Author Topic: Tomato plants melt with fall rains  (Read 818 times)

William S.

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Tomato plants melt with fall rains
« on: 2019-03-29, 08:17:55 AM »
A relative of mine lives on an island in the Puget sound in Washington state. She says her tomato plants "melt" with the onset of fall rains. I'm thinking that the agent of her melt must be late blight. Do you think I could send her a few blight resistant tomato plants to see if they don't melt? Maybe her garden could be a good testing ground? Or could her fall tomato melt down be something else?
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Tomato plants melt with fall rains
« Reply #1 on: 2019-03-29, 10:42:54 AM »
I've never thought my blighted plants had melted - looked more scorched.

The fall rains also coincide with much cooler weather, especially if they don't happen till sometime in October,
so it could be the cold that is affecting her plants.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

William S.

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Re: Tomato plants melt with fall rains
« Reply #2 on: 2019-03-29, 10:49:47 AM »
I visited in November and there was a isolated plant at the place I was staying still alive and reasonably healthy. Not productive though. Might it be that productivity totally stops with the rains?
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Tomato plants melt with fall rains
« Reply #3 on: 2019-03-29, 11:01:03 AM »
I usually pick all my tomatoes late in October as we often get frost in November.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil