Author Topic: Hulless pumpkin  (Read 319 times)

Dominic J

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Hulless pumpkin
« on: 2022-04-05, 05:49:24 PM »
Doesn't seem to be a whole lot of people interested in pumpkin?

I haven't grown pumpkins a lot, not a big fun of pumpkin pie/muffings, but once I tasted 'Kakai' seeds, I was blown away. We'd roast pumpkin seeds pretty much every year, but I always found them pretty unpleasant and bland. But these hulless pumpkins... were something else. Started harvesting seeds last year from my patch that had 'Kakai', 'Lady Gedova', and a few others. The seed yield feels pretty poor, though. Lots of growing space used up for a handful of seeds.

I figure I could try to breed in PM resistance into these, along with better flesh flavor (though honestly, Kakai's flesh didn't seem all that bad to me), but mostly, I'd like to work on these seed yields. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas to help improve that.

Stuart (1983) claims that a single recessive gene conditions the existence of a thin, parchment like seedcoat. So that trait is pretty easy to work with.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Hulless pumpkin
« Reply #1 on: 2022-04-05, 07:49:24 PM »
Zeedman on Homegrown Goodness did a 2010 trial of several naked-seeded varieties.  He called the o.p. seeds he collected "Little Greenseed".

I think that was also called the Long Island Seed Project.

There is a lot of information on the site - quotes from articles that I could copy here.

For instance:    Inheritance of Seedcoat Development and Color

Several inheritance studies conducted in the early 1950s (Heinisch and Ruthenberg 1950; Mudra and Neuman 1952; Schoeniger 1950, 1952, 1955; Weiling and von Becherer 1950) produced conflicting interpretations as to the mode of inheritance of the hull-less condition. More recent work by Stuart (1983) showed convincingly that a single recessive gene conditions the existence of a thin, parchment like seedcoat. At least two additional modifying genes, one of which appears to be dominant (J.B. Loy unpubl.), further reduce the degree of seedcoat development. In seed classified as completely hull-less, the outer seedcoat layers are reduced to the extent that seed take on the appearance of the inner seedcoat layer (chlorenchyma) which is normally dark green (Fig. 1, 2). I have found two color variants of chlorenchyma issue, light green, recessive to dark green, and yellow, recessive to both dark green and light green. When the outer seedcoat is partially developed (monorecessive condition) seedcoats appear grey against a green chlorenchyma background and tan against a yellow chlorenchyma background.

from  Loy, J.B. 1990. Hull-less seeded pumpkins: a new edible snackseed crop. p. 403-407. In: J. Janick and J.E. Simon (eds.), Advances in new crops. Timber Press, Portland, OR.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

spacecase0

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Re: Hulless pumpkin
« Reply #2 on: 2022-04-18, 10:27:17 PM »
I gave up on them because many of the seeds sprouted inside the squash before I harvested them.
so clearly I needed to harvest them earlier,
not sure how to deal with that timing issue,
but I guess I should try again. (when the water returns to my area)

whwoz

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Re: Hulless pumpkin
« Reply #3 on: 2022-04-19, 04:22:25 AM »
From what I can recall from when I grew them, it was harvest as leaves died off and store for about a month before collecting seed, never had any problems with germination in fruit myself so cannot offer further suggestions.

Dominic J

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Re: Hulless pumpkin
« Reply #4 on: 2022-04-19, 11:02:37 AM »
I picked mine when ripe, waited maybe a week or two before de-seeding it, did not have any such issues. Did fail to dry it properly though and had them mold in their bag, but with a bleach treatment I was able to salvage most of them.

Olaf Nurlif

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Re: Hulless pumpkin
« Reply #5 on: 2022-06-15, 04:26:55 PM »
There's a medium sized private owned breeding company here in Austria that works on hullless pumpkins.
They offer some well maintained open pollinated varieties and several hybrid cultivars for both the more humid and arid pumpkin growing regions in Austria.

I could probably get seeds if anyone would be interested in that.