Author Topic: Garden Journal  (Read 2353 times)

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #60 on: 2022-07-05, 09:37:00 AM »
Ugh, goutweed is my nemesis. I probably spent a solid fifth of my landscaping career picking it out of gardens.

I am very happy with my lower-yield, zero-work method of doing potatoes in deep deep straw. I just need to get on buying straw in late summer/early fall in big square bales when it's cheap and available. Which... is coming up.

It's the height of the rhubarb harvest right now, I've started one mead and thinking about starting a second. Sweet ciciley flowers are probably a few days away from candying time (they're black licorice flavoured, if they get simmered in sugar syrup and then dehydrated they are really lovely).

I got some orach seed from a neighbour, she says they self-seed well here. I always thought they were a hot weather plant but I'll give them a try.

Last night I had time to walk the garden just for pleasure. That was very nice.


Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #61 on: 2022-07-07, 06:31:29 AM »
Yeah I have to say, I've really been enjoying the daily data rounds on the heading wheat... just like a stroll for the pleasure, except for the excitement of being on a mission.
I finally got that pea trellis up yesterday.  I also did a little sympathy watering in the perennial garden, which is strictly rain fed.  The drought effects are a bit more severe than I've seen before.  Rain finally came overnight and it is pelting down there now this morning.  Just a huge relief for all things getting crispy...   Dragonflies and damselflies were lurking in the valley yesterday in anticipation.  First big blue of the season.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #62 on: 2022-07-10, 01:48:47 PM »
Got my Sorghum weeded and another patch of tomatoes.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #63 on: 2022-07-11, 12:32:49 PM »
Last night was another late-night garden walk. In a month it'll be dark enough I'll need a headlamp for these.

Corn is very happy for the most part and it's just such a generous plant to work with. I suspect I'll feel differently when much of it doesn't ripen, but I get so much enjoyment out of watching it put on significant daily growth. The tomatoes are similar, but I'm more used to them growing like that. Tomato flowers are starting to come out in very unexpected shapes on unexpected plants.

I planted some fall seeds: diakon, a little napa cabbage, a little of a heading cabbage that's supposed to resist aphids, a bunch more greens mixes of various brassicas, or lettuces, and chicories. I've tossed diakon seeds in the greens mixes, a riff on planting radishes in to mark the row, just for fun.

My maximas are just barely starting to vine, the direct-seeded ones on the southmost slope do in fact seem to be catching up with my indoor starts. Folks always say that happens but I admit to surprise.

Now I'm turning my mind to my fall-planted grains, favas, etc with some encouragement from Steph's posts.

My lamb's quarters isn't going to seed yet, but the weeds in with it that I'd rather not keep are. I may actually do some hand weeding that isn't directly from the ground to my mouth or my salad bowl.

I need to find room for my skirret and alba roses in the ground so they can settle in before winter.

Aside from a bit of leaf damage on my turnips and arugula things look good.

After a ton of ducklings hatched this spring I'm giving some thought to what running ducks under a half-grown stand of corn would look like. I bet they'd be happy.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #64 on: 2022-07-12, 09:55:16 PM »
Haven't been watering the garden as much as I should have been.

But, I did learn that the Bhutan-meets-Greg Cucumber Grex, is very drought tolerant. Other cucumbers are smaller, some yellow leaves etc.

Growing around 7 varieties, Poona Kheera and Sikkim are in this mix as well. But, this grex is doing great, have it in some different spots too. Cucumbers are full of water, so I am starting to water these more often as they need it. West India Gherkins, and Mexican Sour Gherkins don't need much water either. The Sour Gherkins do get very sour if I don't water them, so there is that to consider.


Tomatoes aren't doing the greatest, our cool weather flipped from the 60s to the 80s - 90s pretty early in the season and there hasn't been much rain in those periods. Mine are starting to recover, other people's are as well.

Exserted Orange is flowering a lot now. Lot of the things I wanted to use it to cross with didn't do well, some died. Noticed some S. habrochaites volunteers, they are actually outcompeting grass... Guess something that competes with grass and weeds makes decent breeding material. Some pimpinellifolium types are growing in lightly shaded areas around the border of the house.


