Author Topic: Craig LeHoullier  (Read 125 times)

William S.

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Craig LeHoullier
« on: 2021-12-25, 01:36:08 PM »
I just got Craig's book for Christmas Epic Tomatoes. Just started reading it. I've gradually been learning more about him. Read a couple blog posts. Following him on Instagram. Watched a youtube video. Even emailed him once with a question. Seems pretty cool and he is an originator of the Dwarf tomato project. Which is a major source of OSSI registered tomato varieties.

http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=168.msg1736#msg1736

http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=404.0
« Last Edit: 2021-12-25, 04:18:50 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Nicollas

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Re: Craig LeHoullier
« Reply #1 on: 2021-12-25, 11:31:15 PM »
Smart breeding project. I feel similar vibes on the promiscous tomates project

Roland

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Re: Craig LeHoullier
« Reply #2 on: 2021-12-26, 12:21:04 PM »
I got the book Epic Tomatoes in summer 2021. Cant wait for his book about the dwarf tomatoes. Hope there is some information about genetics and segregation of the F2.

William S.

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Re: Craig LeHoullier
« Reply #3 on: 2021-12-26, 02:17:08 PM »
Smart breeding project. I feel similar vibes on the promiscous tomates project

One thing that occurs to me is the potential to cross the promiscuous project plants with the dwarfs and microdwarfs. There really is no need for anything to be entirely separate in the tomato world. Promiscuous project, micro dwarf project, Late Blight Project, colorful tasty early tomatoes can all be sought somewhat in parallel but with crosses possible.

Regarding that last category: the dearth of short season tomatoes with fun colors, patterns, and tastes. I know from my experience with Krainiy Sever that a dwarf can be decently short season. I direct seeded it in 2017. It worked and kept the fruit off the ground. So the potential for not just more diversity in short season tomatoes is there but in self supporting short season tomatoes with colorful and varied fruit. Most of the existing dwarf project plants are bred for longer growing seasons. So I really want to know what is possible if you say cross in an ultra early like Sweet Cherriette.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-27, 12:15:28 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days