Author Topic: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!  (Read 14502 times)

Nicollas

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #105 on: 2021-01-30, 04:14:17 AM »
Hi everyone, I'm Luca and I write from Ferrara, Italy. I'm a plywright and a teacher, but in my free time I take care of a small vineyard. I try to breed the varieties I have since 2013. Last summer I also started reading about tomato and goji breedind and I would like to learn more about it. I would like to find some vitis acerifolia and cinerea cuttings but in Europe they're not so easy to find, obvously if someone would have them, I could send some of my cuttings... Thanks for attention, Luca.

Welcome from France Luca !

I'm also interested by tomato and goji breeding. For now i'm waiting for my sweet cultivars of goji to fruit so i can cross pollinate and select from there. There are nurseries in Italy that seels NQ7 which is said to have good eatin qualities.

Kevin Collignon

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #106 on: 2021-03-23, 04:52:37 PM »
I didn't see this thread when I first got on here so I guess I'll introduce myself now.

Hello everyone, My name is Kevin I am 28 years old and recently "retired" from a almost 10 years in law enforcement with the last 5 years being a Sheriff's Deputy to pursue a simple life for me and my family. I have been married for 8 years and have two daughters ages 5 and 2 with a son to be born any day now. We live in a self built off-grid tiny house we get all of our house and garden water from rain water collection on a small section of a larger family property with about 2 acres that are mostly wooded with about 1/2 acre of cleared are that I am developing for annual gardens.

I live in Dobbin, Texas which is the south east portion of the state we stand at a whopping whole 260 ft in elevation. My USDA growing zone is technically 8B but most years we end up more in the 9A-9B we have 250-300 frost free days a year with about 55 inches of rainfall a year.

Our winters and early spring are typically wet and cloudy with high humidity  between 80-100% and high heat setting in by early April and lasts until the end of September with most mid summer days being 100+ degrees.

I have been gardening poorly at all of of my previous homes for the past 3ish years. Since moving to this new property I have been doing large amounts of research into gardening methods and plant breeding and was inspired by Joseph Losthouse's work to attempt to "landrace everything"

I am very excited to have found a community that supports these methods. Like I said this is all new to me so I will be doing a lot more asking questions than answering questions or giving advise.

Thank you everyone for the information and support they have already given me.
Full time small scale farmer and aspiring landrace plant breeder. Current breeding focus for the season are Tomatoes, Melons, watermelons, and potatoes.

Steph S

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #107 on: 2021-03-23, 05:35:40 PM »
Welcome Kevin, and best of luck with your garden this year and your new son.  :)

Andrew Barney

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #108 on: 2021-03-30, 09:51:20 AM »
Welcome Kevin and Bill and others!

Please jump right in to old threads or even better start your own threads on any topic of gardening & plant breeding of your favorite crops!

Bill i would love to hear about your gooseberries and whether you grow currants?!

clweeks

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #109 on: 2021-06-08, 08:45:16 AM »
Hi, I'm Chris. You probably don't know me from anywhere else. I'm an amateur, but reading a lot to catch up. I've been growing almost nothing but peppers for six(ish) years in our town-lot with only a tiny patch of sunny space, but moved to land eight months ago and am taking on gardening much more seriously. I'm on twenty acres of wooded sandy loam in northern Minnesota, zone 3b.

I'm 51, my kids are 26 and 19 and I've been married for 24 years. I've been writing software for 20 years which seemed like a great job since I was a hobby programmer before that, but now I hate it and feel trapped by my 'golden handcuffs' #firstWorldProblems, right? On the plus side, such a career funds hobbies nicely and I can afford to jump right into growing plants and suffer even pretty expensive losses (which I have -- all my true garlic seed is dead).

I'm growing: field corn, peppers, tomatoes, lettuce, garlic, melons, squash, pickling cukes, potato onions, potatoes from tuber and TPS, galangal, sea kale, horseradish, daikon, basil, arugula, leeks, other onions, garbanzos, common beans (bush and pole), chickpeas, wheat, apples - grafted cultivar and wild seeds, seaberry, blackberries, raspberries, sunroots, cilantro, pawpaw, walnut, strawberries, other berries, other herbs, tomatillo, lilac, daffodil, etc. I'm attracted to the writing and philosophy of Joseph Lofthouse. The two best books I've read this year are Carol Deppe's Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties and Will Bonsall's Essential Guide to Radical, Self-Reliant Gardening. I don't know how long it will take to gain this level of proficiency, but I'd like to grow all the food we eat for a year aside from occasional travel. (Long term, we're not going to give up oranges and bananas, but we could do it for a year.)

