Author Topic: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere  (Read 226 times)

Andrew Barney

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #15 on: 2022-07-28, 11:58:32 AM »
Welcome to the forum. We can always use more people who actually like to post. :D

I need to be better about taking pictures so that my posts are not just text.

We can always use more people working on the wild tomato projects! Sounds like you have a lot of species you are working with or want to work with.

I recently read about an interesting High-Fat Oat. Something that interests me because I mostly use oat milk now with my cereal. I can no longer have soy and am increasingly becoming allergic to milk products. I guess the history is that way back when the false teachings of the USDA food pyramid were around and the sugar industry lobbyists funded the government they thought high-fat foods made people fat. This is now known to be completely opposite. But i guess around the same time they made a law that said oats could not be sold if they were above a certain fat percentage, so they bred them all to be low fat oats. I read a heirloom group somewhere rediscovered a high-fat oat variety and they said it tastes really good!

Greenie DeS

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #16 on: 2022-07-30, 10:00:53 AM »
Sounds like you're having a lot of fun, it's certainly fun to read about.

I honestly just chop my male squash flowers up and put them in omlettes or scrambled eggs, with or without a little cheese. The traditional stuff, batter, and fry (or just batter and fry) seems to be more work than I ever put in. Running up to pick male flowers for breakfast is a great way to check for female flowers daily either way.

Store garlic is just fine to plant, in my experience. No harm in planting some, then in adding more if you find something interesting - doesn't sound like you'll run out of space.

I always enjoy hearing people integrating their livestock into growing systems. Looking forward to seeing more of what you do there -- you feed them to your sheep as well as the chickens?

Greenie DeS

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #17 on: 2022-07-30, 10:01:42 AM »
I recently read about an interesting High-Fat Oat. Something that interests me because I mostly use oat milk now with my cereal. I can no longer have soy and am increasingly becoming allergic to milk products. I guess the history is that way back when the false teachings of the USDA food pyramid were around and the sugar industry lobbyists funded the government they thought high-fat foods made people fat. This is now known to be completely opposite. But i guess around the same time they made a law that said oats could not be sold if they were above a certain fat percentage, so they bred them all to be low fat oats. I read a heirloom group somewhere rediscovered a high-fat oat variety and they said it tastes really good!

I'd love to hear more about this.

Kadence Luneman

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #18 on: 2022-08-03, 11:34:53 AM »
I don't have a place to move the squash plants to so I fed them to the chickens who had fun tearing them apart. Now I'm working on pulling the weeds. Then I can move the chickens off and till it and shape the beds. See what I can get in for fall. If nothing else I'll be planting the winter wheat and winter rye. Some of the rye will stay to harvest next year and most will be as cover crop.

Dad knows a guy with some equipment something that's going to take the manure/hay bedding from the sheep's winter pen and dump it on the garden for me. I'm hoping he can pull out the huge rock. I measured the whole garden and didn't include the huge rock. Thinking I'll turn that odd end into the permanent herbs/flowers probably.
I've drawn up the garden and the plan for bed layout. I'm going with market garden style with 30" beds and 12" paths. This gives me 7 beds 100ft long, 5 beds 54ft long, 1 bed 40ft, 1 bed 20ft. For a grand total of 1,030 row ft. Plus the weird area around the big rock that will probably become permanent herbs/flowers.
« Last Edit: 2022-08-03, 11:39:41 AM by Kadence Luneman »

Kadence Luneman

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #19 on: 2022-08-03, 11:49:52 AM »
I figured out pictures! Haha. Ok so the pics in my last post are the dimensions of the garden area, excluding the big rock which is at the narrow left end. The second picture is my estimation of the way beds will be made. 30" beds and 12" paths. The vertical lines are imagined divisions along the beds into 20ft sections because most things seem to fit in that well for the amount I plan to grow next year. I don't plan to cut the beds into short lengths like that it just helps me invision how it will look and space for different plantings.
I've filled it in now with my rough draft of where things will go.

Tim DH

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #20 on: 2022-08-03, 01:59:18 PM »
Hi Kadence,
   My beds are 65” wide at home… If I was starting again I’d probably go for 50” and an 18” path.
   50” would be wide enough to put up the A frame of a climbing bean support. Paths any narrower than 18”, when you kneel down to attend to something on one side, your boots are trashing something on the other side!

Tim DH

Steph S

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Re: Shenanigans at Homestead Nowhere
« Reply #21 on: 2022-08-03, 02:22:04 PM »
Good point about the paths!  (and many things my feet have trashed).   I can handle 48 inch beds and just reach everything by working both sides.  I have a couple of beds that are 4 1/2 and 5 ft wide and it's really hard to reach that middle.   30 inch is pretty sweet but depends on what you're planting, do you lose space because you run out of width.  If I was buying lumber for raised beds instead of using every old scrap I can find,  they would all be 4X8, and very easy to replace parts as they age, instead of random lengths and widths.

Big rock:  I've learned that rock workarounds make for interesting microclimates.  As long as you're not planting on top of rock, an immovable stone does modify the environment in helpful ways.  You might get some out of zone herbs to thrive around it that would be challenged out in the open.