Author Topic: Frost and Cold Tolerant Tomato Breeding including epigenetic and regular genetic  (Read 446 times)

William S.

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I like red tomatoes fine, and yellow ones, and green ones, and bicolor ones, and orange ones, and fruity tomatillos, ground cherries, and tomatoes with new flavors like Brad Gate's Amethyst Cream. So I suspect I will like many of the new flavors Joseph finds for us but still eat some ordinary red ones too. I even like the ice cube flavored ones taco bell chops up and serves on their tacos.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Lauren

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As always, I started my tomatoes in regular garden soil, without bottom heat or supplemental lighting. As usual, some croaked. Every year I start them in a similar way and plant out under wall-o-water in March or April. Whether epigenetics or genetics, they seldom die in the spring any more. Those that do I simply replace.

I selected the first to come up, the subset that got secondary leaves while still in dim light (sunny windowsill, no supplemental lighting), and the best of those are now in my garden under milk jugs. Even with snow on the ground they're not complaining. One of the six is easily twice as tall as the rest and I'll be keeping an eye on it. Those six will be my seed tomatoes this year. Two of the other plants have been eliminated--one nearly died when it didn't get watered for a couple days, and the other was covered with aphids in the greenhouse.

Last year I was given a handful of plants. They had a very small survival rate under the same conditions. I think I ended up with fruit on two out of the ten. I was given two tomato plants this year. One croaked in the greenhouse, the other is out under a wall-o-water and getting frost damage even there.

Once I have the spring thing settled, I'll start working on autumn frost tolerance. I have noticed that the plants are much hardier than the fruit. The first frost of the season might not even touch the plants but the fruit bites the dust.

William S.

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Currently watching seedlings germinate in cool soil. Solanum peruvianum, S. Pimpinillifolium, and S. Penelli  x domestic have won the germination race.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Chance

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Joseph, do you like acidic flavors in your tomatoes also, or more just sweet and umami?