Author Topic: Goji  (Read 462 times)

Chance

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Goji
« on: 2021-02-25, 12:43:35 PM »
Anybody else growing goji from seed?  I have a 4 year old seedling from JLHudson “large leaf” but the leaves do not approach the 5 inch size of the mother.  For me selection goals would be large leaves, vigor, and non-invasive growth habit.  What’s interesting about the “large leaf” cultivar is its L. barbarum which typically is the berry species while the leaf species is chinense.  I’ve noticed though that the chinense leaves I’ve tasted have a funky solanaceous sort of flavor while the barbarum, at least this seedling, is much more palatable.  Chinense leaves do tend to be larger but I haven’t seen one with 5 inch leaves.  I received a few seed from the “amber” cultivar which is supposed to have very nice berries.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #1 on: 2021-02-25, 03:23:04 PM »
Experimental farm network is selling a large leaf selection from JLHudson.

  I planted a few different goji berry species a few days ago. Unsure if they will all germinate though.
 Lycium barbarum
 Lycium excserum
 Lycium ruthenicum
 Lycium berlandieri

 If they grow I will see if they naturally hybridize.

Chance

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Re: Goji
« Reply #2 on: 2021-02-26, 09:47:33 AM »
Some of the American species seem interesting.  A couple from the SW I hear fruit in the spring, so pollen would need to be stored to test crossing with goji.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #3 on: 2021-02-26, 10:06:30 AM »
 The flowering times might overlap a small bit, I could stress the plants to make them flower later or earlier as well. If those don't work, I will have to try storing the pollen as you mentioned.
 
 I could try growing a few indoors from cuttings after they are fruiting, and then try and mimic different seasons indoors using lighting times and other things - I managed to get a chilense grown from seed to flower/fruit
 by making fall hour lighting periods using grow lights.

 Being desert plants, I may have to prepare well draining soil in order for them to thrive. They are somewhat cold hardy from what I have been reading - maybe to 7 - 9. Sources seem to vary.
 Growing them inside as potted plants might work well enough. Though I may need to turn them into bonsai.

 Either way I probably won't be able to do this until they all begin fruiting, which from seed will take awhile. Gives me time to think up a bunch of things I suppose.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #4 on: 2021-03-09, 05:30:04 PM »
One sprout on Lycium exsertum, two sprouts on Lycium ruthenicum. Once they begin to grow I should be able to verify that they are the correct species.

Johann Kuntz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #5 on: 2021-03-10, 05:11:24 AM »
I highly suspect your large leaf goji is actually Lycium chinense NOT Lycium barbarum.  English language references seem to consistently confuse the two, but from my study on this topic I feel very confident that Lycium chinense is the species preferred for leaf/shoot production.  I've even seen Lycium chinense being sold labeled as Lycium barbarum at more than one reputable nursery.  I find Lycium chinense fruit to be far less tasty than Lycium barbarum fruit (at least fresh, I haven't compared them dried). 

From my numerous failed attempts to grow annual leafy vegetables which produce anything remotely worthwhile despite being grown from improved seed selections, I'm suspecting that the five inch goji leaves you reference may have less to do with genetics and more to do with growing conditions.  They were probably grown with a very stable moisture supply and lots of nitrogen in order to allow production of such massive leaves.  Pruning management likely plays a role as well.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #6 on: 2021-05-11, 05:47:59 PM »
Posting Lycium exsertum and Lycium ruthenicum seedlings.

The plant on the top is Lycium exsertum, ruthenicum is on the bottom.

I actually forgot to water these for a week or two. They didn't seem to care. Probably because both species are desert Lycium species. I am getting well draining soil mixes to prepare a small area for these plants. They should be hardy enough if their roots don't get hit hard by frosts towards the end of the year. I will be attempting to hybridize these species.

There are Triploid - Tetraploids Chinese Wolfberries.
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10528-018-9861-x
Fun link for people who want to breed gojis. Possibly helpful if anyone ever wants to attempt tomato-goji hybrids as well. Ploidy could matter quite a bit, even with embryo rescue.

Unsure of what these two Lyciums that I posted fall under in terms of ploidy.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #7 on: 2021-05-11, 06:01:16 PM »
These won't fruit for awhile even if they survive. Some users on here might appreciate desert plants that can take frosts. If everything goes well, I will try and distribute seed. That is a bit into the future though.

Nicollas

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Re: Goji
« Reply #8 on: 2021-05-11, 10:55:00 PM »
I've sown black goji with alleged bigger fruits (https://www.plant-world-seeds.com/store/view_seed_item/6309), still waiting for sprouts

Here is some chinese germplasm of NQ* series. NQ5 is male sterile so its could be usefull for attempting many crosses in an easier way

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #9 on: 2021-05-19, 09:35:18 PM »
I've sown black goji with alleged bigger fruits (https://www.plant-world-seeds.com/store/view_seed_item/6309), still waiting for sprouts

Here is some chinese germplasm of NQ* series. NQ5 is male sterile so its could be usefull for attempting many crosses in an easier way

Those male sterile gojis do seem nice for attempting crosses.

I bought seeds of big black goji from England last year but none germinated.  And the description said it was "easy to grow".

 Quote from elsewhere on the forum - possibly the same source.
 I have ordered from Plantworldseeds before. None of my columbines or other things from them ever sprouted. I had assumed that they may have been irradiated.
 Let me know if you ever get sprouts!
 Phytosanitary and other things are troublesome if there is a chance that I won't receive good seed.

https://www.desertmuseum.org/visit/sheets/Lyciumspp.pdf
Some different North American species.
« Last Edit: 2021-05-19, 09:37:27 PM by Garrett Schantz »

Nicollas

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Re: Goji
« Reply #10 on: 2021-05-19, 10:14:34 PM »
I've got ~70% germination on my black goji. Seedlings seems legit lycium but no true leaves yet.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Goji
« Reply #11 on: 2021-05-20, 08:38:35 AM »
I can't remember if it was this forum or the old Alan Bishop Homegrown Goodness forum,  but someone had mentioned you can cross Gogi berries with tomato. Is anyone going to try that with black goji berries?! That would be very interesting.

Guess it was here!
http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=231.0
« Last Edit: 2021-05-20, 08:40:54 AM by Andrew Barney »

Chance

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Re: Goji
« Reply #12 on: 2021-05-20, 09:07:13 AM »
Regarding some of the American species, at least one was consumed with clay which isn’t super reassuring but doesn’t necessarily mean toxicity either. 

Andrew, there is also Chinese research of repeat grafting tomato seedlings on goji plants in order to create tomatoes with high polysaccharides and improved texture.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Goji
« Reply #13 on: 2021-05-20, 10:13:28 AM »
Lycium berlandieri, L. andersonii and L. exsertum appear to be the ones that were foraged the most by tribes.

I will probably keep L. exsertum inside, keeping it at a small size. Probably going to treat it like a cactus in terms of care / watering. Bring it outside to attempt crosses and other things. Thorns might be annoying indoors but cactus plants have spines.

Nicollas

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Re: Goji
« Reply #14 on: 2021-05-20, 10:13:49 AM »
I can't remember if it was this forum or the old Alan Bishop Homegrown Goodness forum,  but someone had mentioned you can cross Gogi berries with tomato. Is anyone going to try that with black goji berries?! That would be very interesting.

Guess it was here!
http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=231.0

Its on my list yes, to have a really black tomato (among other things)