Author Topic: Cooking Section Idea  (Read 1159 times)

William S.

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Cooking Section Idea
« on: 2018-12-04, 09:34:03 PM »
Binge reading Carol Deppes books started with Tao now almost done with Resilient. Looking forward to trying some of her recipes. Seems to me that cooking is part and parcel with plant breeding, gardening, seed saving, and foraging. Really there is a continuum from plant to seed and from plant to plate.

I keep growing exciting new vegetables that I err, take a long time to figure out how to add to my diet. Favas, sunchokes, parsnips, and turnips are all things that are growing really well for me that I should eat or eat more of. The root vegetables tend to get roasted in a roasted vegetable dish my wife likes.

Would like to grow some others like I am sitting on a packet grex packet of Okra seed from a seed trade. I heard recently you can dry farm it in Eastern Montana. Just bought some freeze dried okra at Trader Joes. So I guess I have tried it now. Okra isn't part of my food culture- yet.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #1 on: 2018-12-04, 11:27:44 PM »
Well, I've been bingeing on vegetable cookbooks.

Martha Stewart  devised a salad of lettuce, medjool dates and strips of raw parsnip.
I haven't tried it yet.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

William S.

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #2 on: 2018-12-05, 12:10:38 AM »
Well, I've been bingeing on vegetable cookbooks.

Martha Stewart  devised a salad of lettuce, medjool dates and strips of raw parsnip.
I haven't tried it yet.

Found a couple at a thrift store recently. Most excited about "Cooking from the Garden Creative Gardening and Contemporary Cuisine" by Rosalind Creasy 1988
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Oxbow Farm

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #3 on: 2018-12-05, 10:34:23 AM »
I would be very interested in a cooking section.  It would be really informative to get cooking discussions from plant breeders.  So many recipes treat the vegetables as universally substitutes, any pepper or potato is as good as any other.  This is not the case in my experience. 

I'd love it if Carol did a video on making her Universal Skillet Cornbread.  I've tried that recipe many times and it has never come out the way she describes in Resilent Gardener, and I cannot figure out what is going on.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #4 on: 2018-12-05, 10:49:02 AM »
We don't need a lot of recipes, but a mention of taste is important.  Carol does this - if a dry bean is tasteless, she writes that.  So many bean growers are enchanted with the markings on the seeds - maybe they make necklaces with them instead of eating them.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Doro

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #5 on: 2018-12-05, 11:42:35 AM »
A cooking section would be nice! There are a lot of unique uses for certain varieties and it's always good to learn new things.
My skills of preparing corn are pathetic, it has little food history here, but I'd enjoy learning more things to do with it.
On the other hand I can share plenty of dishes with roots, potatoes, peas or brassicas. Sometimes I think that's all I eat in winter ;) made some peabread today and there will be root mash and fish for dinner.

William S.

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #6 on: 2018-12-05, 01:19:45 PM »
We don't need a lot of recipes, but a mention of taste is important.  Carol does this - if a dry bean is tasteless, she writes that.  So many bean growers are enchanted with the markings on the seeds - maybe they make necklaces with them instead of eating them.

I need to taste all the things Carol talks about the taste of to see if my tongue can detect the things she speaks of or can be trained to.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Oxbow Farm

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #7 on: 2018-12-05, 02:43:01 PM »
Doro,  I want that pea bread recipe you mentioned in one of your videos!

Andrew Barney

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #8 on: 2018-12-05, 03:09:58 PM »
At first I wasn't sure a cooking section would be all that interesting,  but now I'm sold after reading all the comments.  I'm down for a cooking section. I can share Søren's (toad) ancient grey pea soup that makes its own gravy from his blog.  I tried using Biskopens Grært (Bishops grey pea aka. Swedish red) as the pea in my version but it must not have been the right kind of starchy pea.

I also have several international cookbooks in Esperanto that I could translate.

Carol's cooking instructions on Orange popping garbanzo beans (chick peas) would be interesting. Also Joseph's skillet butternut squash.

Doro

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #9 on: 2018-12-06, 02:54:58 AM »
Tim, I'll take some notes and actually weigh ingredients next time when baking, so I can share the how-to. I make three different peabreads ;) a flat dry one, a soft sweet flat one and a sourdough pea bred. But there are tons of different ways to make bread with them, in the old times peas were used to stretch out the expensive flour. The half high varieties grew on every field together with oats, rye, broad beans and even potatoes, but with mechanic harvesting they disappeared mostly.

