Author Topic: Pea Soup Recipes  (Read 331 times)

Andrew Barney

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Pea Soup Recipes
« on: 2022-02-25, 09:36:15 PM »
A few days ago I made my first pea soup from scratch using whole peas.

I'm still a bit confused as to the difference between these types, but basically they are all starchy peas and some take longer to soak and cook than others. Some might have higher starch or protein content than others. Some might be better at making their own gravy than others.

Field peas
Gray peas
Marrowfat peas
Maple peas
Yellow / Green whole / split peas

But anyway, I took a bunch of random discarded unknown peas from my collection that I don't have room to screen and evaluate. I figured I'd try eating them. If i had to describe what most of them are I'd say gray peas / maple peas.

I used Soren's 1847 recipe for traditional Danish pea soup written by Madam Mangor. Despite soren's lovely picture of his peas, I suspect what he has are actually Marrowfat peas and might be tastier and have more gel than grey peas.

https://toads.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/grey-peas/

https://da.wikisource.org/wiki/Mangors_Kogebog_for_smaa_huusholdninger/Supper#Graae_.C3.86rter

Here is the recipe:

Quote
Gray Peas
The peas are peeled, rinsed clean and put in cold water with a little soda in the evening. The next day they are boiled in the same water, which must stand round over them when put on the fire. They are boiled evenly with the lid on for 2 to 3 hours, skimmed, but not stirred until they are tender, then come a little bay leaves, some anchovies, which are scraped from the legs and chopped with a knife, and salt on it. Butter is browned in a saucepan, in which flour, a good portion of [stock], some soy, vinegar and sugar are boiled. When this has boiled a little, put it in the peas and cook well with them. If you do not have enough [stock], you can cook some Bone, Pork or Meat in the peas. It is not necessary for the peas to stand in water overnight, when on the same day as they were to be boiled, they are put in the morning in so much boiling water with soy in it that this stands over them. They are hereby covered until the water is drawn into them, then once more boiling water is poured on them. They are put on the fire with so much cold water that it stands round over them, and become tender at the same time as otherwise. ½ Otting Peas is for 6 People.

I realized this was using a sort of roux gravy. So I found a recipe for a traditional Danish roux.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctpom-Qkhks

Traditional Danish Brown Gravy - "Brun Sovs" from Denmark

Quote
Ingredients, sauce for 4 persons:
2 tbsp all-purpose flour
60 grams butter (salted preferably)
0.5 litre of stock (vegetable, meat .... up to you)
1 bay leaf
food coloring (we call it "madkulør" in Denmark) - just for coloring no taste (replaced with soy sauce as suggested in the 1847 recipe)
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar (replaced with malt vinegar)
0.5 tsp sugar
salt & pepper

I Cooked the peas and made the roux and mixed them together. The peas were actually very tasty. The peas themselves very starchy like a potato and needed the sauce for sure! Next time I would blend the peas and strain them for a creamy sauce. Maybe some cream to add to it. The bay leaves added a really nice flavor too!

Andrew Barney

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  • Koppen zone: Dfc / Dfb
  • Hardiness Zone: 5b
Re: Pea Soup Recipes
« Reply #1 on: 2022-04-19, 01:04:39 PM »
Not quite pea soup recipe, but not sure where else to share it.

Soy free soy sauce recipe by using yellow peas instead of soy beans.

from the book:

René Redzepi - The Noma Guide to Fermentation (2018)