Author Topic: Adding to the OSSI List  (Read 968 times)

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 36
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Adding to the OSSI List
« on: 2018-12-18, 08:02:37 AM »
I'm just wondering if there might be ways to get new things added to the OSSI list without the one doing the pledging, growing or selling the seeds themselves.

For example I have a great new bean, it's a cross between KY Wonder and (most likely) Ideal Market. It's, I think four years since the initial cross and not 100% stable but getting there. Could I name it say, Reed's Hoosier Wonder and pledge it anyway. Then sell, trade or give it to someone who would increase and sell it. How about my Reed's Tasty Pod Radish grex, till your dirt and spice up your salads in one easy step. Just wondering.


William S.

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 617
  • Karma: 41
    • View Profile
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #1 on: 2018-12-18, 08:38:37 AM »
I don't know an answer for sure, but it seems to me it's a supply chain. You breed it and pledge it. If you find someone who wants to offer it in a catalogue they may find a grower. For instance most of the folks in my local seed co-op are growers. So you could write emails to seed companies like Carol Deppes or Kristen Rome's or Baker Creek and ask if they might offer it. If they want to offer it they will either grow it themselves or contract for it. Some of the growing contracts are not huge. Similar to one large bed of something and profits for the grower are often similar to growing for veg.

To do all three is possible as well. I notice some pledged varieties like the sole parsnip is that they are pledged but there is no source really. Some are intentionally not comercially available but are distributed for breeding material- some of the pledged university carrot populations are like that.

Since I am kind of in the contract wildflower seed business it has occurred to me to offer my fava grex after next growing season.

I could pledge it, name it something like "Montana rainbow rock fava grex generation 3", and just grow it out, harvest it, test it or have it tested, and offer it on my website for $5 a packet say. Or I could offer it to the local seed co-op who only sell Windsor and see if one of their certified growers would grow it out and offer it through the co-op. I could also contract with one of the growers in the co-op (if they are willing) pay them for the crop to take advantage of their organic certification. Then offer it through the co-op if they like it, or through my own website as a OSSI pledged certified organic seed cover crop and breeders grex.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 36
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #2 on: 2018-12-19, 02:08:55 AM »
I'm not really all that serious about it myself. I just got a little anxious reading all the posts about patents and the like and thought the more stuff that gets OSSI pledged and the sooner the better but no use pledging stuff that isn't going to be increased and distributed and I'm not likely to do that. I only have one thing I'm thinking of trying myself.

« Last Edit: 2018-12-19, 02:10:53 AM by reed »

William S.

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 617
  • Karma: 41
    • View Profile
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #3 on: 2018-12-19, 02:19:50 PM »
I can really see why Carol is selling so many OSSI varieties in her catalogue- it helps to have someone selling the variety and if it's a variety you like it makes sense to list it in your catalogue. I suspect if a variety is OSSI and Carol likes it and the breeder is willing Carol would then list it.

I dream sometimes of doing a little seed catalogue like Carols and in my dream I have all the ultra hardy Montana tough short season vegetables- that are also perhaps a little too not mainstream even for my local seed co-op. Like my direct seeded Montana tomato project.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

bill

  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 114
  • Karma: 19
  • USA, WA Coast
    • View Profile
    • Cultivariable
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #4 on: 2018-12-21, 05:03:24 PM »
There is almost certain to be an OSSI seed company partner who would be willing to offer your variety, at least on a trial basis.  You could go look at the list and directly contact companies that you are interested in working with or we could try to match you up with someone.  You would still need to pledge the variety, but could otherwise be hands off.

Carol Deppe

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 121
  • Karma: 28
    • View Profile
    • caroldeppe.com
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #5 on: 2018-12-21, 05:32:32 PM »
I'm just wondering if there might be ways to get new things added to the OSSI list without the one doing the pledging, growing or selling the seeds themselves.

