Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 5463 times)

Richard Watson

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I just noticed all my plants have heart shaped leaves
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
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Chris Morrison

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The Bbcuzzie that arrived here 2 days ago is about to flower, and should co-incide nicely with 2 multi-flowered 'hydras' on my Reds. So... the mating begins... hopefully! https://ibb.co/bgwb3vP

Richard Watson

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They look good Chris.

Ive got the water sprinklers currently in the area where my Camote are which tends to full the flowers with water, still wont get the bubble bees away though, they are still diving in and out of the flowers
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Sounds like you fellers might be on the way to some new kinds of sweet potatoes.  Good your plants have heart shape leaves as they have highest % of good big roots.

Plants from these seeds that don't flower at all are pretty rare, I think I might still keep them and give them another chance as clones next year, especially if they turn out with nice roots. Flowering is certainly genetic but I think environmental conditions can also play a role, but I don't have enough experience and they are way too screwy genetically to say for sure about much of anything.

Also they tend to mutate in first few generations of cloning after starting a new one from seed. I have only seen it happen once so far but research I found said it is pretty common. 

Richard Watson

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Yes I should and will keep the two non- flowering clones going, then there's the two indoor ones as well.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Chris Morrison

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Waiting for my Owairaka Reds to sync with Bbcuzzie - not long now
https://ibb.co/RgMd3Ck
https://ibb.co/mX5n6rt
https://ibb.co/D5FK5Q4
https://ibb.co/yRLsFgL

Richard Watson

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So, seed pods on the Kumara is a goal
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

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Still no seed pods developing. I do think that this summer is about getting these clones established and use to growing in a totally different climate, soil etc and then look to having cuttings taken before winter, kept in the house and planted out in spring meaning I will be so much further ahead than this summer, if I could have flowers open in early summer I reckon that will be better than reaching full flowering now in late summer. The daylight hours are getting shorter, even though the days are still warm the growth rate of everything is the garden has slowed a lot, the flowering of Bbcuzzie is in top gear (20 open flowers counted yesterday) but only the odd one on the rest and it seems the bubble bees only head for the flower cluster of Bbcuzzie and then bugger off. If next summer the Camote clones can do as well as this summers Kamara clones have done I'm confident one of us will get seed, just a matter of keep going and being patient 
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Yea, having a head start next year with clones of those plants should help. From your pictures I think you had pollination but I do think they need warm dry weather to finish up. Here lots of developing pods abort during cool wet spells. Don't rule out though that you can finish seeds up inside if you get some developing later. All you need is a warm sunny windowsill, just chop the stems off the plants and stick them in water. Or pot them in soil to root and save as houseplants. I'm anxious to see if you have any good sized roots. If so of course, you can save them to make slips next year.

Richard Watson

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Chris sent me this link https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/93034036/king-of-kumara?fbclid=IwAR05bQOcwYKMXDhCAuwbyNKa9lsA4Ky4YH_M2F6sKznZtSizAfLYC_XFtT8 Okinawa. It flowers also and is here in NZ already, Chris say he has a mate who got it and is going to give him some, it will be a great addition to the mix.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
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Richard Watson

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Now have the second to last outside plant forming flowers, not looking like the last one will but its been the best growing seedling. Another month and I'll be digging up and seeing whats underneath them as well as taking cuttings to share around

Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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The Okinawa is available here from several sources and the pictures look like it is the same as in your link. I'v got it on my list as a possible one to add to my mix. I hate spending lots of money buying slips, knowing that most of them will likely not bloom.

Richard Watson

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Okinawa clearly doesn't self pollinate.

Its still too early to properly tell yet but clone #7 looks like it may have seed pods developing, but I only say may
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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I broke down and ordered some Okinawa and I have a couple other new ones from the grocery store but thy might just be the same although they are slightly different color and they both might be Beauregard.  Probably will order at least four more. Probably gonna have 100 bucks or more into it before I'm done. It's OK if they are not self compatible, I don't expect them to be but I'll be real disappointed if I shell out money on any that don't bloom.

Richard Watson

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Another seedling showed in a pot, that makes 10 clones now, meaning there's going to be 12 plants to winterover in the house.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.