laurie McKenzie who wrote the OSA organic seed guide, and Andrea Clapp who wrote the WTS articles on tomato breeding could all collaborate, put that info together into a single volume and then we might just have the perfect book by and for traditional tomato breeding.

Maybe add Tom Wagner and or some others in as well if they could contribute chapters.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

galina

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #1 on: 2021-04-13, 08:17:22 AM »
What is Tim Peters doing these days?  He used to do a lot of tomato breeding.
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William S.

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #2 on: 2021-04-13, 04:39:16 PM »
He does landscaping work. He is on linked in. I like his Sweet Cherriette tomato. Also Forest Fire. I haven't grown all of his.
« Last Edit: 2021-04-13, 06:15:47 PM by William S. »
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Diane Whitehead

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #3 on: 2021-04-14, 09:49:47 AM »
My favourite of his tomatoes is Sweet Orange II.  He wrote that it was the one deer sought out.  It produces all season, and then before the first frost I pick the remaining tomatoes and bring them into the house.  One year I decided to see how long they would remain good, so I put a sign on the bowl that no one was to eat them.  They were still good in April.

Tim also bred radish and melons that I grow every year.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #4 on: 2021-04-14, 02:55:12 PM »
Yeah seems like Tim worked a bit on cold hardy crops.

I am growing some kale that he bred this year.

I haven't grown any of his tomatoes / melons sadly.

I think I tried Sweet Cherriette before.

A tomato breeding / information type of small book would be interesting.

Could go in a lot of directions with a book like that.

Could discuss cold hardy tomatoes combined with flowers that can fruit at low temperatures. Could talk about insect resistant wild tomatoes.

Could discuss anthocyanin tomatoes, dwarf tomatoes, micro dwarf.

Could also discuss approaching tomato diseases that need dealt with.

Could discuss the ornamental types of tomato flowers, SI / SC  tomatoes could be mentioned as well.

There could be different sections about different tomato species as well.

Of course with all of the contributors there could be differences in opinions. So there would be that to consider.

William S.

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #5 on: 2021-04-14, 04:24:49 PM »
Another way to go would be interviews and profiles of as many tomato breeding experts as possible. However the idea of chapter authorship I like a little better. Some of these folks could probably write very interesting stand alone books on tomato breeding alone. Rebsie Fairholm did such a thing for potatoes a few years ago.

I think this wild tomato species work we do adds layers of endless fascination. Growing the wild species alone is worth a chapter or more, it's such an exploration. It also greatly expands on what a tomato can be.

The work that folks have done in terms of stripes, and spots and colors in recent years is just amazing. In 2006 I joined seed savers exchange and promptly moved to California. Was unable to use the book but the tomato section was just huge. In the 15 years since tomatoes have just gotten fancier.

I feel like all these fascinating stories are out there to read on the net and as parts of books. Just not compiled into a volume.
« Last Edit: 2021-04-14, 04:29:06 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #6 on: 2021-04-14, 04:59:18 PM »
Brad Gates / Wild Boar Farms have done a good bit of work with striped / antho tomatoes.

William S.

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Re: Traditional Tomato Breeding Book
« Reply #7 on: 2021-04-14, 05:22:25 PM »
Yeah I love Brad Gates tomatoes. His Blue Gold is the probable father on my much shorter season blue bicolor and an unknown Lofthouse potato leaf was the mother. His stuff isn't terribly long season either. Trends towards 75 DTM.

Tom Wagner has been doing the same sort of thing longer and more. There's quite a few others who have been involved as well. Lee Goodwin at his J & L gardens is one who I've liked.

Another neat little story is Alan Kapuler's tomatoes. Lots of long tress tomatoes that have cool features.

There are some others I've never grown a tomato bred by but who have contributed alot Dean Slater, Blane Horton, and Bruno Fournier might be three of them.
« Last Edit: 2021-04-14, 05:47:58 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days