Author Topic: Salsify  (Read 2314 times)

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #45 on: 2019-05-09, 02:14:23 PM »
I reckon I could dig up a wild plant or two to see what the root looks like, but I suppose it wouldn't be good to eat being in it's second season? Also just thought if there are non-blooming first year plants they should be nearby. Think I'll take along a shovel over the weekend ans see what I find.

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #46 on: 2019-05-09, 02:54:35 PM »
Ive not wanted to stop to check the roadside plants till now, though it would be interesting to see how well the root would turn out from wild seed if grown in my free draining deep soil instead the hard dry road side soils.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #47 on: 2019-05-10, 05:45:48 AM »
I'm all about adopting anything wild that can be food. I don't even care if it isn't the biggest or best, if it grows without help and all I go to do is harvest it then I want all I can get. And like you say if it grows at all in the nasty gravel along roads it might do real good with a little cultivation. Actually though the biggest patch I'm watching is well off the road competing with tall grass and other weeds, that's the patch I where I hope to find some first year plants to dig up. I'll just collect seeds form the roadside plants.

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #48 on: 2019-05-30, 04:25:40 PM »
The wild yellow flowered salsify is about blooming so should be able to collect seed pretty soon. There is a lot of it and some is actually in easy walking distance, toms more here and there along the roads. I dug up one small plant to see what the roots looked like. Not much too it, maybe five inches long about as big as a pencil. O'well I still want to give it a go in the garden.

My patch from Richard's seeds is looking pretty good I think.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #49 on: 2019-05-31, 01:43:21 AM »
They look very happy and healthy and they are huge plants already!
Mine are super thin and just about the length of a finger. I sowed mine right when the soil had thawed, they eventually sprouted fine and also survived late snowfall and frosts without any issues. No pests on them at all so far, it's a flea beetle and aphid year here, they are everywhere except on the salsify.
But I am getting the feeling that salsify will be a spring crop for me. I don't think they will be ready to harvest before my soil freezes in October.

I am also noticing big differences is growth between the three different seed packages I sowed. In viability of seed and growth. The pack from Italy had expired months ago, just got it because it was discounted so much that it was basicly free. Did not expect many plants from it, but viability was still better than the packs from two different Swedish seed sources (Mammoth Sandwich Island and an unnamed salsify). Also the Italian one is 2cm taller than the other two, in just about ~3 weeks of growth. It could mean that the Italian ones are more domestic than the other two.

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #50 on: 2019-05-31, 02:51:02 AM »
Looking good alright reed.

Doro- cant see why you wont get goods roots from now till October. If you could get seed from the Italian variety would be worth carrying on with.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #51 on: 2019-05-31, 03:29:20 AM »
I'll probably only dig a root or two, just to see how big it got and to sample it for flavor. I want to leave most of mine to go to seed next year.

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #52 on: 2019-05-31, 03:53:51 AM »
Could do what I'm going to do soon and it is dig em up and replant the best roots.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #53 on: 2019-05-31, 03:03:40 PM »
It could be ready in autumn if we get a decent summer Richard. But it looks like a short cold growing season this year, so I'm not sure. There is not much info around on how salsify behaves in my growing zone, but the few things I found were indicating that a spring harvest might give better results here. I will check the root size in autumn, if it's too small I might even measure some and see if/how much they grow until spring harvest.
Spring harvested parsnip can grow a lot compared to their autumn size, salsify could behave similar.

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #54 on: 2019-06-01, 01:23:05 PM »
Dont follow what you mean spring and autumn harvesting as to when you sow those seeds
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #55 on: 2019-06-01, 03:28:40 PM »
What I meant was that salsify might be a crop that takes a year to give a decent harvest in my climate. They seem to need a lot of growing time to make a thicker root.
I had my last frost mid May, first frost can be mid August in a bad year and soil is usually frozen rock solid October to April. That's  probably not long or warm enough to grow more than a toothpick sized root.
I sow in spring as soon as the soil thaws. But if the roots are too thin in autumn I will just leave them in the soil over the winter and harvest next spring as late as possible, shortly before they go to flower.
I do the same with some parsnip roots. I don't harvest them all in autumn. Some are left in the soil during winter and harvested the following spring. They bulk up more and grow each time it's warm enough. I thought that was a common technique, but maybe it isn't?

Richard Watson

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #56 on: 2019-06-01, 10:58:40 PM »
I get what you mean now.

So the frozen soil doesn't effect the roots then.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Doro

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #57 on: 2019-06-02, 01:41:05 AM »
If they behave like parsnip, my winter should not harm them. Taste could even be improved (more sweetness) by freezing.
That's what I'm expecting and hoping for :)

If the salsify behaves like carrots or radish though... I'll find soggy mush and rootshaped holes in spring. Fingers crossed that it's not going to happen.

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #58 on: 2019-06-06, 09:39:52 PM »
Scorzonera about to flower:

[BLACK SALSIFY (Scorzonera; Spanish Salsify; Viper's Grass; Black Oyster Plant)]
« Last Edit: 2019-06-06, 09:47:30 PM by B. Copping »

B. Copping

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Re: Salsify
« Reply #59 on: 2019-06-06, 09:45:00 PM »
Wild Salsify (Tragopogon pratensis) about to flower:


[Wild Salsify (Meadow Salsify; Jack-Go-To-Bed-At-Noon; Goat's Beard; Barbe de bouc; Barbouzet; Salsifis: des prés, sauvage, bâtard, d'Orient)]

In the background you can see the Scorzonera flower stalk (behind the Oenothera biennis).
« Last Edit: 2019-06-06, 09:52:33 PM by B. Copping »