Author Topic: Garden Journal  (Read 2354 times)

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #30 on: 2022-05-13, 12:16:00 AM »
Haskap buds are well and truly burst on my southernmost slope and flowers will be opening soon. The hummingbirds are out to take a look. Stinging nettles are big enough to pick. My thistle patch is coming up, looks like it spread a bunch, I'd better get on that. Last year I was going to eat the young shoots and missed the very short window.

Thinking about the garden down south. Without my dogs down there I wonder what deer are least likely to eat?

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #31 on: 2022-05-15, 08:00:17 PM »
Moved a columbine and a bleeding heart to the flower / pollinator area.

Also dug up some milkweed rhizomes and used a bit of rooting hormone on them. Dug up and moved my butterfly bush that I bought last year on sale.


Stonecrop, Coneflower, Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), Morning glories, Ipomoea quamoclit, Scarlet Runner beans, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Peppers, Ground cherries, Solanum habrochaites, Solanum peruvianum, Tzimbalo Melon Pear, Solanum caripense (True Species), Red Beebalm, Mentha species, Chives, Kangaroo Apples, Litchi tomatoes, Nasturtiums, Canary Nasturtium, Lavender, Anise Hyssops Catnip, Grape hyacinth.


All of these fellows will be in the same general area this year.

Typically, Bombus species only go for certain flowers / species listed here - Kangaroo Apple and Litchi tomato's large flowers, large morning glories, Coneflower, Scarlet Runner bean flowers, Red Beebalm, Catnip and mints along with Anise Hyssops etc.

Honey bees usually swarm Milkweed, Chives flowers, bunch of the same things that Bombus species do. Typically don't go near anything that require them to shake flowers to release pollen or other things.

Probably don't need to mention how happy Butterflies will be to have all of these species in the same area - especially the butterfly bush and Milkweed. Hoping to see hummingbirds stop by as well.


Usually takes a year for pollinators to realize that a new flower / species exists. Happened with S. habrochaites and other species. Kangaroo Apples and Litchi tomatoes were only noticed by one bee last year - more should visit this time around.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #32 on: 2022-05-15, 09:06:13 PM »
I've been seeing Bombus queens out and about on what flowers are around this early.

I've been seeing a lot of Colorado Potato Beetle but the annual Solanum species that they usually utilize isn't germinating yet. Phenology seems slow here.

I rototilled for a few hours this morning. Then this afternoon I got some Cucurbita maxima planted in two spots I had rototilled earlier. I planted the grex this year for the first time since 2019 as I am not growing a seed crop of Lofthouse Buttercup this year. So some Tetsukabuto genetics, some Lofthouse maxima genetics, some random saved seeds including some from as far back as 2016 and two packets my wife wanted to grow for ornamental purposes Jarrahdale and a pink or white hybrid.

I weeded the volunteer Lofthouse parsnip patch for awhile and also played whack a Cardaria draba, as well as perennial grasses, and Cirsium arvense out in various gardens with my hoe as the rototiller often seems to skip over them without really rooting them out. I would probably need to make more passes at a time for that. I did that kind of today with one of the areas where I planted the Maxima squash. Whack a Cardaria draba with the hoe seems to be an effective method as well.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #33 on: 2022-05-16, 02:21:09 PM »
Saw my first bumblebee today as well!  ;D

Andrew Barney

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #34 on: 2022-05-16, 02:30:14 PM »
Saw my first bumblebee yesterday! It was flying around the Rubus deliciosus flowers, though I didn't see it land.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #35 on: 2022-05-17, 08:34:16 PM »
Weeded the northeast garden today. Found 7 tomato seedlings in the direct seeded patch there but pulled up one.

Planted sweet corn and watermelons with my son.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #36 on: 2022-05-19, 03:59:17 PM »
Planted flint corn and Goldini squash today in the northeast garden. Left the tomatoes out on the land covered all day. Uncovered the tomato bed at the house. Wish the temperature would warm up to 40 degrees F at night.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #37 on: 2022-05-23, 04:45:48 PM »
Cucumbers, Indian gherkins, Mexican gherkins, beans, morning glories and nasturtiums are coming up nicely.

Took them a little while to start coming up, I have Joseph's landrace, Bhutan-meets-Greg (A landrace with Gagon cucumber mixed into it), Dragon's Egg, Richmond Apple, Poona Kheera, Sikkim, SMR 58, County Fair, Lemon cucumber, Beit Alpha, Jibai Shimoshirazu.

The Experimental Farm Network West Indian gherkin seems ro look different than the standard variety, I am growing the normal type alongside it.

The beans and morning glories are mostly for seed - flowers this year. The only thing that I'm really growing for food on the trellis is probably the cucumbers. I will probably end up with a lot of seed by the end of this all.

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #38 on: 2022-05-23, 06:13:05 PM »
No tillers for a week, I presoaked my fava beans and couldn't wait, so I hand-dug the new ground (well, pig-depastured ground) and put them in yesterday. Will be doing the same with snap and soup peas this evening.

Got a bit of a sunburn so spent some time indoors picking through a bag of painted mountain corn. Apparently I pulled out my favourite 80 kernels and might try to cross it with morden. Lots of spots (cudu?), stripes, an eagle, some lavender, coffee, and both lavender and orange flame ones. Nothing green in the bag, it looks like. I need to track down a reference for how these colours move, though I expect crossing them with the white morden is the best way to see what happens.

Squash massive grex started indoors yesterday, melon big grex started today. I should start my squash pollen-trap gold nuggets too. If I get a bag of viable seeds out of any of it I'll call these a win.

Haskaps are blooming and the hummingbirds are becoming a hazard. They fly in through the door to the deck and get stuck in my vaulted roof. Will keep the door closed for a bit. It's the first mosquito hatch, so fair enough.

