Author Topic: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes  (Read 2530 times)

William Schlegel

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #30 on: 2022-07-15, 10:52:19 PM »
May have a tomato containing 1/4 LA2329 genetics getting larger it is (MMS x BH F2) x (promiscuous x LA2329 F1). Photo attached- the transplanted anther cone is still attached.

Have attempted promiscuous x LA2329, BH x LA2329, (MMS x BH F2) x (LA1410 x unknown), and MMM x LA1410 crosses in the Arthropod resistance garden. So all the different plants in there this year have had at least a attempt made at a deliberate cross. Also the MMM aka (MMS x BH) F2 potato leaf crosses are showing on average more exsertion as it gets hotter. I am also increasingly confident that 2021 gave us F1s with both LA2329 and LA1410 the habrochaites and galapagense arthropod resistance sources. Small tomatoes have formed already on the galapagenose hybrid and I see a small possibility of stripes and fuzz. I can't wait to grow the F2s and so forth!
« Last Edit: 2022-07-15, 10:55:04 PM by William Schlegel »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William Schlegel

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #31 on: 2022-07-22, 12:44:56 PM »
Made more MMM F2 x (promiscuous x LA2329) attempts with a nice blue skinned and modestly exserted MMM F2 today.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William Schlegel

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  • Koppen zone: Dfb Googled
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6A
Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #32 on: 2022-08-12, 11:49:54 PM »
Some of my very exciting crosses are now buried under F1 Promiscuous x LA2329 habrochaites foliage. I hope they ripen soon, and I am able to dig them out of there with the labels intact! On the plus side I see quite a bit of fruit setting on both the F1 and the pure LA2329 plants. The possibility that some of those may also be back crosses is also intriguing. This project would be greatly simplified if a high percentage LA2329 habrochaites plant would produce good tasting tomatoes. Though the possibilities in both directions are really rich right now with 50% habrochaites, 62.5% habrochaites, 31.25% habrochaites, and 81.25% habrochaites/wild all reasonably possible outcomes of this year's crossing block with LA2329, MMM F1, Promiscuous, Big Hill, and the Promiscuous x LA2329 F1's. I am simplifying a little bit because there is likely a little bit of penellii in there as well and some of the domestics come with some introgressions from additional species. Also, I have the LA1410 Solanum galapagense in the same garden. If I get a LA1410 cross a subsequent year goal will be something like (MMM x LA2329) x (MMM x LA1410).
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days