Author Topic: Adapting plants to new climates  (Read 1685 times)

B. Copping

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Re: Adapting plants to new climates
« Reply #30 on: 2019-01-26, 02:11:30 PM »

The place that has most surprized me, where my seeds tend to do well, is in hot climates. My varieties are so short-season, that they spring out of the ground, produce a crop, and die before the bugs/diseases pressures  take them out. Growing seed from my varieties in a hot/humid environment is likely to result in rapid local adaptation. Can they legitimately be called "Lofthouse" if the seed has been grown where the climate, soil, or farming practices are so dramatically different than my own?


Lofthouse: Miami
Lofthouse: New York
?
 :P
 ;D

I am quite fond of “Damifino” followed by a descriptive name.
Useful in my spreadsheet for those varieties that come to me without names.

Mike Jennings

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Re: Adapting plants to new climates
« Reply #31 on: 2019-01-31, 10:17:28 PM »
Mike, One specific variety I wanted to tackle is NSS Rancho Marquess land race moschata. I actually bought a packet and planted with Loft house land race but I planted too late in 2018 because of rototiller and time issues. I think it would be easier to start some of these adaptation projects in the south and ship part of the F2 North.

This is an interspecies tomato thought but there are several tomato species that grow OK in California but not without extreme intervention here. Crossing such a species to a short season tomato accession from the north such as Big Hill would be a huge boon for northern breeders. Though embryo rescue might be necessary.

William, I would be interested in helping to cross the Rancho Marques with the Lofthouse Landrace! Speaking of mottling on moschata squash, I have an interesting one that I grew last summer (pictured below). This is the F1 fruit (containing F2 seeds) of Thai Rai Kaw Tok crossed with some type of butternut. The pollen donor could have been a Lofthouse squash, but I can't be certain. I could send you some of those F2 seeds, if you'd like -- though I haven't actually opened any of them yet.

Which wild tomato species were you thinking of that would grow well in CA? I would be willing to give a try to crossing them with a short season variety. I have fresh seeds of Big Hill, Brad, Forest Fire, and Silvery Fir Tree as possible candidates. I've no experience with embryo rescue, but I would like to learn that technique. My original S. habrochaites plant that I grew in 2017 still seems to be alive, BTW :) 

William S.

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Re: Adapting plants to new climates
« Reply #32 on: 2019-02-01, 12:24:18 AM »
William, I would be interested in helping to cross the Rancho Marques with the Lofthouse Landrace! Speaking of mottling on moschata squash, I have an interesting one that I grew last summer (pictured below). This is the F1 fruit (containing F2 seeds) of Thai Rai Kaw Tok crossed with some type of butternut. The pollen donor could have been a Lofthouse squash, but I can't be certain. I could send you some of those F2 seeds, if you'd like -- though I haven't actually opened any of them yet.

Which wild tomato species were you thinking of that would grow well in CA? I would be willing to give a try to crossing them with a short season variety. I have fresh seeds of Big Hill, Brad, Forest Fire, and Silvery Fir Tree as possible candidates. I've no experience with embryo rescue, but I would like to learn that technique. My original S. habrochaites plant that I grew in 2017 still seems to be alive, BTW :)

That ThaI Rai Kow Tok F1 is cool! It looks like it could be piled with the Rancho Marques landrace! Would love some of the F2 seed contained within!

Happy to have your help with the Rancho Marques x Loft house project!

The wild tomato I have most specifically in mind is the LA 1932 strain of Solanum chilense from the Tomato Genetics Research Center at Davis. It has been recorded as having as many as 0.8 viable hybrid seeds per fruit in hybridization attempt's with domestic in past research which Tom Wagner documented and linked to on his forum. That means 8 viable seeds per ten attempts with it as the male pollen donor. Crossed with Big Hill it could be the perfect bridge to bring the Peruvianum complex into useability for us northern short season folk. I plan to try to grow it as a greenhouse and houseplant population in 2019, but I am not sure it will work here! It works at Davis so would probably work great for you. They grow 50 plants in something like ten two gallon pots so it's not a huge space hog as a project. Also growing two S. arcanum accessions also mentioned in the article. Got two potentially viable looking seeds from my late fall attempt at hybridizing Peruvianum and domestic but they did not germinate. Should have done embryo rescue but was to busy.

It's cool your habrochaites is still alive. Tim Peters tried to breed a perrenial tomato from hab. There is an old thread about it on homegrown goodness somewhere.

Some of my 2018 tomatoes are still alive but only because I dug them up and they've been sitting in pots in my basement not blooming all winter do far! So no more interspecies peruvianum hybrids for me until they can be set outside in the spring!
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Adapting plants to new climates
« Reply #33 on: 2019-08-09, 01:05:52 PM »
My first few Moshatas are forming. I have two and only two Rancho Marques plants and with no fruit yet. I mixed together the Thai squash, Lofthouse, and Autumn's choice.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Adapting plants to new climates
« Reply #34 on: 2019-08-18, 10:01:00 PM »
Looks to me like Long of Naples influenced Lofthouse Moschata is going to produce a lot of fruit. Not sure yet if anything new will. Though pollen donation is possible.

Good chance Solanum chilense will not set a fruit for me this year.

Solanum arcanum has set fruit and decent chance will get a seed harvest.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A