I think that's a pretty thorough intro. I'll probably be reading mostly -- I'm here to learn and figure it'll be a while before I have much to contribute.

(ETA: Why am I required to affirm that an elephant is smaller than a mouse in order to post?)

Andrew Barney

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #110 on: 2021-06-08, 10:12:09 AM »

 (Long term, we're not going to give up oranges and bananas, but we could do it for a year.)

I think that's a pretty thorough intro. I'll probably be reading mostly -- I'm here to learn and figure it'll be a while before I have much to contribute.

(ETA: Why am I required to affirm that an elephant is smaller than a mouse in order to post?)

Welcome! Sounds like you'll fit right in. I think you might have more to contribute than you think. I would love to hear more about your peppers. Im not sure how many dedicated pepper threads are here already.

I would assume the elephant question is to filter out spam on your first post.

Are you planning a greenhouse for bananas and oranges,?

I would love to do the same someday. Right now im growing an "Apple Banana" indoors. When we took our trip to Hawaii they tasted so good. I never want to eat common store bananas ever again.

https://youtu.be/9evVLC0lnsA

clweeks

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #111 on: 2021-06-08, 11:13:05 AM »
Thanks for the welcome!

I would assume the elephant question is to filter out spam on your first post.

It had the answer backwards. I had to say an elephant is *smaller* than a mouse to post. It took me several tries before I figured out what I had to do.

Are you planning a greenhouse for bananas and oranges,?

I was maybe unclear. I meant that those are examples of things we'll never grow and don't want to give up, but we could do so for a year in order to make the all home-grown challenge work.

I had a 6x6 Palram greenhouse but the wind grabbed it and scattered it all over our yard. I've salvaged what I could and plan to rebuild a bigger one from the scrap and extra hardware, panels, etc. But it's just season-extension, not for keeping citrus through the cold, cold winters. Maybe kale! :)

Steph S

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #112 on: 2021-06-09, 05:02:54 AM »
Welcome Chris.   :)  I love your ambitious growing plans.  Let us know how your first season there pans out.
I know people in Alberta who grow things in 'zone 3' that we can't manage here in zone 4 or 5.   So no doubt you'll have survivors to push the envelope as that is what the breeding is all about (and Joseph the master of that technique!).

Have a look at the thread(s) about Koppen zones.  That seems to tell more about the growing season in different places, instead of the old zone systems which reflect how cold your winters are and how long your summers are but none of the other details that matter so much.

clweeks

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #113 on: 2021-06-09, 07:02:22 AM »
I love your ambitious growing plans...Have a look at the thread(s) about Koppen zones

Yeah, the ambition has been kind of grueling. and certainly bit off more than I can chew. I've given up on getting a patch of sweet corn planted this year, for instance. And I was supposed to have a hen-house built, but it's just a foundation so far.

I read up a little on Koppen zones yesterday, actually I'm in Dfb. The USDA zones do capture useful info that Koppen doesn't (like our low temp this past winter was -36F and there are other places in Dfb that are much warmer and the plants that will overwinter are different), so maybe using them together is the way to go. And for all I know there are a bunch of other scales that are meaningful...neither of these two capture how much snow-cover we have insulating the ground, e.g.

Steph S

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #114 on: 2021-06-09, 10:08:22 AM »
Oh my the prairie cold!  :o   I agree, you have to combine more than one system to get even the vaguest idea what you can grow and especially overwinter.
We rarely go below -12C here and that for a few days, record low is -23.8C / only around -11 F.  Freeze and thaw all winter long, and the usual "cold day" is only around -6 C that is in the +20 F range.
OTOH we have late, cool springs and short cool summers.  Average high for July is only 70 F.  All told there are less than 60 days per year over 68 F/20C, not continuous but a few sprinkled early and late.   Record high 88 F.  Beans and squash are iffy crops as the weather rarely sticks to averages (I wish!).  Tomatoes and peppers pretty much a greenhouse crop, although they can be okay outdoors in an exceptional year.
Microclimate is also a huge thing.  You can find or create warm and sheltered spots.
So it really comes down to experimenting in your specific place and let the plan evolve over time, as you get to know what works.
Good luck, and don't worry about what doesn't happen the first year.  Better take it slow and don't burn out.  ;)

Greenie DeS

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #115 on: 2021-06-10, 09:46:04 AM »
I'm Greenie, currently in the interior of BC, in sub-boreal Canada. When I was a kid I wished plant breeding still existed as a profession but since it didn't seem to I contented myself with variety trials -- mostly tomatoes-- in scraps of land near a series of rental apartments in the pacific northwest.

