Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 11211 times)

reed

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That one doesn't look quite right, the little individual stem should be drying along with the capsule. And neither one should drop off, it should stay on the plant until dry. A fully mature capsule pops open and drops the seeds rather than falling off the plant.
I believe for that one I might cut the stem back as far as I could and take it in to finish drying. I'd set it on a plate or something to catch the seeds if it shatters open on its own.  It might not shatter open on it's own at all and if not, I'd let it dry all the way before trying to open it. The seeds are kinda fragile if not fully dry, completely dry they are like little rocks. A full one has four seeds but sometimes there might just be one. 

Chris Morrison

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Ok, thanks, will monitor, Cheers

Richard Watson

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Which way ya guna go Chris, leave it on the plant or remove it?

Does the seed flick out or drop reed
« Last Edit: 2020-01-17, 11:11:02 AM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

whwoz

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One other alternative would be to bag the capsule in one of the organza gift type bags, allow you to leave it on the plant and if it shatters, still catch the seed

Chris Morrison

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Hmmm, maybe it got partially pollinated? This is how it looked 4 days ago. Seems to be drying off as expected, but of course I have no idea of 'usual' time lines', can you help with these Mark? It is now 3 weeks since first spotted this (and first pic Richard posted). Thanks in advance.
Richard, I will monitor at this stage. Rather keep on the plant, one of those baggies sounds a good idea though, and I do need to get some for my MPS Bulbils.

reed

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Hmmm, maybe it got partially pollinated? This is how it looked 4 days ago. Seems to be drying off as expected, but of course I have no idea of 'usual' time lines', can you help with these Mark? It is now 3 weeks since first spotted this (and first pic Richard posted). Thanks in advance.
Richard, I will monitor at this stage. Rather keep on the plant, one of those baggies sounds a good idea though, and I do need to get some for my MPS Bulbils.
I've never accurately tracked how long it takes them to mature but seems like forever sometimes, I'd say a month maybe a little more. Warm dry weather is best for them maturing nicely. I wouldn't let that one get rained on if I could help it.

I don't know what causes them sometimes to not have the full four seeds, either incomplete pollination or some seeds just abort for some reason I reckon.

Does the seed flick out or drop reed
They don't explode open like some things do, the capsule just cracks open and they fall out

Chris Morrison

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It could be my imagination, but it seems to have 'shrunk' as it dries, and yes it also had 30mm rain on it a few days ago. Was hellish dry prior to that. I should have put the calipers on it, oh well , my natives and okinawan are flowering now, so hoping they produce, as the 2 pods I have so far are either self pollinated, or G1 x BB. The BB pod has also come from a 4 flower set up.

Richard Watson

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interesting how how weather has swooped around, become warm and dry here while cooler and wet for you.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Chris Morrison

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Yep Richard, not sure if we will get any licks of rain from Cyclone Tino, likely not? Weather after that looks good for flowering here 25 highs, 15 lows.
reed, may I ask why you say "I wouldn't let that one get rained on if I could help it"??
Thanks

reed

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Yep Richard, not sure if we will get any licks of rain from Cyclone Tino, likely not? Weather after that looks good for flowering here 25 highs, 15 lows.
reed, may I ask why you say "I wouldn't let that one get rained on if I could help it"??
Thanks

I don't know that a little rain by itself would hurt but they don't do well in cool cloudy periods. Cool to me for the time  when lots are maturing is highs of less than, say 25. They don't mind even cooler than that so long as it is dry and sunny. Cool, cloudy and damp for a period of a few days causes lots to abort, the capsule or the whole stem just falls off.  Some don't drop off but the seeds mold inside the capsule.

At end of July in 2018 I was looking at probably 5000 seeds in process of maturing. Then it turned off damp and cloudy for a time in August with highs in the 20s or so. 75% dropped of or molded. When I sorted the rest I discarded more cause they were shrunken or had evidence of mold. Ended up with just maybe 500 nice ones for that year but I hope maybe they might have more tolerance for that kind of weather. It impacts all stages from unopened buds to nearly mature.  Cool by itself doesn't hurt, they keep maturing all the way till frost but cloudy damp is a killer.

Anyway that particular capsule has the looks of one that isn't maturing quite the way we want to see. It might still have viable seeds in it but any exposure to dampness could ruin them at this point.

Here is picture of some that formed in poor conditions. Each little group came from one capsule. The dark black ones are good, the moldy or shrunken brown ones on the left and middle are bad.  The larger brown ones on right are probably good and that is what I imagine yours might look like right now. Hopefully they will end  up like the black ones but as long as they don't shrink(too much), pucker or mold they might be ok.
« Last Edit: 2020-01-18, 04:52:39 AM by reed »

Chris Morrison

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Ok thanks, that is very helpful. My garden is on a slope, so no water will lie about. In fact it gets real dry up there, so may have to irrigate - I better run soaker hoses rather than sprinklers I'm guessing, easy enough to do.

Chris Morrison

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Off with his head! Made the decision to bring this inside due to ongoing damp conditions, and it looks really dry, did not want to risk splitting. Will leave safely in a dry bowl until it 'pops'?

Chris Morrison

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Better pic

reed

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Nothing to do but wait now on that one. I suspect there might be a good seed or two in there.  Sometimes if they don't have a full four seeds or if they didn't dry completely in the sun they don't crack open on their own. If it doesn't I'd let it dry up for a week or more before opening it to be sure the seed itself isn't still soft. I've ruined lots by being impatient on seeing whats inside. Once all the way dry it would take a hammer to damage one.

Richard Watson

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Now that the weather is warming up nicely with 5-6 more days over 30 deg to come i should see some good growth. The biggest plant in the front is a clone that's never flowered and doesn't look likely too either, Okinawan Purple' and Chris's EFR dont have flower buds either, disappointing considering how well it flowered in spring inside the tunnel house




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Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.