Author Topic: Garden Journal  (Read 2352 times)

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #15 on: 2022-04-21, 04:20:14 PM »
Moved some rare "invasive" perennial / annual flowers into a barrel planter along with some other things.

Tiger lilies, tulips, grape hyacinth, variegated stonecrop, sea holly, coneflower, spring garlic.

https://youtube.com/shorts/VJMq7bLCDcs

Some of these aren't very visible yet, others are a little munched by deer. Not sure what some of these plants are, don't seem them elsewhere so figured I would move them to a safe spot.


In a metal planting bin, I moved some apple mint, peppermint (multiple varieties), spearmint and another type of mint. The unknown type, I have always called spearmint - it is different from actual spearmint, this species has more of a "bite" mintiness and some coarse hairs on it (not like apple mint's hairs). I also see a bunch of seedlings, so there is probably going to be a lot of spearmint popping up, the apple mint didn't flower last year.

Also moved some salad burnet, garden sage, oregano and lemon balm in there as well.

The mint more or less just creeps, easy enough to trim if it tries growing upwards.

Oregano, I am not concerned about - I don't use it very much. Lemon balm tends to get bushy. Salad burnet sort of spreads from it's roots like mint does, leaves are also smaller so it will probably grow in-between the mint's gaps.

Pretty much only tossed things in there that are perennials - that would work well enough with each other.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #16 on: 2022-04-23, 10:48:49 PM »
Got some rototilling done today. Red rototiller is working.
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Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #17 on: 2022-04-24, 05:54:23 AM »
I've been doing a lot of work with pick and shovel this past week whenever weather permitted.   Some bed prep for grains, after I discovered large roots had spread into those beds, and some work to open up old garden beds and new space in my old garden area.   All of the beds currently in rotation from last year's garlic have been planted with grain, leaving some space for peas to go in a little later.    There is another small raised bed which was in grain last year and completely fell apart during the winter while the pea trellis was trying to walk away in a gale.   I'm planning to take it apart and rebuild a new bed with space for peas next to/attached to the tomato 'bus shelter', which is the only thing that didn't blow over or away last year.
We got about 5 cm of snow overnight which has turned to rain - enough to melt the snow is expected and to really soak what I planted.  There is some tattered row cover on the newly planted stuff.  Absolutely necessary or the seed would be dug up by birds and/or squirrels, and the young seedlings would be mowed down by hares.  Will have to keep that on until the grass is green ie something else for critters to eat.

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #18 on: 2022-04-24, 12:01:41 PM »
Ugh, Steph, I have aspen roots all through my grain beds. Luckily I gave up on them, planted some haskaps there, and am moving away to somewhere aspen don't even grow.

Avian flu is sweeping through, so my birds are going to be in my greenhouses and confined to my easily-fenced garden beds through mid-May - if the plentiful rapini seed I winter-sowed is up yet (I expect it would be, in the greenhouse) it's long since eaten.. The piglets obligingly escaped and tilled in my kale and lettuce seed for me.

I'm mostly focusing on putting together seed mixes for the new place (1 acre + 1/2 acre + 7000 square feet, all but the latter pretty much raw ground newly reclaimed from rubus spectabilis so it'll need some vigorous growers) and playing with corns and two squash grexes (pepo and maxima) there. It's surprisingly hard to find really big hubbards etc. I think I'm up to six sources for painted mountain corn now, super interested to strip plant and see how much variation there is in populations. The extra space lets me separate into a gaspe/morden preservation field, a flour field, and a flint field instead of messing with keeping them in corners.

I've been hand-pollinating my c pubescens every morning, it's a lovely ritual and I have some small pods starting. Except for the first few flowers they should all be crossed.

It feels very weird and sad to be doing so little outside. I feel like hoarding my plants and bringing them to the new place, especially with all the space, rather than doing a big garden of any kind here. A row of tomatoes, a row of beans, a row of chard, a row of lettuce or cabbage, a couple squashes-- that seems like whoever ends up here could manage that and not feel overwhelmed. Meanwhile the clover is up and returning some of the bare soil to lawn.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #19 on: 2022-04-30, 07:51:22 PM »
Rototilled a couple hours. Then spread sand on cardboard a couple hours for my wife.

