Author Topic: Tomato Journal  (Read 770 times)

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #45 on: 2021-06-03, 02:35:06 PM »
I think my first two attempted crosses of the year Mission mountain sunrise x big hill may have taken.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #46 on: 2021-06-03, 10:00:42 PM »
I carefully interplanting the clumps of LA2329 Solanum habrochaites with bicolors from the promiscuous project. Something, probably mammalian is eating them. I found one decapitated, another 3/4 chewed through at the base, and a few more just missing.

Interestingly whatever it is, probably a vole or mouse, is leaving the LA2329 alone. Understandable. Strong smelling accession. Someone mentioned deer resistant? Or some such. Might not just be insects it repels.

Hopefully it will miss one promiscuous bicolor.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #47 on: 2021-06-03, 10:37:48 PM »
Also seperately direct seeded promiscuous bicolors have spotty germination especially on the sand layer. Found a clump of two half eaten in one area and what looked like perhaps flea beetles in the area.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #48 on: 2021-06-05, 01:32:17 PM »
Found the best volunteer tomatoes of the year. In the wrong field. Have promptly pulled them up and stuck them in a pot to replant in the slushy field.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #49 on: 2021-06-05, 02:13:19 PM »
Moved my two hairy habrochaites seedlings into the garden a few days ago along with some other seedlings. Didn't harden these ones off. Some appear to have gotten scorched. The hairy habrochaites and a few others don't seem to care about the lighting change due to how young they are.

Some tomato seedlings are also sprouting in pots - so I have some more pimpinellifolium and habrochaites now. They shouldn't get scorched.

Wildlings are beginning to recover from the heat - some others are slowly recovering.

Steph S

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #50 on: 2021-06-11, 06:54:09 AM »
Went to freezing yesterday and snowed, about 2 cm on ground here June 10.  ::)  Greenhouse low was only 44F though so tomatoes were not affected. 
I've been noticing that the exserted stigma seems to be an inconsistent trait.  Some flowers show it and others don't on the same plant. 
Exsertion showed up yesterday in the F1 involving PI120256.  Have not seen it on any of the other flowers. Perhaps this is due to the extreme heat of a couple of days ago?  No idea, just a wild guess.

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #51 on: 2021-06-11, 07:29:43 AM »
34 F here this early morning. Yes exserted is a fickle trait and could be multi causal but definitely has environmental influences. I sort of have a mental mode of some plants having a good exsertion trait and other varieties a fickle trait and I mentally break it up into multiple qualitative amounts of exsertion. There are plants with stigma level to the anther cone tip and a gradient out to some pretty extreme exsertion. I suspect some of it is multiple traits and some single dose vs. Double dose genes. In my intentionally exserted varieties that plant would be a cull as I would figure it for single dose. In more casual areas like my slushy garden it would be quite welcome.
« Last Edit: 2021-06-11, 07:33:14 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #52 on: 2021-06-11, 01:26:33 PM »
No frost damage. Planted the rest of the tomatoes in the greenhouse. Ground is nice and wet from the rain.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #53 on: 2021-06-13, 09:50:35 PM »
Both of the tomatoes on two different plants are retaining the tomatoes from the flowers I emasculated and crossed. Potato leaf Mission Mountain Sunrise Blue bicolor is the mother and Big Hill the father. Very excited for this cross. My goal is a exserted potato leaf blue bicolor.
« Last Edit: 2021-06-13, 10:47:00 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #54 on: 2021-06-14, 05:01:16 AM »
Wow, William that has to be the most exotic tomato ever.  :)  Looking forward to the pics of ripe fruit.

William S.

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #55 on: 2021-06-14, 09:59:40 PM »
Long way to ripe. Also a bit upside down in the picture. Fruit wise the Mission Mountain Sunrise is alot like the Brad Gates Blue Gold variety it is descended from. Just smaller. The exciting thing to me is how short season it is.

Once I get the exserted stigma fixed with my Big Hill cross my next move will probably be to cross with exserted tiger for the stripes. Work keeps me busy this time of year. So weekends are all about weeding. Hopefully some crosses are happening via proximity. I have a big hill, mission mountain sunrise, and exserted tiger in a clump. Then around them are the LA2329 and promiscuous bicolors. Would be nice to find some natural crosses from that.

I have some big hill seed direct seeded that was from plants in the matrix of things in 2018 and 2019. I hope some fun F1's show up out of it.
« Last Edit: 2021-06-14, 10:06:29 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #56 on: 2021-06-15, 07:44:02 PM »
I am getting a space heater next year for the basement. In previous years it hasn't been very cold in the early spring / late winter, nor did it snow much.

This time it actually got cold enough to stunt everything.

Some tomatoes are thankfully recovering.

Steph S

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Re: Tomato Journal
« Reply #57 on: 2021-06-15, 07:54:52 PM »
Ten plants got moved out of the greenhouse here yesterday.  Nine are in a shelter, one just tied up to the side of a pea trellis in a sheltered area.  These are in 3 to 5 gallon pots so I'm aiming to keep them alive and produce some tomatoes, not a selection for frost this time.  Just couldn't keep the greenhouse so crowded any longer.   The low last night was 43F with a supposed risk of frost but we didn't see any frost here.  All the plants were fine.   Currently 40 F and misty.   TS Bill will be blowing past tomorrow, some rain and wind, but nights this week will be warmer after that, at least forecast to be 50F+. 
I chose plants which had not grown any fruit yet, and put those out.  Some are less tolerant of crowding or of greenhouse temperature and relative humidity extremes - or they may need more of a shaking to make good sets.  Either way the plants that go out fruitless usually set up quickly outdoors.  These are all being assessed for fruit quality, so if anything turns out to be special I can make room later in the season and bring the selected plant(s) inside for selfed seed or crossing purposes.