Cucumbers are working on their first leaf. I think I'm going to try the tromboncino and young north georgia candy roaster this year instead of zucchini, to give me a good clean pepo grex.

My rapini keeps coming up in the greenhouse and the ducks keep eating it - it self-seeded last year. I'm sad about that. Maybe I should try and salvage a piece.

I have roughly a billion matchbox pepper pods to pick and put into rice vinegar. It's my current favourite condiment. I better not fall in love with all the peppers I'm trialling this year; I do not have room for them all in the house over winter.

My heavily-selected pepperoncini seeds (only one plant of all of them actually set fruit last year) are flowering very precociously. Very pleased with that.

I'm making up a planting calendar for next year, with all the weird one-off things I forget to plant until a couple weeks later than I should (lentils are on my mind right now)

My corn isolation spot is super shot through with aspen roots that are much wider than I thought. My options are to give up without ripping them all out and water and fertilize very heavily, or to take a lot more time prepping that spot.

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #39 on: 2022-05-23, 06:16:19 PM »
Oh, and the upper field is silty sand, I guess it is an old riding ring (with years of pasture, then pigs). Bunch of very rounded rocks in there too. If there wasn't so much organic matter in the soil it would feel like a beach. I suspect I'll have to water it.

Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #40 on: 2022-05-24, 05:13:07 PM »
I planted some white spruces today along my west property line, which I had to hook out of the old garden area.  These are nice trees, and since the var takes over any cut or falling down areas to their exclusion, I wanted to make sure we have some young ones still coming along in the forested part.   I also managed to plant some shrubs this week  that have been languishing in pots for longer than I care to remind myself.  Hawthorns, a white lilac, forsythia.   I have more trees in pots that I would really like to plant now but I think for most it will be impossible to do them justice without a lot of prep.  At minimum there are days of work cutting out deadwood and cleaning up what has fallen, technically I could do that this time of year without bothering the birds but I haven't bit the bullet to buy myself a cordless chainsaw and it really is too much to do without a hand.
All the tall soup peas are in, I've run out of space for them here, so I put some lines of sprouted peas into a flat until I can get out and build the trellis at my mother's.  Amplissimo Victoria Ukrainskaya, Biskopens, Bulroyd Bean, Latvian Soup Pea is a new one from Salt Spring.  In the short soup peas, I have interplanted rows of Margaret McKee with a Black Hulless Barley that is supposed to be short and robust (no lodging), with a long row of McKee in front, to see if they produce as well in between as they do alone.  Desiree Blue Pod is another long row on the back.   Not sure what kind of supports these will get.  The barley is already up, planted a week earlier, but it's all under row cover yet, as are my other grains (except the fall planted spelt) until I get some protection around the beds.   A lot of rabbits this year.  And indeed the spelt has been browsed, maybe multiple times, and could do with some protection itself.
I also soaked the favas, and put them in pots to start on the advice of a friend who says critters took all they direct seeded one year.  So we'll let them sprout up first I guess.


William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #41 on: 2022-05-27, 06:26:16 PM »
Pepo and some moschata squashes are germinating. No maxima germInation yet. Some volunteer corn is up but none of what I deliberately planted. Sunflowers are up.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #42 on: 2022-05-28, 05:27:16 AM »
Moved some more volunteers into the flower garden: Tragopogon porrifolius, Ageratina altissima, Siberian wallflower - Ageratina altissima and Siberian wallflower just started popping up this year / last year. Turns out that both are perennial - I dug up two Ageratina plants and moved them next to the Milkweed, Pokeweed and Butterfly Bush.

Butterflies seemed to enjoy Ageratina last year, bees visited it as well - grows tall enough to warrant putting into a flower garden as well. It also still flowers late into the season. Should start flowering in late summer, the plants last year were new arrivals as mentioned before, interested to see how many flowers they put out this year as they are pretty tall and bushy at the moment.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #43 on: 2022-05-28, 07:50:50 PM »
Planted bush beans and tepary beans, planted some onion including Dakota tears and third generation in my garden Lofthouse, and second generation in my garden leek seed, planted carrots, dill, and parsnips. Planted okra for the first time ever a mix of Mike's grex that I have been intending to plant for years and some Clemson spineless I found in a to give away box of packed for 2021 seed. My wife has been eating a lot of Okra it works with Keto. Planted some radish seed I saved last year. Planted watermelon went heavy on yellow types I got in trade and some saved seed.

My flour corn is germinating. This year it is the Montana Morado Maize though I noticed a few volunteers over where last year's flour corn was in the same garden and I planted cucumbers this year and I think I will leave them. That was Montana Cudu Corn.

Moschata and pepo squash are continuing to germinate. I noticed today a phenomenon whereby some moschata squash seed far from the soaker hose seemed to be germinating great so I moved the soaker hose away from the seed. In moving the hose I  noticed one germinate of the Green Ayote squash from the original packet. I hope more germinate and some of the 2021 green ayote or the the likely hybrid.

I may have found one volunteer watermelon yesterday in the direct seeded tomato row. I left it. I also did some wheel hoeing today in lieu of getting the rototiller back out for fear it would frighten off my son and I hoed around a radish seedling.

Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #44 on: 2022-05-29, 10:55:12 AM »
I re-rototilled a couple areas and planted cowpeas a mix of Joseph's  and Carol's. Planted salsify. Planted sweet sorghum mostly Mennonite with a little bit of a strain from the former USSR, turnips including seven top, purple top white globe, and aprevecho hardy. Also planted tartarian buckwheat. A tiny bit from saved seed and a large packet of Medawaska that has been waiting awhile to get planted.

Edit: also planted scarlet runner and some pole beans.

There is space for another row. Not sure what else to plant.

« Last Edit: 2022-05-29, 08:25:33 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days