Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 7516 times)

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Are there any tricks to the trade when it comes to pollinating these flowers.

I'v used a trimmed down artist brush or Q-tip to just dab around and transfer pollen. Also sometimes I just pluck a flower off one, remove the petals and style and rub it the other flower(s).  I'v never been able to collect much pollen on a surface, that I could see.

The bees love these flowers so much that I don't mess with hand pollinating any more.  The first year I had SP flowers there was little interest from the bees, now they seem to be their favorites, I don't really understand that. 
« Last Edit: 2019-11-09, 02:37:37 PM by reed »

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Gees the flowers dont stay on very long do they, hand pollinated the two flowers twice, so now wait and see if I was successful
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Gees the flowers dont stay on very long do they, hand pollinated the two flowers twice, so now wait and see if I was successful
I forgot to mention that but no they don't. It depends on the weather too, a hot dry morning and they might only last a couple hours. Cooler or cloudy they might stay till afternoon. And how long they stay varies from plant to plant.  Also when they open, some might be open at daylight and some wait a little bit.

Hey, while ya got them inside away form bees you could maybe identify any self compatible ones. You still have to pollinate them too I think cause of how the flower is arranged.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
That's interesting, the first two flowers were open for two days. I'm not going to know the self compatible ones because I'll going around and pollinating all the flowers
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
The same flower stayed open for two days? That's amazing, I bet it's cause they are protected inside. Or have you taken them out already?

Have any that you pollinated dropped the flower leaving the stigma still there? That's the sign I think, that pollination was successful. Seems to me they tend most often to drop off almost immediately after pollination otherwise they just kind of wilt away and fall off leaving nothing but the stem.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Yep, in fact the first flower on Bbcuzzie still on and that must be 5 days now, they are still inside, tempted to keep them there so I can keep working on the flowers, in the mean time ive been taking cuttings,they can be planted outside so I will allow them to be taken advantage of by the bees.
« Last Edit: 2019-11-11, 05:31:54 PM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Just noticed in the first of the Kumara flowers that there's heaps of pollen sitting in the bottom of the flower, so that is handy for when the brush is used, shame its the only flower at the moment, how long is the pollen viable if it was still on the brush
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
I ain't got even a guess on how long the pollen is viable, I suspect not long. You could try pollinating that same flower. Be interesting to know if it is self compatible.
 
Are their there any little capsules developing on the prior flowers?

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
I ain't got even a guess on how long the pollen is viable, I suspect not long. You could try pollinating that same flower. Be interesting to know if it is self compatible.
I'll give it a go and see if it is self compatible, wouldn't think it as there is no history of seed in the past, though Chris reckons it could be a mutation of Owairaka Red,


Are their there any little capsules developing on the prior flowers?
No not yet, but they haven't dropped off so maybe that's a good sign
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
A spent but not pollinated flower generally just falls off so yep, I'd say that's a very good sign.

When you say Kumara you mean your local cloned ones, not the ones from my seeds?

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Yes I will refer to Kumara as the NZ clones. Interesting though the Kumara flower wont make the end of the day, looked lovely at 8.00am, looking weltered at now 3.00pm.
« Last Edit: 2019-11-14, 07:16:59 PM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
First two flowers I tried to hand pollinate drop off, oh well, keep trying.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Karma: 28
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
First two flowers I tried to hand pollinate drop off, oh well, keep trying.

Well shucks, but I'm not worried, ya still got a lot more season to go. I feel pretty confident you'll get seeds this year.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
yep should do. Everything is in the garden now, they were outdoing there pots, so thought bugger ya, you may as well go out. Fulled up the rest of the 6metre bed with lots of cuttings. Chris's kumara had a tuber growing.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.