Planted my Salvia carduacea and Salvia columbariae today.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #20 on: 2022-05-01, 10:16:55 AM »
Planted some flat parsley, rosemary and Italian basil yesterday.

Bee balm will be moved to one of my flower planters too.

Keeping strawberry plants where they are.

Hoping for some F. virginiana x F. chiloensis hybrids. The virginiana type is from "Port Huron" - Oikos (Now out of business). My chiloensis type is from native food nursery, set fruits with a single chiloensis plant last year, probably due to F. virginiana.

I will be trying some crosses by hand, I am waiting for F chiloensis to put out more leaves and begin to flower first.

May or may not move some clones into totes to move with me. I'm pretty sure that the wildlife here is also going to spread fruits and hybrids all over the place.

We have crows, pigeons, robins and all sorts of things here. Not to mention groundhogs, moles, rabbits and raccoons.

Alpine strawberries and the other strawberries are favored fruits to many animals.

Cultivating wild species like Potentilla Canadensis and wild spring garlic (the leaves have a garlic taste, small clumping bulbs) is pretty fun.

Moving some ornamental Salvias as well.

I am giving a lot of plants away to people in the area - I had an area set up for pollinators, a lot of people looking to buy the property won't appreciate it.

I am also hoping to send seed out for some of these things as well, I may not be able to plant many things when I first move / some things may not grow in the climate I'm moving to.

I also might try taking some cuttings of a Sambuscus racemosa cuttings out to people.

There is a single specimen growing here with bicolor red / yellow berries. The place I'm moving to is in zone 8, this species maximum heat zone is zone 7 (granted, the area I'm moving to is borderline 7 / 8, it still may grow).

I'm not feeding birds this year, not intentionally at least. Avian flu has appeared in my state as of recently. I don't raise birds, but I don't want to create a bird feeding area. Bird bath may stay inside as well.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #21 on: 2022-05-02, 07:37:19 PM »
Have been sort of cycling through rototilling the tomato isolation gardens. I like to rototill about three times before planting. I have been using the red one because the blue one won't start. I don't think the red one is very good at getting remaining weeds at least not in one pass. I run out of time and patience after about one pass a weekend and don't get back to it till the next weekend. Today I didn't have work so I helped my wife put up a sweet pea fence, helped zip tie the temporary deer fence back up, and then rototilled just a couple of spots where I will ultimately want to plant squash and similar things. One of them was for the first time this year and it wasn't a very good till. I have to work the rest the week. Then I plan to take some time off.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #22 on: 2022-05-03, 05:13:59 PM »
Greenie and Garrett, you both have my sympathies for moving house in the growing season.  Although the plus side may be being able to move some perennials, for sure.

We had reports of avian flu here back in February, and some flocks were lost.  Also still putting out the warning not to approach or handle sick birds.  The nesting season is in full swing here with an almost jungle like sound when you throw in a squirrel or two...  I suspect that Mr. Muggins is raiding nests and that's not a happy thought.  All the birds have looked hale and hearty though until today, I saw a robin definitely not at his best.  Actually looked like something broken, but slowly hopping along.  Feathers a mess too a bit ragged.  So I hope the flu and the squirrels don't ravage our friends too much.  Hope your flock stays safe, Greenie.

Here it's the usual rebuilding and working on expanding my ground.  Built a new bed for peas attached to the tomato bus shelter which is the only thing that didn't blow down in the hurricanes last year.  Still to tack on a trellis for that.  Shored up the others and hoping they will be more secure this time.  Wish I had piglets to till for me, because the old garden is still too rocky for a tiller.  So fork it will be.   Nothing planted there yet, but today I got a beautiful pickup load of horse manure delivered, just wriggling with worms.  It's a bit fresh but will definitely use some of it now at least sparingly to get those worms working where needed, let the rest age for fall.


Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #23 on: 2022-05-04, 09:43:06 AM »
I am not moving until the growing season is pretty much done, but I probably need to end the garden earlier this year to throw grass seed and whatever else down.

Moved the trellis and a few other things into one smaller area, converting herb beds into raised beds this year as they are decent sized. Growing some things in totes as well.

Trellis helps a lot with saving space - probably only doing cucamelons and cucumbers - maybe beans up it this year.

Might till a very small area - or lay cardboard down next to everything else just to kill roots and grass.