For example I have a great new bean, it's a cross between KY Wonder and (most likely) Ideal Market. It's, I think four years since the initial cross and not 100% stable but getting there. Could I name it say, Reed's Hoosier Wonder and pledge it anyway. Then sell, trade or give it to someone who would increase and sell it. How about my Reed's Tasty Pod Radish grex, till your dirt and spice up your salads in one easy step. Just wondering.

Varieties are always Pledged by their breeders. However, yes, sometimes the commercial growing and distribution/selling of an OSSI-Pledged variety isn't done by the breeder. For example, Dwarf Tomato Project has bred lots of OSSI-Pledged dwarf tomatoes, all grown and sold by a number of OSSI-partner seed companies. DTP participants are gardeners, and don't have facilities for growing and selling seed.

One of the basic requirements for OSSI-Pledging a variety, however, is the seed has to be available, at least in small amounts requested by email to the breeder. There is no point at all in Pledging and listing varieties that are not available. All it would do is discourage the hell out of people looking at the OSSI list and teach them to not take the list seriously. Most varieties are available commercially from at least one small seed company, which is no big deal when the breeder owns a seed company. If he/she doesn't, the variety often starts out being available only in small amounts from the breeder on request. The idea is that seed growers and seed companies can request the variety and evaluate it for growing/listing. So at the very least you need to be willing to distribute/sell the variety at least as small samples on request. However, you need to have a fair amount of seed available to do that. For example, if you have about two thousand seeds of a bean available, and it's relatively stable, that would be enough to send out 100 20-seed pkts. I'd be okay with Pledging it at that point. But if you have 50 seeds, you really need to build up the seed supply before it's appropriate to Pledge it. If a population is a grex, you would need a lot more than 20 seeds/sample for it to be very useful.

 There are a few cases where the process has gone wrong. The parsnip is one such. It was scheduled to be sold by Fedco when we pledged it, but the material Fedco had didn't germinate well enough, they cancelled introducing it, and the breeder wasn't set up to distribute himself. Hopefully he'll regrow the material at some point and get someone to sell it. Meanwhile we have a variety Pledged that isn't available. Not a good situation.

As for your F4 beans from an Kentucky Wonder cross, sure you could Pledge that if you have enough seed available to be able to send out small samples on request. So tell us more about the bean. Is it a pole bean? Does it have any of the powerful flavor characteristic of Kentucky Wonder? (If it's got the flavor of Kentucky Wonder, or any rich powerful flavor, I'd be interested in trialing it myself, and if I like it, growing and selling it via Fertile Valley Seeds.)

As for the pod radish grex, the obvious questions would be, what parents went into it, how many generations have they mixed it up genetically, how did you select, and do you have enough to be able to send out samples on request.


reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 36
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Re: Adding to the OSSI List
« Reply #6 on: 2018-12-22, 03:50:23 PM »
As for your F4 beans from an Kentucky Wonder cross, sure you could Pledge that if you have enough seed available to be able to send out small samples on request. So tell us more about the bean. Is it a pole bean? Does it have any of the powerful flavor characteristic of Kentucky Wonder? (If it's got the flavor of Kentucky Wonder, or any rich powerful flavor, I'd be interested in trialing it myself, and if I like it, growing and selling it via Fertile Valley Seeds.)

As for the pod radish grex, the obvious questions would be, what parents went into it, how many generations have they mixed it up genetically, how did you select, and do you have enough to be able to send out samples on request.
Ah Ha, good to know how it works. I don't have enough of either yet but will definitely, especially with the beans try to build that stock up next year. They are fine beans, on par with KYW for flavor. Pods are longer and flatter, the beans are larger, flatter and light tan. They are most definitely pole beans.

I could never remember what all went into the radishes. There is diakon, and French Breakfast, and  Cherry Bell, and every other radish I'v come across over last several years. Selection is for weediness, they mostly just do their own thing. I like milder flavor so I cull plants with hot tasting or tough stringy pods but of course their pollen is already loose by then.  We don't much eat the roots except maybe to thin a patch but I like those with really big roots to help till the dirt for me when they rot.