Author Topic: Kanti Rawal and Steve Peters Tomato Breeding  (Read 133 times)

William S.

  • Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,631
  • Karma: 66
    • Botanist, gardener, and science teacher.
    • View Profile
  • Koppen zone: Dfb Googled
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6A
Kanti Rawal and Steve Peters Tomato Breeding
« on: 2022-05-18, 02:30:57 PM »
I think I met Steve Peters about 5 or 6 years ago. He came up with OSA for a free workshop as part of some extended OSA support for the local seed movement here in Western Montana.

I've been following Fred Hempel Artisan Seeds on Instagram. Recently he posted the following. "We are devoting a corner of our field to the work of Kanti Rawal and Steve Peters (Seed rEvolution Now) this year. They are developing new low input, hardy tomato varieties that don't require staking."


https://seedrevolutionnow.blogspot.com/

https://tmcdermott.com/food/a-tomato-dream/

One variety associated with seems to be Brandywine Cherry a cherry tomato with Brandywine ancestry. Another is Brandywine saladette.

They are dry farming them in California and they don't require staking. They are supposed to be modern determinates crossed with heirlooms.

I wondered if they might be dwarfs but uncertain if that is actually the case- there are tomatoes other than dwarfs that do a decent job of keeping the tomatoes off the ground. In fact Joseph Lofthouse wrote about that with some of his older strains.

Anyway, I think it is fun that there are groups of tomato breeders out there that I haven't heard much of before but who are doing very interesting work! 

Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Greenie DeS

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 132
  • Karma: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Kanti Rawal and Steve Peters Tomato Breeding
« Reply #1 on: 2022-05-20, 08:20:23 PM »
That's super neat. I was going to say there does seem to be a convergence on breeding tomatoes for actual functionality/convenience, but I guess we also have a lot of pretty coming down the pipes these days too. I love that so many people are doing this. I also wonder what they mean by "hardy"- hardy to what factors.