Author Topic: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?  (Read 1111 times)

cberry1994

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Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« on: 2019-02-22, 09:50:31 AM »
I'm interested in breeding my own field corn. More as a hobby than anything. But hey, if I get lucky, it would be cool to use my own hybrids in our commercial fields. Anyways, I am in north central Kansas. Our weather is usually on the dry side of things, 18" average during the growing season. Our average July high is 93 degrees, but on average we have 12 days over 100 a year and 4 or 5 over 105. Clay to silty loam soils. Anyone have any suggestions on inbreds that I should try? 

I have already ordered tx202, tx204, tx205, OH43E, B73 o2o2, and LH200 off of the GRIN website strictly based on descriptions on the website. There's a lot of USDA ARS GEM inbreds on there, but no descriptions. Quite a few from Iowa State and UNL as well. So many inbreds, so little information. 

Also interested in experience and tips from other hobby breeders. 

Thanks for any input!

reed

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #1 on: 2019-02-23, 06:14:14 AM »
Welcome to the group! Are the corns you listed yellow dents? If so is that what you are looking for in yours? Are there large commercial fields in your neighborhood? If so how will you go about avoiding or detecting GMO contamination in your crops?

I'm also working to develop my own corns but I'm looking for something more like Dave Christensen's Painted Mountain or Carol Deppe's Magic Manna and Cascade flints. I like the colors among other things of these plus their shorter maturity makes it much easier to time planing to avoid possible contamination from other varieties. I want to be able to plant mine early where they flower before other corn, or plant them late so they flower after.

I did a lot of research a while back and I think that Iowa Stiff Stalk is probably in a lot of modern corns including sweets but I don't know much else about the commercial inbred lines.

« Last Edit: 2019-02-23, 06:17:13 AM by reed »

cberry1994

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #2 on: 2019-02-23, 11:44:55 AM »
Thanks! Yeah they're yellow dents besides tx204 it's white. And yeah there are commercial fields around, but I'm not particularly worried about GMO contamination as there's no non-gmo market around. I'm after grain yield. It's probably a long shot, but seed prices haven't gone down with grain prices. If I could get lucky and make a few hybrids that yield similar to commercial ones it'd save a lot of money. I'd like to get my hands on Tx777 but I'm not sure how.

What do you use your colored corn for?

Carol Deppe

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #3 on: 2019-02-23, 12:36:44 PM »
What is the purpose of the hybrid corn you want to breed? And what characteristics do you want? What sort of ear size, maturity, yield, etc?

Have you considered using open-pollinated varieties as one or more parent? Such hybrids might give you as much uniformity as you need.

cberry1994

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #4 on: 2019-02-23, 01:51:13 PM »
Purpose is for grain. All will go to the ethanol plant or feedlot. Generally we plant between 107 and 116 day but I wouldn't be opposed to 118-120 day as we have the growing season for as long as we want. Population is usually 20-24,000/acre on 30" rows so more pendulum like leaves and a flex ear/big ear would be advantageous. Heat tolerance and drought tolerance are top concerns. And no I haven't, is that something you'd advise looking into?

reed

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #5 on: 2019-02-23, 03:49:51 PM »
I want mine to be a nice ornamental that I can sell for a little cash cause in my area on small scale that is where the money is rather than as food. BUT, I also want it to be great food for myself. I plan to learn how to make cornbread, hominy, parched corn and lots of other things. Different colors as long as each ear is uniform have different flavor. The only ones I'v experienced myself so far are all red and all red chinmark, both of which are great parched and I expect when I have enough will also be great other ways.

I'm only interested in short season maturity now for several reasons but I'v grown and seen some great OP in my area of SE Indiana. Kentucky Butcher, Cherokee White Flour, Pungo Creek Butcher to name a few. They are too big and too long season for my purposes and they don't have that flex ear trait. I'm guessing that is what I see in the big fields where the ears droop upside down as they dry? I wouldn't mind having that trait but don't know how I'd get it without fouling up my other plans.
« Last Edit: 2019-02-23, 03:57:35 PM by reed »

Walt

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #6 on: 2021-03-24, 02:10:36 PM »
Iowa Stiff Stalk is a good choice.  It is a population made from combining several good inbreds, based on yield and stalk strength.  These were intercrossed then selection was made for several generation for stalk strength and yield.
Probably you know that modern field corn hybrids are from inbreds derived from northern flints x inbreds from southern dents.  The northern dent inbreds have dent backcrossed into them.  So in most commercial hybrid corn in the USA, an inbred on the northern flint side is derived from Iowa Stiff Stalk.  So I think you would want to add inbreds or OP varieties from Southern dents.
I'd include Cherokee Blue and White, Bloody Butcher, and/or Hickory King.  White Eagle is selected from Cherokee Blue and White, and it might be easier to get.
Origionally the corn from the desert Southwest were brought east over the centuries to produce the southern dent group.  So from them you might try some to get greater heat and drought tolerance.  But my experience with desert-adapted grain crops is that they are less disease resistant when grown in more humid areas.  Always there are trade-offs.

darjones

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Re: Breeding my own field corn. Any inbred suggestions?
« Reply #7 on: 2021-05-01, 02:41:49 PM »
It is tough to say this, but the potential to breed a truly useful new variety of corn for commercial production is very low.  The reason is because specific traits are needed to grow on a commercial scale.  That said, here are some thoughts.

There is a lot of potential to breed a higher protein and/or higher oil hybrid corn.  Dig around online and you can find a lot of articles about the positives and negatives of this approach.  PI 648432 is a unique high protein line available from ARS-Grin.  You will have to search diligently through research articles to find out why it has outstanding breeding value.  Look particularly at research on methionine.

Hybrid corn most of the time results in a loss of production when compared vs one or the other parent line or it just does not produce enough to be viable in a world where 140 bushels/acre is pretty much the norm.  You may have to make many crosses before finally finding one that gives high enough production to be interesting.

Too many breeding programs today have gone all out for increased volume i.e. higher starch production.  This is because corn growers are paid by the ton.  It does not matter if the corn they grow has higher protein or more oil, they get paid the same amount per ton.  This is why it is such a difficult environment to introduce a corn variety that may produce less than common commercial varieties.

I wish it were possible to produce a highly productive hybrid corn that combined high carotene, high protein, and high oil.  This would be a much more complete feed corn for chickens and pigs.

There is a lot of potential for enhanced nutritional value corn.  High carotene corn has been discussed quite a bit recently.  You might want to research professor Torbert's orange corn.  If you look around, you can find Cateto Sulino flint corn at Southern Exposure and Zdrowie Orange at Sandhill Preservation.  Sandhill also carries Piamonte.  I got the Nalo Orange from Hawaii seedgrowers.  If you dig around on a few forums, Oxbow Orange corn and Lofthouse high carotene flint are mentioned.  I know both Lofthouse and Oxbow.  The corn they are selecting derives from Cateto South American genetics.  There are a few other orange selections that can be found with a bit of digging.  For the most part, they are small seed small ear flints with relatively low production.  The biggest disadvantage of Nalo Orange is that it is adapted to a long season Hawaii climate.

You might also want to look into the pollen blocking trait which has been brought over from popcorn to field corn in the last few years.  Sandhill Preservation has "Rebellion" which has this trait.