Author Topic: Climate Change Breeding  (Read 2382 times)

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 496
  • Karma: 30
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #60 on: 2019-12-31, 02:58:17 AM »
I don't know anything about sun screen, never tried the stuff but I do wear long sleeves and a hat during hot parts of the day. I go the Goodwill store each spring and find 4 or 5 nice heavy all white, all cotton shirts that are at least two sizes too big. They have to be heavy cotton with the double layer across the shoulders, thin material just lets in the heat and traps it but the thick baggy ones keep me comfortable. Also seems to me that the sun is more uncomfortable than it used to be.

I don't know if it is UV or just the heat but when it's over 90 F with intense sun lots of things are effected I think. Sweet potatoes wilt in the afternoons even if they don't need watered. Corn planted Early July tassels same time as the earlier planted patch.

When really weird stuff like going six weeks of 90 F + sun to a month of 60 F + rain and then back to the hot again things sometimes just fail completely. Last year April and May were hot and I had a beautiful patch of squash growing. Then it turned cool and wet with 21 inches of rain and little sun at all from June 1 to June 21. I didn't get a single squash last year. Tomatoes recovered in the hot dry after that and produced wonderfully without another drop of water until August.

Richard Watson

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 314
  • Karma: 21
  • South Island - New Zealand
    • View Profile
    • Sentinels Group Seeds
    • Email
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #61 on: 2019-12-31, 11:04:03 AM »
I don't know anything about sun screen, never tried the stuff but I do wear long sleeves and a hat during hot parts of the day. I go the Goodwill store each spring and find 4 or 5 nice heavy all white, all cotton shirts that are at least two sizes too big. They have to be heavy cotton with the double layer across the shoulders, thin material just lets in the heat and traps it but the thick baggy ones keep me comfortable. Also seems to me that the sun is more uncomfortable than it used to be.

I'm more comfortable just in a light coloured singlets, bit I am fortunate to have some Spanish ancestry which allows me to tan without burning.



On Face Book there was an excellent post by Liz Gladin on the Soil4climate page, thought I would share it here 
Quote
CO2 is a major global climate influencer and the issue is how those increases impact global processes - surface temperature, sea temperature, acidification processes etc, with multiple and synergistic feedbacks. Yes plants need CO2 but the rises in temperature brought about by rising CO2 (and other GHGs) affect processes other than ‘providing more of the CO2 needed to grow’. Temperature is a major impact on plant biochemistry and the speed of change in global temperatures (alongside wider changes in hydrology, soil systems, disease patterns etc etc) prohibit adaptive processes. It’s not simply about the CO2 - this is simply a marker about the impacts of which are too often not explained which opens up the ‘plants need CO2 so it is a good thing’ arguments. It is about the impacts of the rapid increase in CO2 on complex global systems - in the case of plants, on the impact of elevated CO2 and warming on growth responses - predicted shifts in rates of/relationships in photosynthesis, photorespiration, respiration, reproduction, of generally drier environments, and thermally-induced physical and biochemical changes to plant-based ocean systems. And where feedbacks are not fully understood in a world that has 7 billion people which need feeding by those plant systems and which as people here point out are already showing signs of increasing stress, failure even from historical and contemporary human processes. Clocking up the rapid increase in CO2, which we all understand is necessary for life on earth, is simply a marker for the broader complex changes we are facing. Or rather, that we are not facing up to.
« Last Edit: 2019-12-31, 11:05:34 AM by Richard Watson »
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 496
  • Karma: 30
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #62 on: 2019-12-31, 03:08:13 PM »
The extra CO2, 100 PPM over and above any natural amount in the last 800,000 years got the ball rolling but now along with it the feed backs are certainly kicking it. Less white ice and snow reflecting energy back to space being replaced by more dark water absorbing it is a big one. Methane bubbling out of terrestrial and sub sea previously permafrost is another one.

This is just my theory but I think what global warming really is, is ocean warming. The land surface and the air just don't have the physical ability to store heat allowing it to build up but water definitely does, and there is a whole lot of water on earth.

Here in NH and in my garden what it comes down to in the short term is that the Arctic with lessening ice cover is warming faster than at lower latitudes. This is decreasing the temp difference between the pole and the equator which is slowing and distorting the jet stream and it's playing hell with my squash and potatoes, among other things. Not to mention the air full of smoke when California and Canada burn every summer like Australia is now.

Andrew Barney

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 257
  • Karma: 28
  • Northern Colorado, Semi-Arid Climate, USA
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #63 on: 2019-12-31, 10:49:19 PM »
Here in Colorado and at high altitude we probably get higher UV because of the thinner atmosphere. I really think higher UV is one reason sometimes random seeds from the generic big box stores croak immediately when introduced to my area. Among other reasons in combination.

One reason I particularly like crops with high anthocyanins. Basically plant UV filter to some degree. The silver leaves squashes also highly interest me in this regard as well possibly.

reed

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 496
  • Karma: 30
  • Narrow Ridge above the Ohio River zone 6a
    • View Profile
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #64 on: 2020-01-01, 03:52:49 AM »
Yes, UV is stronger at altitude. I don't know all the attributes of anthocyanins but isn't it what causes the purple coloration  in plants? Sweet potatoes with it wilt in the hot sun faster than than green ones. I assumed it was because of the darker color. Again with sweet potatoes they all recover from the wilting immediatly as soon as the sun drops below the trees to the west of the garden, I mean within minutes it seems like. Squash and other things aren't recovered till the next morning.  Corn leaves cure lengthwise on the edges and droop at the tip.

William S.

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 418
  • Karma: 39
    • View Profile
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #65 on: 2020-01-01, 10:00:23 AM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcmahon/2020/12/30/animal-agriculture-costs-more-in-health-damage-than-it-contributes-to-the-economy/amp/

This article reminds me of Gene Logsdon and his philosophy. Gene railed against factory farming of livestock. Insisted that it would be better to have real traditional small holdings. Where a farmer grows crops and livestock together on the same small acreage.

I think this article is kind of mainly suggesting holding the facilities to higher pollution standards.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

PaulJ

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17
  • Karma: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Climate Change Breeding
« Reply #66 on: 2020-01-02, 05:23:58 AM »
during an ice age I get more mild weather, but the big hallmark of ice age weather is randomness in the weather.
so I have been collecting seeds for every climate.
never know what will happen
history shows that the earth is really not stable at all.
what I really need are plants that can take UV light, cosmic rays, and unstable daily weather.

I agree, there does seem to be a large random element.
What do I know, I have some dry hot weather seeds too : )
Im a solar cycle believer not a climate denier, they are not mutually exclusive
« Last Edit: 2020-01-02, 05:30:21 AM by PaulJ »