Author Topic: Ipomoea batatas - breeding of Sweet Potato - Camote clones - New Zealand  (Read 6792 times)

Walt

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Under my conditions, a year-ols sweet potato plant planted in the garden splits and rots, though the above-ground part of the plant looks healthy until frost.  New plants from slips grow and produce well.
Your location or your variety may be quite different.

Richard Watson

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They are looking pretty good to me. The one to the right in the brown pot is the only one that looks a little off, it's color don't look quite right.
That's poor ol Bbcuzzie, only just hung in there during winter, but its growing well and has nice green growth tips that soon turn red/bronze

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Looks like Chris's is one with longer vines rather than bushy.


It was left as a long vine over winter, but you are right, that clone is a vine type that can cover a large area, it had flowers for Chris last summer

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It might be time to chop them up a little and clone some new plants. Don't have enough experience to say 100% for sure but I think I actually get better food harvest from a new clone that an established plant. A new clone grows two or three little roots that form big storage roots with new feeder roots on its other end. An established plant starts out with too many feeder roots and ends up with bunches of little crowded and deformed storage roots.
Remember my goal is all about aiming for seed, not worried about the roots at this stage, I cant see taking off slips now to grow new plants will help me achieve earlier flowering, but I will take cuttings later to share around our FB group.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

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Under my conditions, a year-ols sweet potato plant planted in the garden splits and rots, though the above-ground part of the plant looks healthy until frost.  New plants from slips grow and produce well.
Your location or your variety may be quite different.
Still a bit of learning game for me, but then these were cuttings taken in the autumn, so not sure that will make any difference or not.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Yep, seeds are still most important for me too. The learning game also continues for me as well, lots of questions that may never be answered at least by me.

Too many variables and they are so screwy in both inheritance and mutation any one time for sure observation don't really mean that much.

Chance

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Is anyone selecting for non sweet types?  I would love a non sweet with a great texture.

reed

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I actually prefer the sweet ones, maybe just cause that is what I always thought they were supposed to be but I'm learning to use the non sweet as a substitute for potatoes. I don't really select for or against at this point cause I'm still mostly focused on reliable production from seed.

That said there is a roughly a 50/50 chance that a new one from my seed will be non-sweet. Generally those that are white inside with purple skin are not sweet, kind of weird cause a couple I'v had that were white but also had white skin were sweet.

Richard Watson

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reed-  cant you conform if these are flower buds, looks like it to me.



Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Sure do look like it! How many plants ya got doing it?
« Last Edit: 2019-10-28, 02:42:39 AM by reed »

Richard Watson

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I ask this as I was 99% sure it was and its the NZ kumara from Chris and its covered in buds which is just amazing. All but one of the Comates are developing flowers also, so this is a huge jump on last year that these will go outside with flowers even before the arrival of summer. I'm in no rush to get them out either, I think they are better off in the heat of the tunnelhouse for maybe another month yet.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Sounds like a real big step forward, good luck. I'm sure you know they need bees, even on the chance one is self compatible as some from my seeds might be the flower structure makes selfing unlikely if left on their own. Hand pollinating is real easy though, you'll see as soon as the first flower opens.


Richard Watson

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Thinking more about the Kumara plant and its flower development, its likely that the reason its heavily flowering as its being influenced by the Camote clones next to them, Ive read a paper a few years ago about how plants can do that in that they can trigger other plants into flowering. Also its highly likely that the NZ clones are not self compatible hence why they haven't produced seed before.
« Last Edit: 2019-11-06, 11:52:35 AM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Thinking more about the Kumara plant and its flower development, its likely that the reason its heavily flowering as its being influenced by the Camote clones next to them, Ive read a paper a few years ago about how plants can do that in that they can trigger other plants into flowering.
Those hot purple leaf Americans are making them horny.   
« Last Edit: 2019-11-06, 01:32:23 PM by reed »

Richard Watson

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yer  ;D , noticed you edited it, did you have something rude and then removed it  8)
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Well, ah um, I didn't want to start an international scandal.

Richard Watson

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 The hand pollinating starts today, two Camote plants have flowers open this morning, the Kumara is still a week maybe which is the one I'm looking forward to getting pollen from. Are there any tricks to the trade when it comes to pollinating these flowers.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.