Four years ago I moved up north to a dense clay acreage with short, cool growing seasons and intense winters (maybe 90 frost-free days and never warmer than 25C or so, more often 20C and 5-10C overnight, lows of -40 in winter).

The first year I put pigs on the grass to get rid of the sod. The second year I tried my favorite tomatoes from down south but in a greenhouse, got evacuated for wildfires, and had all my labels pulled out by crows. The third year I put in a utilitarian single-reliable-variety garden and was so bored that I barely tended it, plus it rained all year and never broke 20C, even the brassicas were sad.

This year I decided to have some fun and am putting in a 55-variety short-season tomato trial in a field, with regularly-placed exserted varieties to see what they can catch for next year. I'm trialing 15 wheats and 5 barleys, 20 squashes, various ground-cherries and tomatillos, and optimistically even a half-dozen melons and some very short-season flour and flint corns. Plus assorted brassicae etc. I'm very interested to see what I can get without a greenhouse up here, and to move things in the direction of not just short seasons but ability to produce in my cool short summers. I've also developed a fascination with haskap/honeyberry and plan to do some crosses on those. They're spectacular here.

I have a personal goal of producing 75% of my calories on the property, which looked like a lot of pork, goose, eggs, potatoes, and fermented brassicas without much grain or sweet last year.

I followed William S here recently as I was trying to track down the results of his tomatoes-from-seed etc project from permies.org, it's somewhat in line with where I eventually want to go with my trials up here and I wish I'd found it earlier. I did steal his stake-flags-as-markers which is one of those little things that makes life better.

Anyhow, I have no idea if I'll manage to ripen more than a handful of tomatoes or a single squash or melon this year but at least I'm not bored. This year's results will inform next year's plan: eventually I'd like to work towards, not just things that ripen, but crops that work in my mixed animal system and maybe eventually in mixed-crop fields that I can rotate pigs through and just skim a little off the top for myself, chaos-garden style. That's a long way away, though. Everything also needs to be self-sufficient for a week or two at a time throughout the summer since my job takes me into the field intermittently.

I also have a deep appreciation for perennial greens since they're up and going here long before anything else can get going. If anyone is working on anything along those lines, especially sorrel or de-stinging nettle, I'm very interested. In the much longer term, the deliciously licoricey sweet ciciley seems like it'd be great material for ...better roots? Forcing shoots? It looks fun.

Glad to find this forum, and I'll be keeping a sharp eye out for anything that produces calories or flavour without a lot of summer heat.

(And yes, I suppose anyone who gets in has passed a problem-solving test around how to answer the "elephant smaller than a mouse!" question!)

Steph S

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #116 on: 2021-06-10, 11:54:46 AM »
Hmm I suppose plant breeding must be about a lot of tiny elephants in the room, then.  ;)
Interesting projects you have Greenie.  I look forward to hearing about them.
If you find any tomatoes you can direct seed and get fruit with 90 frost free days, let me know!

We have similar summer temperatures, but I think our frost free are nominally around 120.
That being said, I'm sitting here waiting for rain to turn into snow as forecast, our high today 3C.  ::)

Will also be interested to hear about your wheat and barley trials.  I have a few in the ground myself this year, but a total newb as regards wheat and most other grain, I have tried a few seeds here and there but I would really like to find something I can grow a bunch of seed out and use as a garlic rotation.

William S.

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #117 on: 2021-06-10, 10:39:35 PM »
Hi Greenie,

Tomato adventures! Yaay. Glad you found my garden inspiring. Your plan sounds fun. What varieties do you have planted? 55 sounds like a lot of varieties. In 2017 when I did simething very similar and planted a very large number of varieties my takeaway was about ten favorites, but ten is maybe still too many. Especially with red tomatoes. In the F1 and F2 generations I ended up with a lot I knew must have crossed with something red. Hard to distinguish. However, I think if I were starting over I would try to really narrow it down even more. Maybe four or five varieties instead of ten. Some of my original ten I have yet to do anything with except I keep planting a few most years. Though I also didn't know which would be the most exciting until I tried them! So I hope it works out as well for you as it did for me.
« Last Edit: 2021-06-11, 09:16:42 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days