Author Topic: Project Jo-Gee-oh 2020 on  (Read 361 times)

Jeremy Weiss

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Project Jo-Gee-oh 2020 on
« on: 2020-11-14, 09:16:09 AM »
Hi all

Well, it's me Jeremy (better known to people here who were on the Homegrown Goodness site as blueadzuki) freshly joined and ready to start talking

I thought I would start with an update on corn project Jo-gee-oh (for those who weren't there when I started it, this is a project to breed a miniature flour corn from some miniature flour flint I got my hands on about ten or so years back)

Progress has not been good, for the usual reason (animals eating all of the seeds as soon as I plant them outside). my material is basically down to the all white stuff, plus about three kernels (two red one speckled). So I guess the corn will be a little on the white side (though since all of the white kernels came from multicolored ears, this isn't exactly certain)

I sprouted some this year (before the critters ate them) so I at least know the seed is still viable.

And while I am depleted of white flour, I still have my full compliment of it's sister miniature dent and sweet finds.

  Will update as new information comes in.

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Project Jo-Gee-oh 2020 on
« Reply #1 on: 2021-02-06, 08:23:17 PM »
 Project has hit a little snag. I did a test of the corn seed and it turns out the flashlight I used for my light test*  must have been weak. With a stronger light, about half the saved seed failed the test, so it looks like I only have about half the seed I thought. That's still plenty  but it does mean I need to be more careful

So as not to let it go to waste, I'm using the failed seed in germination tests to work out how much vitality is left in the sample (now that it is so old). Hopefully, as all of the corn was collected at the same time, I can interpolate it for the other ones, and not have to waste seed on germination tests on them.

*That's how I work out the arrangement of starch in the kernel without having to cut it in half. I shine a light through it. Hard starch is translucent, soft is opaque.