Andrew, Biskopens gråärt (the letter æ is Norwegian and Danish btw, we do not have it in Swedish) is a tall garden variety and mostly used fresh. But can be used dried i.e. when you get sick of harvesting peas in summer, they are left to mature and dry for picking them later. Since it has wrinkly seeds it's ground to flour then and used for baking. Only the round dried peas (usually yellow ones) are traditionally used for making soup here.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #10 on: 2018-12-06, 05:58:14 AM »
.

Andrew, Biskopens gråärt (the letter æ is Norwegian and Danish btw, we do not have it in Swedish) is a tall garden variety and mostly used fresh. But can be used dried i.e. when you get sick of harvesting peas in summer, they are left to mature and dry for picking them later. Since it has wrinkly seeds it's ground to flour then and used for baking. Only the round dried peas (usually yellow ones) are traditionally used for making soup here.

Thanks Doro,

I was going off of memory mostly.  I know the original from the nordic seed bank had two different names,  one of which just had the ärt, which means pea as i understand. But thanks for the clarification. I imagine the nordic languages overlap some but are different.

Here is the grey pea soup recipe. I don't think these are yellow peas,  as they are both brownish-green and also make gravy. I suppose they could have yellow cotelydons underneath the seed coat. But regardless I found Biskopens to not be suitable for that recipe. I'd like to know how to identity ones that are.

Mine are not wrinkly, mostly round with dimples. So mostly a starchy pea, not sweet. But perhaps the wrong kind of starchy pea. But I have wondered if it would be good for pea flour and bread.

https://toads.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/grey-peas/
« Last Edit: 2018-12-06, 06:01:18 AM by Andrew Barney »

Doro

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #11 on: 2018-12-06, 10:10:41 AM »
The nordic languages overlap a lot. I also get to talk to many Danish and Norwegian people at work, so I get good practice and understand most things just fine.

Grey peas (gråärt) is our word for peas with coloured flowers, pisum arvense.
Blåärt (blue peas) is the same thing just being more specific about blue pod colour.
There are lots of historic pisum arvense varieties preserved in Scandinavia, with round peas, pimpled peas and really wrinkly ones. Normally just the perfectly round ones get used for soup. Dimpled varieties might be ok too, depending on the variety / degree of dimples, but they have a tendency to stay chewy.
Yellow colour is favoured for soup just because it looks nice and is mild creamy in taste. Dark peas can be flavouful aka bitter.
Biskopens gråärt is likely too dimpled already to have enough starch for gravy. Dimpled varieties have many nuances in starch/sugar levels.
I have not grown the Danish variety from the link, but from looking at the peas and the soup I think it is green inside and the seed coat gets tan/light brown when aging. If you can find a look alike arvense variety with slight dimples you should get close in taste and look. I'll sure try to make that soup if I find a suitable variety.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #12 on: 2018-12-06, 12:28:11 PM »

Grey peas (gråärt) is our word for peas with coloured flowers, pisum arvense.
Blåärt (blue peas) is the same thing just being more specific about blue pod colour.
There are lots of historic pisum arvense varieties preserved in Scandinavia, with round peas, pimpled peas and really wrinkly ones. Normally just the perfectly round ones get used for soup. Dimpled varieties might be ok too, depending on the variety / degree of dimples, but they have a tendency to stay chewy.
Yellow colour is favoured for soup just because it looks nice and is mild creamy in taste. Dark peas can be flavouful aka bitter.
Biskopens gråärt is likely too dimpled already to have enough starch for gravy. Dimpled varieties have many nuances in starch/sugar levels.
I have not grown the Danish variety from the link, but from looking at the peas and the soup I think it is green inside and the seed coat gets tan/light brown when aging. If you can find a look alike arvense variety with slight dimples you should get close in taste and look. I'll sure try to make that soup if I find a suitable variety.

Thanks,  that makes a lot of sense actually.  I think they were sorta chewy now that I think of it. I might have some that could work,  I just need to think about it.

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #13 on: 2018-12-06, 08:34:38 PM »
We don't need a lot of recipes, but a mention of taste is important.  Carol does this - if a dry bean is tasteless, she writes that.  So many bean growers are enchanted with the markings on the seeds - maybe they make necklaces with them instead of eating them.
Im guilty of that.... ;D
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Ferdzy

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Re: Cooking Section Idea
« Reply #14 on: 2019-02-09, 08:47:20 AM »
Late to this thread but just a reminder (or info to anyone who doesn't know) but I do write a recipe blog. I'm sure 99% of my readers use whatever produce they can get at the grocery store so I try not to be too specific, but once in a while I do come up with something that is best with a specific variety. Not sure how I would refer them to readers here.