Author Topic: Treating mould on seed  (Read 278 times)

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Treating mould on seed
« on: 2021-03-06, 02:28:54 PM »
Hi, hope everyone is well.
I just got two packs of seed sent to me in the mail.
It looks like they were packed fresh.
They came in Manilla envelopes and had a heap of dried membrane as well as mould on the seed
I brushed the seed back by hand, seperated the best from the worst, and packed them with a moisture removing thing I got out of a bottle of vitamins, then put them into the fridge.
I didn't treat them, but the lower temperature and moisture should slow the mould right up

Anyway, these seed are almost impossible to get here, grey Hopi Hubbard, and I want to use them to breed to my other blue hubbards ( jarradale, Stella blue, blue Hokkaido etc.)
They are really good storing fruit, so I'd like to use the 18 seed I have.

Any advice on how to use these?
Do I kill the mould now, or just do it as I scarify to plant them out in a couple months?
All suggestions welcome.
Thanks
« Last Edit: 2021-03-06, 02:47:01 PM by Plantman »

Adrian

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 143
  • Karma: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #1 on: 2021-03-06, 03:03:22 PM »
The moisture don't look too deep. If your season start in may a seedling toward a window in a big pot (1 liter) is possible for the most moldy seeds.The most important is a temperature above 15C 59F and a minimum of 12h of light per day.
The most dangerous for me is the seeds with the moisture on the germ.
For the seeds the less modly, you can wait a moment.
« Last Edit: 2021-03-06, 03:43:31 PM by Adrian »

William S.

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 858
  • Karma: 48
    • Botanist, gardener, and preservice science teacher.
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Dfb Googled
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6A
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #2 on: 2021-03-06, 03:46:26 PM »
10% bleach one minute with a drop of free and clear dish soap. Stir. Rinse. Dry back out. Repeat before planting.

Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63
  • Karma: 11
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Cfa
  • Hardiness Zone: 7
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #3 on: 2021-03-06, 07:25:00 PM »
Cinnamon works well and will not inhibit germination

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 251
  • Karma: 14
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #4 on: 2021-03-06, 09:43:32 PM »
Diluted Hydrogen peroxide should work. Have tried it on seeds that became moldy before. I didn't dilute mine much due to it being over 10 years old.

I would try cinnamon - bleach and those things that the others mentioned.

I would keep them separated for awhile until they completely dry out to prevent mold from spreading again - if it reappears on a few of them you can just treat those ones again. Afterwards you could plant them or store them.

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #5 on: 2021-03-07, 01:05:55 AM »
The moisture don't look too deep. If your season start in may a seedling toward a window in a big pot (1 liter) is possible for the most moldy seeds.The most important is a temperature above 15C 59F and a minimum of 12h of light per day.
The most dangerous for me is the seeds with the moisture on the germ.
For the seeds the less modly, you can wait a moment.
They are pretty woody with a solid ectosperm.
They won't be put out until October, I'm in Australia.
I garden indoors, so light hours and temps are controllable.
Thank you.
« Last Edit: 2021-03-07, 01:08:10 AM by Plantman »

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #6 on: 2021-03-07, 01:09:19 AM »
10% bleach one minute with a drop of free and clear dish soap. Stir. Rinse. Dry back out. Repeat before planting.
Thanks mate
So treat before storage and again on scarification/germination?

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #7 on: 2021-03-07, 01:11:46 AM »
Cinnamon works well and will not inhibit germination
Can you recommend a *dose* and duration for treatment?
On scarification do you mean?

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #8 on: 2021-03-07, 01:18:18 AM »
Diluted Hydrogen peroxide should work. Have tried it on seeds that became moldy before. I didn't dilute mine much due to it being over 10 years old.

I would try cinnamon - bleach and those things that the others mentioned. the

I would keep them separated for awhile until they completely dry out to prevent mold from spreading again - if it reappears on a few of them you can just treat those ones again. Afterwards you could plant them or store them.
They are dry now
Took 6 week in transit. Inside a yellow paper envelope, inside another yellow envelope. No plastic.
I'm pretty sure the mould is inhibited now, from temp and low humidity ( the moisture control thingy from the vitamins)
I'm just a bit anxious as our govt just changed import requirements, and banned all private import of seed to here.
These are my only attempt at maintaining this genetic, unless I want to drop $500 on a research importation
Thank you.
« Last Edit: 2021-03-07, 01:23:56 AM by Plantman »

William S.

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 858
  • Karma: 48
    • Botanist, gardener, and preservice science teacher.
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Dfb Googled
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6A
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #9 on: 2021-03-07, 07:16:47 AM »
Thanks mate
So treat before storage and again on scarification/germination?

That was my thought yes.

If your hydrogen peroxide comes as a 3% solution like ours no need to dilute it. You can do one minute of 3% H202 after the 1 minute of bleach if you like.

I have never scarified squash seed.

Honestly this won't hurt the seed but it would probably be fine untreated.
« Last Edit: 2021-03-07, 11:22:11 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63
  • Karma: 11
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Cfa
  • Hardiness Zone: 7
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #10 on: 2021-03-07, 07:44:04 AM »
Can you recommend a *dose* and duration for treatment?
On scarification do you mean?

Just roll the seed around in some cinnamon till it gets coated.  As much as needed, unlike bleach it s not going to disrupt germination if you overdo it. 

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #11 on: 2021-03-08, 10:02:00 PM »
That was my thought yes.

If your hydrogen peroxide comes as a 3% solution like ours no need to dilute it. You can do one minute of 3% H202 after the 1 minute of bleach if you like.

I have never scarified squash seed.

Honestly this won't hurt the seed but it would probably be fine untreated.

Soil is here is very poor sand and is naturally water repellent, so everything gets a quick soak at least of kelp and fulvate.
I think I'll germ these in peat pots, rather than straight into final position. I've never transplanted cucurbits before.
I'm doing 3 or 4 seed saving runs of bean and corn next season, one bean ( tuvaglieda ) I only have 22 of.
Those will be germed individually also, before the season indoors
I'll just run these with those.
Cheers

Plantman

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Treating mould on seed
« Reply #12 on: 2021-03-08, 10:03:44 PM »
That was my thought yes.

If your hydrogen peroxide comes as a 3% solution like ours no need to dilute it. You can do one minute of 3% H202 after the 1 minute of bleach if you like.

I have never scarified squash seed.

Honestly this won't hurt the seed but it would probably be fine untreated.

Coat the seed before I plant them, gotcha.
Thanks