Elderberry I found last year still has yellow berries: https://youtu.be/iFxaJOjuMCw

Guess I need to take cuttings. Also taking cuttings of some brambles. Got a bunch of strawberry varieties and species in one pot, trying to use as little pots to save moving room as possible.

Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #65 on: 2022-07-14, 09:17:07 AM »
Yesterday when I went to check the grains in the back beds, I startled the small rabbit inside the enclosure.   Trying to shoo the thing out, apparently they cannot see chicken wire as this little hare bounced itself repeatedly off two sides that are wired in before it finally got a clear shot at a way out.   These back beds were never really secure, there's row cover around the back and it keeps fallling off and getting propped up again.  I decided to put an extra piece of chicken wire around the peas and barley, which I meant to do just for support, again done hastily and a bit of a mess but it was enough to keep them out last night.
I also planted some kousa in the unfinished salad bar out front, and secured the sides. 
This morning out watering I found the rabbit had gotten into the small W bed of Black Hulled Emmer and Rivet, which just emerged from boot, and ate the whole back corner.
Again I had left the back open because there are big tall plants now behind it.
There hasn't been a bad rabbit year here for a long while.  Bit of row cover draped around beds has been enough to keep animals away.  With regards the snowshoe hares, they find lots of grass around the garden, which they seem to like best to eat anyway, so why worry about something surrounded by cover that might be a trap.
Problem is, it's so hot and dry, you can't help noticing the difference where watering has been done.
I've been watching that little rabbit from the window, sneaking in beside the garlic bed to nibble that bit of grass near the edge of it where water fell from the hose.
Anyway, the other problem is, grain is a grass.  It's what they like best.
So I will have to improve on my fencing of the trial areas.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #66 on: 2022-07-16, 02:15:00 PM »
Weeded with the red rototiller this morning. It doesn't do a great job but it covers a lot of territory fast.

Got my pepo squash grex weeded. It seems to be suffering from some kind of deficiency in part.

I am behind on weeding and watering several areas still. Making some progress weekend by weekend.

Very warm today currently 94 F or 34.4 C it looks like similar temperatures may persist the remainder of the month.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Randy Simmons

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #67 on: 2022-07-24, 01:09:44 PM »
Temps have been in the upper 80's-mid 90's here with very little precipitation. 

Tomatoes are healthy except for Terra Cotta.  Exserted Orange has one tomato and some flowers, Exserted Tiger has ten tomatoes and flowers.  MMS X BH has six tomatoes that are starting to ripen.  Three are cherry type, two are grape type, and beefsteak shaped.

Peppers are moving slowly.

Cajun Jewel is producing pods.  Out of new varieties Zambia Landrace II, Cowhorn, and Go Big are only ones doing anything.  Zambian is largest okra plant in my garden.

Out of squash planted Bulam is biggest, followed by Lofthouse, and then Canadian Crookneck.  The rest are smallprobably won't produce anything.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #68 on: 2022-07-24, 03:10:41 PM »
I think I am back down to two Okra plants. I think I should have started them in pots. They are tiny.

Randy that is pretty exciting to me to hear about the three tomatoes from my garden.

My main moschata and pepo grexes are small. Maximas seem ok but not great. The goldini zucchini patch seems good.

The watermelon plants might be a bit on the small side.

Corn is starting to tassle.

I still haven't completed a complete first weed through of the gardens but made some more progress. It's possible that some of the rows of flint corn are just doomed.

« Last Edit: 2022-07-24, 03:12:16 PM by William Schlegel »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #69 on: 2022-07-25, 12:18:27 PM »
Doing my first pass of watering for the year before the heat we're supposed to have this week (32C daytime, 14C nighttime, which is surprising for us). I need some sort of a pressure booster for my hoses, the pressure tank for my well is too erratic to do irrigation usefully, but here we are.

My squash are sending up male flowers only so far, but a couple melons are somehow a little ahead of the squashes.

I've been doing a bit of weeding, the pennycress is almost seeding so I'm trying to get it to the pigs before the seed drops.

