Author Topic: Salsify  (Read 2604 times)

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #60 on: 2019-06-06, 11:57:41 PM »
Scorzonera has such a different pattern.

Ive got two bolting wild Salsify plants trying to flower atm, now that we are into winter they will not be one that I would be added to the batch I'll be using
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #61 on: 2019-06-07, 11:14:21 AM »
Thanks for the insight into shorter growing season and overwintering and spring harvest.
I can’t stand the taste of parsnip until after frost.
Are the roots harvested in the second growing season still sweet?

If they behave like parsnip, my winter should not harm them. Taste could even be improved (more sweetness) by freezing.
That's what I'm expecting and hoping for :)

If the salsify behaves like carrots or radish though... I'll find soggy mush and rootshaped holes in spring. Fingers crossed that it's not going to happen.

The Scorzonera that I planted last year seem very hardy.
It sneered at frost, and was the last plant to stay green in the garden last fall.
The foliage emerged about the same time as my garlic.
I can see why this plant was/is used for early salad greens!
No idea if it will behave as biennial or a perennial yet.

Not all the wild salsify survived last winter, but then, neither did the sage, thyme, and most of the pennyroyal.
So it is possible that the scorzonera is more winterhardy than the wild salsify.
I’m also comparing apples and oranges, of course. ;)

I’ll be planting my salsify seeds soon.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #62 on: 2019-06-07, 02:58:23 PM »
The parsnips stay sweet during a long time in spring. They become less sweet again when night frosts are over. By then the flower stalks are developing and the roots are getting woody. I stop eating the last ones middle of May most years.
I like savoury autumn parsnip, but it has a more narrow use in the kitchen than sweet spring parsnip. Have you tried eating the autumn parsnip in stews, casseroles or with oven roasted chicken/duck? That's my favourite ways of using it :)

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #63 on: 2019-06-09, 08:08:19 PM »
Salsify is the frist of the winter roots crops to dig-select and replant for spring. From the 30+ plants 7 were chosen which had the best tap roots, one plant was also chosen just for its share size 8cm diameter, thought it might help maintain vigor.

Sorry not the best photo, winter sun is not the best for getting good shots.
« Last Edit: 2019-06-09, 08:10:42 PM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #64 on: 2019-06-10, 03:44:13 AM »
Do you go ahead and replant them right away?

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #65 on: 2019-06-10, 01:21:25 PM »
Yep, but I couldn't go and redo the photo. There were two bolters trying to produce flowers also, the frosts we have been having have killed off the buds, not that I wanted to take seed from these anyway. Still, happy with crop and to have found a few reasonable carrot/parsnip type tap roots, the rest of the crop had lots of lateral roots. Oh well, this is the first time doing any selection work with Salsify, will be interesting to see if there's any improvement in the next generation.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #66 on: 2019-06-16, 09:06:17 AM »
Scorzonera flower.
It was rainy yesterday, so they stayed open longer than usual.

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #67 on: 2019-06-16, 02:07:57 PM »
Must try and grow some Scorzonera too.

A Salsify that I biffed in the roasting pan last night, happy with the width bit its the length I want to work
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #68 on: 2019-06-18, 03:25:48 PM »
I haven’t googled the identity yet, but I think this is the third flower in two days, judging by the damage so far.

Tragopogon pratensis (Wild salsify), and vegetarian enthusiast.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #69 on: 2019-07-05, 06:42:39 AM »
Two of my salsify rows are left, the third row had such poor germination that I removed them and replaced with something else.
The Italian scorzobianca is to the right and the Swedish seed are to the left. They got remarkably different leafs and the Italian one seems to grow a lot better.

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #70 on: 2019-07-05, 09:28:33 AM »
Here is my little salsify patch as of today. Not sure what to do with it now. We got probably at least another 90 days of season with much of it likely hot and dry. I'v watered it a couple times recently and am going to mulch with semi-rotted wood chips. Tempted to dig up a couple and see what they look/taste like but afraid they might not survive being replanted right now and I do want seeds next year. A lot of perennial things here will dry down and go dormant this time of year, wonder how this will handle it.

The wild yellow flowers kind bloomed quite awhile back and I'v collected bunches of seed. I think I'll plant some a little later this year and then some more next spring.
« Last Edit: 2019-07-05, 09:30:36 AM by reed »

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #71 on: 2019-07-05, 01:33:23 PM »
reed - they are doing so well, you should get some good sized roots.

Doro - having never grown scorzobianca I will be keen to read what you think the difference in the taste is.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #72 on: 2019-07-05, 09:47:12 PM »
Two of my salsify rows are left, the third row had such poor germination that I removed them and replaced with something else.
The Italian scorzobianca is to the right and the Swedish seed are to the left. They got remarkably different leafs and the Italian one seems to grow a lot better.

The “Scorzobianca” looks like Scorzonera hispanica to me.
I recall reading somewhere that scorzonera translates as “rough black root”
I didn’t realize that there might be a variety with a white skin. (Scorz-bianco/nera)
It will be interesting to see what the root colour is.

Purple Salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius) young plants in my garden.
Yes, that is Purslane in between the rows....it’s finally warm enough that it germinated.

Edit: Sept. 1; Added third picture.
« Last Edit: 2019-09-02, 12:18:23 PM by B. Copping »

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #73 on: 2019-07-05, 10:55:57 PM »
Did you sow the Purslane or does it volunteer in your garden
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #74 on: 2019-07-06, 02:44:26 AM »
Scorzobianca is just the Italian word for regular salsify, Tragopogon porrifolius. So it should be the same as the swedish seed... at least that's what the seed pack said. Autumn will tell what it is ;D I'd not be unhappy if it's actually black salsify, Scorzonera hispanica. I sowed that too, but with this difficult spring nothing came up in those rows.