Author Topic: Rangi  (Read 231 times)

Richard Watson

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Rangi
« on: 2021-12-16, 11:33:20 PM »
Rangi was a cross between Tom's yellow wonder and Beryl beauty, in the first F1 two distinctive traits showed up, a regular leaf large yellow fruit that was poor tasting and a mid to large red fruit regular leaf with amazing rich flavour. The photo shows the F3 from the red fruit, there are five plants, two have small fruit, one on the left mid size. The middle plant which has two stems with the two ripening fruit and its other stem to it left is a very productive plant. It will come down to taste as to whither I split this F3 into two, all depends if the small fruit plants have better flavour, if they are no better than the large I wont and instead just save from the productive plant only.
Great to be just days away from the first tomatoes of the summer
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #1 on: 2021-12-17, 12:01:07 AM »
Now is Beryl beauty an OSSI dwarf? Wait I can Google that. Photo upload retry?
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #2 on: 2021-12-17, 12:19:35 AM »
The photo I had was slightly too big, I'll redo a new photo tomorrow
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #3 on: 2021-12-17, 09:17:10 PM »
No matter how small the photo, it wont load. and its the same size as the lily photo
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #4 on: 2021-12-17, 09:46:27 PM »
I struggle sometimes with photos on here.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Roland

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #5 on: 2021-12-18, 11:43:19 AM »
U got 2 types of F1?
A yellow F1
A red F1

Strange, i guess the red F1 have a different pollenparent as the yellow F1.

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #6 on: 2021-12-18, 11:57:36 AM »
U got 2 types of F1?
A yellow F1
A red F1

Strange, i guess the red F1 have a different pollenparent as the yellow F1.

Pollen was taken from Toms yellow wonder for both, I'm picking the red is a genetic throw back.
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #7 on: 2021-12-18, 12:24:37 PM »
I've havent yet managed to make a cross with a green when ripe like Beryl Beauty. Wonder if it could be the source of the red?

Genetically this reminds me of a process by which two modified pathways can restore a complete pathway. So if the yellow parent has part of what it takes to make lycopene and the green parent has the other part the result could be lycopene.

Also flavor wise it is an interesting story. Not all yellow tomatoes taste good. However when they taste good they can sometimes taste better.

The XL red strain in Josephs promiscuous project can taste really good for a red.

I do still like red tomatoes though I am conflicted because some of the other colors like bicolors and oranges are so good. I do like variety too.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #8 on: 2021-12-18, 04:49:38 PM »
Ive always liked some of the green fleshed fruit, Grubs Mystery green has been my families top tasting, Beryl Beauty is not far behind.
I need to look on Tomatoville to see how far back there was a red variety that lead up to Beryl Beauty's.
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #9 on: 2021-12-18, 08:53:12 PM »
So Golden Dwarf Champion was crossed with Green Giant and created Sneezy from which Beryl and Jade beauty were selected. Dwarf Champion is a yellow fruit so no red fruit involved there, cant find any info on its breeding but it seems to be a heirloom that dates back many years. same with Green Giant, cant anything about it apart from
Quote
accidental development because it was an unexpected potato leafed plant grown in amongst an (unspecified) Regular Leafed green cultivar by Reinhart Kraft in 2004 (hence the Open Pollinated designation).
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #10 on: 2021-12-18, 09:11:02 PM »
Any red tomatoes nearby that might have contributed some pollen?

I'm curious as to how the bicolor trait works. Because it seems to produce some lycopene in the red spots. Some of the greens work that same way.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-18, 09:13:21 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Richard Watson

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #11 on: 2021-12-18, 09:26:47 PM »
I did the cross inside my tunnelhouse which was only the two varieties, I remember Craig LeHoullier didn't seem surprised a red showed up in that crossed

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=43249
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #12 on: 2021-12-18, 11:44:29 PM »
I can't see that tomatoville thread. However I was reading some of Craig's blog annual reports and was surprised at some of the things that went sideways on some of the stabilizing lines. Interesting. We need a tomato genetics book.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Rangi
« Reply #13 on: 2021-12-19, 11:07:46 AM »
https://allabouttomatoplant.blogspot.com/2014/04/genetic-control-of-fruit-color-in.html

http://kdcomm.net/~tomato/Tomato/mutant.html

Useful info.

I think;

"Gdf
Gold Fleck
---
color

Small dark green spots on immature fruit, do not rupture but turn yellow on ripe fruit."

Is showing up in my garden a fair amount. Maybe due to Brad parentage.

Though I haven't finished the article but perhaps it may have some explanation for this reappearance of red.

One phenomenon could be frameshift mutations. A mutation shifts the frame another shifts it back. Then red comes back.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-19, 11:19:27 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days