Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 18842 times)

reed

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ACV = Apple Cider Vinegar. Just following advice from the link I posted last week re Scarifying. Fingers crossed, really need my native seed (at least) to fire, if at all poss. I would theorize that the best DNA is contained within the hardest seed coats, just as many edible plants, grown 'hard' or even stressed, produce the best eating and keeping qualities.
That's an interesting notion, maybe I'll find evidence of it in my back garden. I call it the survival garden where I plant and forget, just leave it to the weeds and drought and then keep what seeds I do get.

Why do you think the best DNA is in the harder seed coats?

A longshot theory but the other way to look at this, is , maximizing  germ via scarifying may be a very simple hack vs all the hours foraging for seed over 3 months? Thanks for the info on seed-swell, that is helpful. Now I wish I left them on the wet napkin to imbibe, haha, more trials to come. Should have several thousand seed from the coming season, have to do better than 5% germ.

If you get thousands of seeds and plant say 1000, and 5% sprouted easy that would give you 50 plants. Do you think they might not be as good as those that would have sprouted with scarification?  I hope that isn't the case as that is the path I've taken with mine. I don't think it is though cause mine are just getting better in production, flavor as well more easy to sprout.

I think the more seed to seed generations that go by it easier and easier. Well except for the work and commitment part. Also think cause of their very complicated genetics we will never run out of new experiments to run and new things to learn.


Chris Morrison

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They keep on a comin. After 3 weeks of nothing, another 4 pop up in last few days.
10 weeks since planting. These are not from my scaify trial - nothing doing there, yet.
Note the water dropper pointing to a stuck seed pod.

reed

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Damned annoying ain't it? They do come around some after a few years. Nothing though on the scarified ones? How about the ones you dug up and soaked?

Chris Morrison

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Yes the ones I dug up and soaked = the scarification trial.
These were replanted into pots, but have not yet sprouted. Perhaps not enough time in the ACV?
I will have to dig around and see if rotted out, or still rock hard( I suspect the latter)

Richard Watson

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I dug around so many times trying to find ungerminated seed to no avail. Having used a soil/compost mix I reckon the seed has taken on the same colour and because the soil was screened its made up of small clods about the same size as the seed, like a bloody octopus hiding on the coral reef.
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps

Richard Watson

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Today is plant out day, I feel now the changeable spring weather has eased and the soil is warm enough.

how to upload pictures on the internet
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps

reed

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Looks like you got a heck of a pot garden going on there. Your sweet taters look pretty good too! Your gonna take them out of the pots and plant in the ground?

Richard Watson

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Most of those pots are trees for my forest planting.

Yes they will go into the garden, got a new bed ready yesterday.
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps

Richard Watson

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Another G1 seedling popped up, silly me mistook it for a weed and pulled it out -#*&%. I quickly potted it up hoping I didn't damage it to much
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
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Garrett Schantz

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I pulled up hybrid tomato volunteers out of pretty much clay soil before, bare root - they all survived. Seedling potato plants seem to take stress well the few times I have grown them as well.

Richard Watson

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I pulled up hybrid tomato volunteers out of pretty much clay soil before, bare root - they all survived. Seedling potato plants seem to take stress well the few times I have grown them as well.
Its looking fine this morning, so, should be ok.
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps

reed

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Thought it was a weed, that's funny. I expect it will be fine though. When it comes to rooting and transplanting they are pretty bullet proof.

Richard Watson

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A weed!!, it was underneath its older mate,
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps

reed

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They are a pain in the ass like that. Plant them thick cause you know a lot won't come up and the ones that do are all clumped together. I've often found little ones whose seed must have hitchhiked along with one that had been transplanted days or weeks before.