Author Topic: Warm Weather Peas  (Read 131 times)

Jeremy Weiss

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Warm Weather Peas
« on: 2022-01-07, 08:56:52 PM »
Hi all,

Does anyone know how far south/warm climate peas can get (Note I am talking about Pisum peas, not Cow peas).  In the last couple of years, the climate in our area has not been all that conducive to peas, since we go very quickly from freezing to boiling.  Up until now, I've been trying to solve this with a semi-wild kind of pea I got from India that grows super quickly (about 45 days seed to seed). But this one isn't all that good for much of anything else, as it's also super duper small in plant, pod and seed (the pods are only about a third of the size of a "normal" pea pod).

So I am interested in peas that are from VERY far south, in the hopes that these might be better able to handle hot weather.  Just getting them from tropical places doesn't always work (since, if you go far enough south, peas go from a crop grown in the spring to one grown over the winter, so again, cooler weather).

So far, the farthest south I have been able to find is peas from the south of Italy. I've tried Roveja (which didn't work all that well) and Piselle d' la Ago (Which DID kind of work, but I lost the whole crop to critters on year and haven't been able to get replacement seed.)

So does anyone know any further south. Greece?, Africa?   

William S.

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #1 on: 2022-01-08, 02:29:34 AM »
Native Seed Search offers heirloom peas from various indigenous groups in the southwest. Grown during the winter there.

https://www.nativeseeds.org/collections/peas
« Last Edit: 2022-01-08, 03:04:07 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

galina gardiner

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #2 on: 2022-01-08, 11:07:53 AM »
Mangetouts are quicker than shelling peas. 

The one of Kapuler's peas that apparently does well in Hawaii is Opal Creek.  I am not growing in the South, I can however report that Opal Creek does go well into hotter summer weather when others perish.  Unfortunately it is not very fast maturing. 

Vesa Tee

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #3 on: 2022-01-09, 12:18:56 AM »
Below study seems to suggesting that pea varieties with longer flowering time and higher pod numbers would make better in hot climate.

https://www.agronomy.org/news/science-news/peas-it-hot/
https://acsess.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.2135/cropsci2016.12.0974

Adrian

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #4 on: 2022-01-09, 04:50:33 AM »
The wrinkled peas is more resistant at the heat.We use kelvedon for the spring grow.
Unfortunately he was breed in united kingdom.I don't think if it sufficient for your climate.

I think the sugar rate can help the peas to resist at the heat.
It may a good idea to cross kelvedon with climbing peas.
« Last Edit: 2022-01-09, 06:09:19 AM by Adrian »

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #5 on: 2022-01-09, 08:28:45 AM »
Well, that might explain why the Ago did a little better; it's wrinkled (actually, it's kind of a weird looking pea; it's the only one I have ever seen that was wrinkled AND marmorated.)

Steph S

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #6 on: 2022-01-09, 06:41:13 PM »
I read somewhere that tall peas have more heat tolerance than shorter peas.
That being said, I noticed a lot of variation in heat tolerance, in my trials this past summer, and whether they were short or tall did not seem to be key.
King Tut, Calvert, Biskopens, Shiraz, Tai Chung are some that didn't seem to suffer from the heat.

I was recently reading about genetic diversity in peas, and they found there is not such a huge bottleneck in peas compared to other crops, as there is a lot of genetic diversity in the reservoir of Asian peas.   Perhaps you should seek some cultivars from Southern China?

Ferdzy

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Re: Warm Weather Peas
« Reply #7 on: 2022-01-14, 09:37:50 AM »
The most heat tolerant pea we have grown is Spanish Skyscraper, a fairly rare Canadian heirloom. It is a large, late pea. The nice thing about it is if it gets too hot, and your fresh peas are going tough even as they ripen, they are very good as dried peas too.

We have approached the problem from a different angle. We plant the 2 earliest peas we know of, Strike and Knight (Strike is a little the earlier; Knight is a better pea, both are 55 to 60 days to maturity for us.) They get planted as soon as the ground can be worked - prior to April 1st or it won't work - and ripped out by July 1st. They all come ripe within about 2 weeks, and we use these for freezing for the winter. Then we plant the fastest ripening dry bush beans (any with 90 days to maturity) and get a second crop. We expect to need to cover the peas through the first month with plastic and hoops. You need 150 frost-free days to pull this off.