Steph S

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #24 on: 2022-05-04, 03:24:07 PM »
Well I found the poor robin dead today, keeled over next to one of my raised beds.   I had seen bird flu alerts in the news, so I googled and found the number to call, our wildlife gov folks are asking anyone to report dead birds, then they collect and test them.  They came in a couple of hours and picked up the bird, but meanwhile I had been over to work on my new/old garden and found a load of feathers on one corner of the compost pile there.  The big feathers pretty sure it was robin.  So I think this bird had a bad encounter with the squirrel or maybe some other predator, and then died of the injuries.  Very sad, but better than bird flu.  Anyway they will test for it to be sure.  I asked him about the status of the outbreak of late, and he said they get the occasional positive test but mostly negative.   So thankfully there doesn't seem to be a major outbreak at present but they are continuing to monitor closely with the cooperation of the public.
I am really glad that we have a government that puts money behind this kind of important work. 

Greenie DeS

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #25 on: 2022-05-05, 07:06:13 AM »
Roofers are gone and I've had perfect hardening-off weather: overcast, a tiny bit of rain, not generally too windy. Worked most of the plants up to six hours at a time already. I need to be gone for a day this weekend so I guess they'll stay inside for that, we're still frosty at night.

My friend in town is also moving, I visited him and liberated some suckers of what I believe to be a gallica rose: super multipetalled, unbelievably fragrant, repeats, foliage *not* rugose. Pretty sure it's been there at least 50 years, if not longer: it's formed quite a thicket. Very glad I got a piece.

The avian flu is in the next town over, it makes me nervous.

Still need to take my tiller in and get it looked at. Some small engine repair knowledge would have served me well. The pigs are still in that field though, so until the butcher comes on the 14th I can't get into it anyways.

Rhubarb is just starting to come up and haskap buds to unfurl. Plum buds are swelling but not yet open. The aspens put out a bumper crop of catkins this year, I guess they liked our hot summer last year.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #26 on: 2022-05-08, 05:03:49 AM »
Probably going to start direct sowing some more things today, also going to start planting out some stuff.

Temps don't go below 40 - 45F according to the forecasts. Everyone else here just planted their tomatoes like a week ago - I should hurry up and do so as well.

Because I am mostly growing in planters this year, I am thinking of putting S. habrochaites on the borders of bins / beds - same with related things.

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #27 on: 2022-05-10, 03:10:47 PM »
Got a lot of rototilling to do before average last frost on Sunday. Ran out of gas so need to get some more. Kind of the final round of rototilling for many of the gardens. Though there are some garden spaces that could use a lot more rototilling especially if I want space for squashes and such.

Also shoveling sand and compost around mostly for my wife who is growing cut flowers.
« Last Edit: 2022-05-10, 09:12:20 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William Schlegel

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #28 on: 2022-05-12, 06:27:28 PM »
Done shoveling sand and compost as of yesterday.

Rototilled for a good while today.

Planted Montana Morado Maize, sunflowers including Lofthouse's strain of giant and Arikara, and a mix of cucumbers including Lofthouse, a couple years of home saving 17 and 19 and a couple new to me varieties. I think the 17 and 19 seed didn't look that great. I remember bringing some very overripe lemon cucumbers home to seed save last year but I didn't find it if I got any seed out of them.

Yesterday I planted moschata and pepo squashes.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Andrew Barney

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Re: Garden Journal
« Reply #29 on: 2022-05-12, 06:46:14 PM »
Family has been in quarantine since friday. Think I'm finally the last to get "the COVID".  :( My throat is killing me.

Planted some pluerry and peach-nectarine hybrid pits that were in the freezer. Also planted several species of Mertensia bluebell seeds that were also in the freezer, most of them native to Colorado. Hopefully they germinate fine.

Huckleberry Gold potatoes look to be thriving. Also have lots of little TPS seedlings sprouting. The native wax currant has lots of flowers on it and the Rubus deliciosus bush has lots of flowers, though no genetically diverse pollen to set fruit with.

The peas seem to be doing well. My "large podded" group has extra large leaves and they are extra tender leaves, compared to most of the others

My one test seedling of my alcohol treated Hopi Black Squash Moshata is growing. Plan to grow it in a pot and self fertilize it to save the variety from extinction. I am one of two who have very old seeds for it. Plan to send seeds to Baker Creek and EFN if successful. I only have 10 more seeds.