Daikon is up and on its first set of (slightly flea-beetled) leaves, along with more lettuces etc. Turnips are lovely. Still in love with b carinata, which has leaves thick enough that the flea beetles don't really impact it substantially-- the leaves get pocked but not holes nor broken down into lace.

The Crowpocalypse on my corn beds meant I'd underseeded a bunch of my corn with greens, including lettuces, and then replanted the beds when the corn was killed. There was enough soil disturbance to make the underplanting very patchy, and I'd taken those markers down in the garden. Now I have a very splashy, breathtakingly lovely collection of mostly-romaine-looking lettuces that I cannot trace back to their origin, but I very much want to keep growing in the future. Letting some go to seed was always the plan, so this doesn't really change much. They really are gorgeous though.

My dry beans are very slow, blossoms on some of them just coming out and others probably will wait till later this week. Also my favas don't seem to be setting seed right? They bloom and then shrivel.

I'm collecting seed from my first capsicum pubescens crosses, which is fun. I'm not yet used to opening them up and seeing black seeds. The plants seem to be unhappy on my deck, they're pretty yellow, I think it may be sun bleaching.

Most of my energy is going into a new permaculture food forest-style perennial planting down by the house: apples, ribes, old roses, haskaps, sour cherries, grapes, comfrey, rhubarb, sweet ciciley, asparagus, mint, horseradish, skirret, that sort of thing all with some serious microclimating plans. I know I'll later regret putting it in without eradicating the aspen completely first, but I want to put in the screen for my neighbours asap.

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #70 on: 2022-07-30, 09:50:33 AM »
Everything has loved this heat. Corn has roughly doubled in biomass volume in the last week, squash has tripled, tomato patch is as expected a solid mat by now -- best for cross-pollination, I think. My speckled tomato plant still has speckled tomatoes.

I have been watering with the one sprinkler that takes my well's pressure -- set it in place, timer for an hour, move it over one increment, timer for an hour, repeat. I'm aiming to hit every spot once a week which seems to work. They're calling for rain by midweek so I can relax after that.

Work has been a lot of kms on my legs with a heavy pack of water in the heat so I haven't been doing much in the evenings. This weekend I'm going to play with a bunch more crosses -- maybe I'll make a cup of tea and do that right now, actually.

Once I start getting ripe fruit I think I'm going to take cuttings from my favourite of the promiscuous plants to bring in and play with during the winter. Why not? Hydroponics really makes that easy.

My peppers are mostly in small holding pots, but I do keep intending to pot them up. It really am enjoying their diversity.

Meanwhile I'm laying out more perennial beds and mucking the duck and goose barns out onto cardboard where I want those beds next year, lasagne-style. A fall and winter should give them enough time for the grass to break down and the bedding to compost enough.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #71 on: 2022-07-30, 03:34:11 PM »
My watering strategy is to try to hit everything I can for six to 12 hours on the weekend with a sprinkler or soaker hose. I don't always get everything watered.

Bought more soaker hose (300 feet) to replace some that got old and tore. Hard to do anything but water and pick a few tomatoes and other seeds.
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Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #72 on: 2022-07-31, 07:03:23 AM »
I started to pull the garlic on Friday, which was three weeks from scapes being cut and usually spot on for the time they're ready.   I think it was about right for the glazers, which are smaller anyway as they're still growing up from bulbils, and in a couple of cases starting to split those inside wrappers.   I started on the main crop of Marbled Purple Stripes but after pulling the first variety I stopped.   The bulbs are crazy small!   It is not just the effects of a winter without snow cover, although I can see that didn't help.  But it seems to me these bulbs can't have grown at all during the hottest weather and high UV.   They all look pretty 'stricken' with browning of all tips and half leaves, but under the ground they're not done. The ground is plenty moist down at the bulb level so it's not moisture deficit.    Leaving the rest for another full week if it doesn't rain heavily.
Meanwhile the Prelude wheat is getting close to harvest time.  I read that they should be harvested before full maturity due to shattering.  So I plan to cut and hang them indoors to finish maturing.  Some of the Emmers from the Blue Tinge group are also very close.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #73 on: 2022-07-31, 09:41:24 PM »
Goldini is doing good. I found a suspected teosinte.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days