Author Topic: Good Tomato material for dehybridization  (Read 895 times)

Nicollas

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Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« on: 2018-11-25, 11:47:02 PM »
From https://frogsleapfarm.blogspot.com/2018/11/introgression-of-traits-from-commercial.html

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The best of these new hybrids tasted as good as or better than our best heirloom-derived lines, with generally improved fruit quality characteristics.  The first generation hybrids are cherry to saladette size Ė larger fruited types are a year or two behind.  The initial crosses were designed to generate breeding lines segregating for fruit color and stripes, so a diversity in fruit color, shape and size will be available in these new hybrid products.

In parallel we have been working on improving shelf life by selection per se, and by incorporating mutant alleles of RIN or NOR - key genes regulating fruit ripening in tomatoes.  Extended shelf life (XSL reference) will be a key feature of several of our new Cream of the Crop TomatoTMmultiple pest resistant hybrids. 

So this seems good material to select for disease resistances and flavor. Or to use as parent to cross with heirloom tomatoes.

Some lines are available, and have won AAS awards : https://awhaley.com/product-tag/cream-of-the-crop/

Andrew Barney

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #1 on: 2018-11-26, 06:06:03 AM »
Frogsleap farm made an announcement that they were retiring, so I wonder how easy it is to even get those lines now.

But even so, i am slightly sceptical if the RIN and NOR genes. I don't know much about them,  but if they are anything like the U uniform ripening gene I don't want them. I would rather have the green shoulder gene which improves flavor in tomatoes a ton. My Anasazi line has the green shoulder gene and despite heavy cracking it is currently my favorite because it tastes good and grows well enough for me. I could care less about self life if flavor is sacrificed.

But hybrids with new colors and stripes are always fun. And I like the idea of crossing heirlooms together to get new lines to or to use them to breed new material that both tastes good but also grows well and resists some disease more than heirloom parents. Wild Boar Farms might be a good place to contact. I emailed him awhile back and he was mildly interested in the wild tomato breeding project.

William S.

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #2 on: 2018-11-26, 08:20:42 AM »
This could be pretty cool material to work with if it's got good late blight resistance. Doesn't really give great details about the resistance on those listed varieties.
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Nicollas

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #3 on: 2018-11-26, 11:01:47 AM »
Seems that only cultivars tagged XSL contains RIN or NOR

Nicollas

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #4 on: 2018-11-26, 11:06:41 AM »
About resistances

From https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1583036365152637&id=962524457203834&comment_id=1583583485097925

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Tm2a, Ty1, Sw5, I2, I3, Ve, Cf9, Ve, Ph2, Ph3 and Mi - all for pest resistance so far here. It looks like there is progress in identifying markers associated with flavor - that will be exciting. Our selection for flavor has been strictly phenotypic.

Edit: it seems that this batch of cultivars was made before selection by genetic markers
« Last Edit: 2018-11-26, 12:35:12 PM by Nicollas »

Ilex

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #5 on: 2019-04-22, 04:24:23 PM »
Don't use RIN or NOR, use alc instead. Unless you want those round plastic balls.

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #6 on: 2019-04-23, 02:36:59 PM »
Am I right in thinking that anthocyanin tomatoes can show greatly extended post harvest keeping potential? Iím fairly certain this is a real thing with papers and such out there. For example Iíve grown Blue Beauty, which will keep easily 7-10 days longer than any other good tasting, non commercial type tomato, plus it tastes great, in my top 2-5 favorite tomatoes. So, would breeding for anthocyanin potentially get you better keepers with good flavor, without some of the unpleasant genes commercial tomatoes seem to incorporate?
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #7 on: 2019-04-23, 03:08:49 PM »
Am I right in thinking that anthocyanin tomatoes can show greatly extended post harvest keeping potential? Iím fairly certain this is a real thing with papers and such out there. For example Iíve grown Blue Beauty, which will keep easily 7-10 days longer than any other good tasting, non commercial type tomato, plus it tastes great, in my top 2-5 favorite tomatoes. So, would breeding for anthocyanin potentially get you better keepers with good flavor, without some of the unpleasant genes commercial tomatoes seem to incorporate?

Maybe. It's a logical thought anyway. Blue tomatoes seem to take longer to ripen,  but I'm not sure if that's necessarily a keeping quality or a side effect of basically being a sunscreen and preventing sun ripening.

There is some debate whether anthocyanins are linked to bitter flavor compounds or are slightly bitter themselves,  but with the newer blue tomato hybrids I think it was just a matter of genetic drag and other poor flavor genetics. I personally don't think there is much of correlation,  but perhaps my taste bud genetics are different than others.

I personally want to try combing a blue with green shoulders.  Can't remember if I've seen that already.

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #8 on: 2019-04-23, 03:52:36 PM »
Found this journal article- anthocyanin does extend shelf life.  :)
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205650
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William S.

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Re: Good Tomato material for dehybridization
« Reply #9 on: 2019-04-23, 03:58:37 PM »
If I can keep it straight and remember to collect the seed separate. I wouldn't be surprised if I already have an green shoulder with blue skin in my segregating F2 populations. I think that showed up last year in the Blue Ambrosia x multiple unknown red's F1s
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