Author Topic: Breeding Brassica oleracea for winter greens  (Read 1438 times)

reed

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Re: Breeding Brassica oleracea for winter greens
« Reply #30 on: 2021-04-23, 09:11:03 AM »
They are delicious and what strikes me is all parts are delicious, even the thick stems. O'wow, I just thought of something else. I love the immature seed pods of turnip, radish and kale, I bet these will be even better. Maybe I should stop eating so many in the bud stage so I have more to eat as pods. 

reed

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Re: Breeding Brassica oleracea for winter greens
« Reply #31 on: 2021-05-26, 07:23:52 AM »
Turns out the seed pods on these plants are not nearly as good as those on turnip or radish, that's a bit of a disappointment. Flavor is OK but it's like chewing on bailing twine. Still, overall this has turned out a huge success.

I imagine I could harvest a pound or more of seed but probably won't mess with reaching for the maximum on that. From the looks of it the first ones will be ready in a couple of weeks but they will keep on coming for a long time so once I have a good amount form each plant I'll go ahead and tear them out so I can use the space for something else.

The pods aren't so good but the flower heads and stems have been a real treat for weeks and had I known how abundant they were we could have eaten a lot more of them and still got lots of seed.

I'll save lots to plant again in late summer but gonna also go ahead and plant some immediately too just to see how they do. I've decided these plants are actually annuals in that it only takes a year to grow them for both food and seed. It's just that the year runs from the neighborhood of June to June. It may even be possible to completely naturalize them like the radishes, turnips and dill.

I did notice differences in flavor with the biggest plant and also the one that seemed most hardy being slightly less delicious than the others, I think it is a savoy cabbage of some type. The purple ones which I believe are mostly cabbage are the most tasty but less productive. Some that I believe are Brussels sprouts were most abundant in making the tasty stems. In the end though they are all great and I now have a nice mix up of crossed seed, all from plants that survived temperatures of - 5 F without snow cover. It can get much colder than that here but it's a start. 

Even though I will be pulling them out before maximum seed production I expect to have more than enough in case anyone else is interested in some.   
« Last Edit: 2021-05-26, 07:34:12 AM by reed »