Author Topic: Fava breeding  (Read 7065 times)

William S.

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #60 on: 2021-11-23, 07:51:57 AM »
I like the green in yours, I have green but it is rare.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Tim DH

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #61 on: 2021-11-24, 01:30:51 AM »
Hi William,
I was SO Pleased to find the 2008 photo that I posted it straight off without thinking. My ĎBroadsí have been somewhat neglected of late, I just grow them. (It doesnít help that my wife is not a fan of Broad Beans!) Your thread on here is the third thing recently to re-spark my interest. The other two things being: (1) That I have developed a taste for Bean Cake, made from dry ground flour. (2) We have discovered that Bean Humous made from wet milled beans is GOOD!

Anyway, back to the colours. Ö The green is good fresh out of the pod but the brightness of all the colours doesnít last long once they are shelled.

The thing that struck me about that 2008 photo was the range of colours. I donít get that now. The photo from 2011, with quinces, shows a slight reduction in variety. After that I donít have many good photos until 2016 ( Shot as a result of utilising child labour in the shelling!!! ) when it appears that the colours had pretty much reduced to four (Black, Purple, Green & White).

This year Iím almost completely down to three colours, Black, Green and White. I can easily imagine how the colour might have homogenised over a long period, but for it to have polarised, in three directions, is curious.

William S.

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #62 on: 2021-11-24, 08:27:05 AM »
What I think is going on with mine is a lot of crossing and blurring. So lots of shades of purple, lots of shades of tan and not much green or yellow left. Looks like the new brown speckled trait is maybe dominant and maybe fingerprint trait is recessive to codominant. One clearly hybrid purple showed the fingerprint. Also may be some survival of the fittest going on. My 2021 pretty seeds planting produced mostly plain looking seeds. Half purple seeds produced tan, deep purple and half purple. Fingerprint produced some purple, some brown speckled, and some tan but very few fingerprint.

I need to decide if I want to steward the variety I have named another generation or not soon. Or if I want to see if someone else will steward it and then I use the space to start working on new iterations.

I think Josephs technique of equalizing colors might be useful with the planting seed. Also might be good to semi isolate by keeping the colors together in say a long row. Dark purple, half purple, tan, green, then yellow. Also maybe sizes as the tiny ones are a bit rare.

Though some colors like half purple may represent codominance.

I suspect I have good native bee populations adapted to pollinate the native lupine species here.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #63 on: 2022-01-11, 12:15:22 AM »
Figured I would post this here:

https://raindanceseeds.squarespace.com/rare-vegetables/maroon-spot-fava-bean

Didn't see this pheno here, I don't really grow Favas too much due to ants farming thing with aphids, but it looks nice.


And a mix.

https://www.siskiyouseeds.com/products/fava-beans-andean-mix

Nicollas

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #64 on: 2022-01-11, 05:01:36 AM »
Very nice, i'm putting the pic here for more visibility :


William S.

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #65 on: 2022-01-11, 05:36:48 AM »
I got the andean mix from siskiyou in 2020. Also a fingerprint fava and brown speckled. I planted them mixed with some of my older grex in 2020 and in 2021.

They seemed to wash out quite a bit in their second year in 2021. Reverting a bit to the tans and purples that dominate the original grex. Perhaps some outcompetition and some crossing. Or outcompetition by crossing.

My plan going forward is more small separations and color sorting to try to keep more colors in the mix but I'm not sure how it will work.

Also very interested in stabilizing new colors of fingerprint favas. Not sure how that will work out. One generation of outcrossing seems to have washed out most of the visible fingerprints except on one purple plant but the fingerprint fava patch is in a separate seed bag for now so hopefully in 2022 some will segregate back out.

I have also been gifted a Crimson Fava from a seed saver. It is a green fava with consistently crimson flowers a rare trait in my grex and green not as common as I would like.

Still waiting and hoping that my 2020 grown Montana Rainbow favas will pass testing for their release through Snake River seeds. 
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Fava breeding
« Reply #66 on: 2022-01-18, 03:31:21 PM »
Just got an email from Snake River Seed. Montana Rainbow Fava has 96% germination. Yay! My fava baby is going out into the world. Freeing my fava patches for further tinkering!
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days