Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 14232 times)

Richard Watson

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reed- question- when you grew in tubs/large pots, did you feed them with anything?. Had someone ask me about growing in pots and where letting them send there roots out the bottom into the ground.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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reed- question- when you grew in tubs/large pots, did you feed them with anything?. Had someone ask me about growing in pots and where letting them send there roots out the bottom into the ground.

No I don't feed them and I don't worry much about what I fill the pots with*, it's just dirt I take from the garden mixed with rough compost or more likely just some weeds I scraped up. Feeder roots do exit the pots into the ground so it's important not to move them once established and if the pots have drain holes around the sides to make sure those are buried.

They do very well  that way and the pots don't have to be large. Makes harvest super easy, just dump them out. Also gets them up off the ground, a little safer from rabbits. And it helps me select for the clump root trait  I like. If the big roots are all in the pot that's what I want and I'll keep a couple to clone the next year. If they formed off the feeder roots under or around the pot where I have to dig a lot looking for them em we just eat them all.

*I may be changing that this year. Up till now I'v mainly been concerned with seeds and figured feeding might be counterproductive to that. Now I have lots to clone and lots of seeds in back up so thinking it might be time to encourage maximum production and see if they also still make abundant seeds.
« Last Edit: 2019-11-26, 12:25:49 AM by reed »

Richard Watson

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That's pretty much what I thought you did. Soil and compost is all I use too, I'm not very garden center friendly as they dont get much $ outa me in there till
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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I ain't spent a penny at a garden center or big box place in years except maybe for an occasional tree. Buying dirt or mulch seems especially ridiculous to me. If I want a more nutritious mix I'll use more finished compost mixed with the dirt, maybe scape up a little bit from surface of the chicken yard. I think stuff from under the roost might be a little too much for sweet potatoes. 
« Last Edit: 2019-11-26, 06:41:57 AM by reed »

Richard Watson

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After transferring the plants to there beds it took a while for them to start growing flower buds again, Dec in not normally a great month summer wise, we had some warm days and then a few cold, Jan-Feb and March is the most settled period, so I'm pleased that there will be heaps of flowers ready to open when the summer warmth does kick in, plus there's 12 cutting plants fulling up the rest of the 6mx1m bed.
First of the hand pollination didn't come to anything, even though I could clearly see and used the pollen that was at the base of the flower.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Do you know if pollination did not happen or if they aborted instead of growing a capsule?

Three months is more than plenty of time. Actually I think not much more than 30 days is needed to go from bud to mature seed if weather cooperates.  What do you expect as far as temperatures for next three months?

Richard Watson

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Do you know if pollination did not happen or if they aborted instead of growing a capsule?

The flower bases just went yellow and dropped off
Three months is more than plenty of time. Actually I think not much more than 30 days is needed to go from bud to mature seed if weather cooperates.  What do you expect as far as temperatures for next three months?

What to expect?? , the spring time Sudden Stratospheric Warming event wont allow for any stable pattern we know that, there was fresh snow on the mountains yesterday morning. Sea temps between here and Australia are 2-3C deg higher than normal so when hot air does come off the continent it wont cool as much as it normally would by the time it gets here, those days expect highs of 30-35C overnight lows around 20C. Then we will have days when airflows come from the other continent, expect those days to have highs of 12-15deg, lows of 3-4deg. But those Antarctic extremes only happen two or three times per summer, most days are in the 20's and lows 10-15deg. Hot air from Australia is a lot more common though.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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What to expect weather wise in this day and age is a bit of a goofy question I reckon but your description of possibilities is pretty good. Sounds like if you get an uninterrupted period of air from the continent to the north you should get seeds.   A few days of flow frmm the south might not hurt too much unless it is associated with cloudy damp. If that happens you could have problems.

Our weird fluctuations, I think are cause of the arctic jet stream being destabilized but we have a similar effect. This season we were stuck in a ridge. Day temps of 30 C plus or minus for over 90 days, and dry. I got jillions of seeds this year. Last year a cool damp spell in August ruined half or more. Some flowers just dropped and lots of developing capsules did too.

Good thing is if weather cooperates you can get a lot of seeds and since they stay viable for a long time you can archive them as future insurance.

Richard Watson

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We dont really start to get the damp cloudy cool weather till April, its normally dry with low humidity. Feb will be the month for any seed set, its the month of the most settled warm weather
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

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Chris who lives 400kms north of me has managed to get a seed pod.

That is great news as now I know it can be done here in NZ, he is a bit warmer than here where I will be later getting my plants to re-flowering again after going outside

Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Is that a cross with the kumara?

Richard Watson

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No its either a self or its cross between my #1 and Bbcuzzie. The flowering Kumara for me stopped making flowers as soon as it went outside, and I got one Camote that never stopped making them, I could run out to the garden to gets it number, I'll get it later.
« Last Edit: 2019-12-29, 12:34:19 AM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Well shucks, we need a cross with your old local kind to get new, maybe better adapted offspring. The picture looks like that stem had two or three flowers. The ones with less per stem seem less likely to be self compatible but that is based on some pretty skimpy evidence.
I saw on our news about an ocean surface heat anomaly east of you and looked it up on earthnullschool, it's huge. Wonder how that will effect things.   

Richard Watson

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So my best flowering plant is number 3, this is what I said about it a year ago - This seeding is the smallest but second to open a flower, it didnt like the cool early summer interesting how it took quite a knock the spring before yet this time it never stopped flowering.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

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Well shucks, we need a cross with your old local kind to get new, maybe better adapted offspring. The picture looks like that stem had two or three flowers. The ones with less per stem seem less likely to be self compatible but that is based on some pretty skimpy evidence.

I'm not sure that the Kumara is going to flower for me again, should for Chris though, I reckon he's going to end up with a lot of seed by the end of summer.



I saw on our news about an ocean surface heat anomaly east of you and looked it up on earthnullschool, it's huge. Wonder how that will effect things.   

Yes I saw that, that area could be ideal for increasing the likelihood of low pressure devlopment, meaning cooler air dragged up from the south, also means no smoke from Australia, had quite a bit of that coming over in the last month.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.