Author Topic: Goal: To improve selection of Mayapple plants available to gardeners  (Read 116 times)

Johann Kuntz

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Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) is a North American native woodland plant that produces a tasty edible fruit and also has some medicinal value.  After quite a bit of searching the web I've found that although there are a fair number of nurseries carrying mayapple, only one nursery was even selling any select form (P. peltatum f. deamii); a pink flowered form with deeply pigmented fruit (in contrast to the white flowers and greenish-yellow fruit more commonly found). 

It is well documented that this wide spread species has both self-fertile and obligate outcrossing populations.  These traits would be very important to document for home gardeners if fruit is desired as one will never get fruit if planting only a single clone of an obligate outcrosser unless wild specimens are nearby for cross pollination.  Unfortunately, I have not found a single nursery which has taken time to determine if the plants they are selling are self-fertile types or outcrossing types.  I would love to change that.

I've already acquired a specimen of P. peltatum f. deamii, but am looking to source rhizome cuttings (when in season) from the following:
  • a clone from a suspected self-fertile population which produces good fruit crops
  • a clone that exhibits dark mottling on the leaves as it would be a nice trait for garden plants

If you have access to unique clone worthy mayapples I'd love to hear from you.  I've got plenty of interesting stuff available for trade if so!

Note: I'm in the USA.

Nicollas

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Johann Kuntz

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Check with Nathan : https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/project/7

Thanks.  I have read his project description and see no indication that identifying either self-fertile forms or forms with splotched leaves have been part of the project.  I'll reach out though.