Author Topic: Solanum pennellii  (Read 2437 times)

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #15 on: 2019-08-30, 08:02:22 PM »
Google quickly found a pdf article for me with a 2007 study. "Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Lycopersicon pennellii"

Sounds like they found something useful, however they suggested combining it with other known traits from hirsutum and pimpinillifolium. Also it's quite probable it's not in all pennellii.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

ImGrimmer

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #16 on: 2019-08-31, 12:37:55 AM »
Thanks! Do you have personal experience with your plants?

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #17 on: 2019-08-31, 04:37:14 AM »
No Phytophthera infestens only happens rarely here. When it does it affects the local seed potato industry and gets in the news. 
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #18 on: 2019-08-31, 07:41:56 AM »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Natasha Flue

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #19 on: 2019-08-31, 03:59:04 PM »
https://lateblight-rs1.climate.ncsu.edu/2019-map/

Wonder how updated this map is.

That's pretty up to date. Latest report listed is 8/27 and there's probably going to be more reports listed in the next week.

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #20 on: 2020-02-06, 07:39:57 PM »
In 2019 I got lots of seed back despite a lot of sterile plants among the F3s. That mostly penellii plant, the three way, and the F1 all produced a lot. The F3s produced some.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #21 on: 2020-05-12, 10:07:28 PM »
Last year Joseph Lofthouse sent me a packet from a penellii plant he grew isolated from other penellii plants but exposed to penellii hybrids and other tomato species. Somehow I managed to grow one clump and because the roots are fragile I only transplanted it as a clump and only one plant from the clump bloomed. It grew with penellii hybrids (from Andrew Barney). Presumably those were the pollen parents. I've been calling it "purish penellii"

One alternate possibility is that they self. I can't completely rule that out yet.

I did plant the remaining original packet.

I also planted some truly pure penellii also from Joseph. It's doing great too.

Thanks to years of Josephs grow outs I would say that Solanum penellii genetics are quickly becoming useable for northern breeders. These plants are quite vigorous without special soil or particularly special care. Other than I do not transplant them roughly.

It also represents a smidgeon of a road not traveled for me because potentially I could do a really huge grow out of these genetics. Why no leaf segregegation yet? Should I simply grow many more plants? Should I just seed a flat thickly to look for leaf segregation?

For now I think I will save my large envelope of 2019 seed. Also save seed from 2020. I'm sure it will be interesting to keep growing this line. Hopefully fruit characters will be variable.
« Last Edit: 2020-05-12, 10:10:38 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #22 on: 2020-05-13, 01:58:27 AM »
Last summer there was one plant among my Solanum pennellii that had fruits that were dramatically larger than is typical for my variety. I saved seeds from them, and planted them with the rest this spring.
« Last Edit: 2020-05-13, 02:00:15 AM by Joseph Lofthouse »

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #23 on: 2020-05-13, 12:24:52 PM »
Here is my Peruvianum x Penellii pot newly transplanted.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #24 on: 2020-05-13, 12:37:52 PM »
One other thought I've had is that as the Penellii germplasm seems to be rapidly improving in adaptedness and vigour it gets more and more useful. Maybe making the desirability of peruvianum or arcanum or chilense less.
« Last Edit: 2020-05-13, 06:16:55 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Andrew Barney

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #25 on: 2020-05-13, 11:50:59 PM »
I still really like peruvianum. I wonder if there are any peruvianum introgression lines. I planted Joseph's improved peruvianum and fairy hollow mixed with best wild. I also have another planting of the seeds I saved from that suspected habrochiates x pimpinellifolium cross. I'll get what I get from the wilds this year, but hopefully something good.

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #26 on: 2020-05-14, 12:38:54 AM »
"Some of the introgressions are quite large according to the article. A common one from Peruvianum is ToMV resistance to tobacco mosaic virus which comprises about 70% of chromosome 9."

Quote from myself and what was that resistance in that other penellii x line you sent me last year Andrew?! Yep ToMV you said it yourself earlier in this thread! A big little chunk of Peruvianum is floating around in one of my big packets of penellii x domestic from last year.
« Last Edit: 2020-05-14, 09:32:00 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Andrew Barney

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #27 on: 2020-05-14, 11:21:29 PM »
i couldn't find any evidence of available introgression lines for S. peruvianum, but i did find several in grin and tgrc of F1 hybrids that i didn't know existed. I think i may request them. I found a research paper that mentioned something about pseudo F2's. I am assuming these pseudo filial lines are based on the fact that peruvianum is self incompatible and they needed to breed the various hybrids together maybe.

I'm under the impression the closest relatives that peruvianum might cross to are chilense and chmielewskii (though arcanum is in the same group as chmielewskii). William weren't you growing arcanum? I think i originally wasnt interested in it, but i think i may be now. I really want to work with chmielewskii now though.

William S.

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Re: Solanum pennellii
« Reply #28 on: 2020-05-14, 11:34:32 PM »
Yep the two lines of Arcanum grew great G2 is planted. Supposed to produce 0.2 seeds per pollination of domestic. So five pollination per each seed. These two accessions supposed to not work with Peruvianum though. However, all indications are it's a lovely species to work with in its own right.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days