Author Topic: Lardizabalaceae  (Read 408 times)

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Lardizabalaceae
« on: 2021-09-23, 07:21:49 PM »
I am planning on starting some Lardizabalaceae breeding next year (2022).

I mainly want to perform some interfamilial hybrids.

This entire family appears to have an edible gel - Akebia skins are sometimes cooked.


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-sneaky-life-of-the-worlds-most-mysterious-plant
https://nautil.us/issue/104/harmony/plants-feel-pain-and-might-even-see?

Boquila trifoliolata, is apparently able to mimic spines on leaves - leaf shape / size etc. I am unsure if it will mimic colors as well. It has also mimicked plastic plants.



Akebia species - also referred to as "Chocolate Vines" are quite cold hardy, also have a large number of species compared to the rest of the Family. Some species are hardy down to Zones 6 - 8.

Akebia quinata is supposedly hardy down to Zone 4.


The Holboellia genus also has quite a few species - I will be mentioning Holboellia latifolia which many sources say is hardy down to Zone 6. The fruits themselves appear to be large than those of Akebia.


Stauntonia has a few interesting species - one of them is said to taste like "honey", fruits are a decent enough size. Stauntonia hexaphylla appears to be the easiest species to get ahold of.


Lardizabala biternata (The only plant in it's genus) is from Chile, just like Boquila trifoliolata. The fruit is called Zabala fruit in English.


Decaisnea insignis is another possibly monotypic species. Also known as "Dead Man's Fingers", it is eaten in Nepal and China. This is the only "shrub" in the entire family.



All or most of these species most have their "gel" eaten and the seeds removed.

If smaller seeds could be selected for, straining them out may become a solution for commercial use.

Banana, honey, melon and other flavors have been described within the family.

Having an aromatic, cold hardy - ornamental crop could become a new source of income for people in colder climates as well. Leaf mimicry could work out in some different situations as well.

The family has species from: South America - Asia, and a few other regions. Being able to hybridize these species could unlock new flavors, disease resistances, pest resistances and allow the crops to grow in new locations.


I am working on getting seeds for some of these species.

I will be growing Lardizabala biternata and Boquila trifoliolata indoors. Bought them from Wanderlust Nursery and Far Reaches Farm.

Monrovia sells Holboellia latifolia and I am not seeing any sort of patent on the variety, but - they appear to have stopped shipping online (At least for now?). Same story with their listing of Holboellia coriacea - not hardy in my zone, could try to mulch it.

JoyCreekNursery sells Holboellia angustifolia var. angustifolia and Holboellia coriacea. Both are hardy to Zone 7, if I am buying these and mulching them - I want them to establish their root systems. I will probably until next year before I consider purchasing them. Holboellia coriacea says "out of stock" - next crop in 2022. Holboellia angustifolia has around 20+ plants still in stock, not a good sign this late in the season.

Far Reaches Farm sells Decaisnea fargesii CDHM 14633 - it is currently out of stock, I should have bought it earlier in the year. Appears to have larger fruit than the commonly sold type. Also a clone, unsure if the fruit size is stable.

If I am able to find any other species, I will try and grow them as well. I would prefer to grow mostly cold hardy species as I do not have access to a greenhouse (Rather not use the house as one...).
« Last Edit: 2021-09-23, 07:45:09 PM by Garrett Schantz »

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #1 on: 2021-09-23, 08:06:02 PM »
Unsure of chromosome counts either.

Might have to do some research or ask researchers if they know any of the chromosome counts.

Chemicals will probably be needed for any interfamilial hybrids.

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #2 on: 2021-09-23, 09:05:08 PM »
Boquila trifoliolata is now showing as Out Of Stock on Far Reaches Farm. Not surprising - pretty hard to obtain outside of labs.

I originally got an email saying that the species was back in stock on June 29th 2021. I waited a day, went to order it. The plant was Out Of Stock.

I got an email today at 5:04 PM, ordered at 7:02 PM. Now, at 10:58 PM, the plants are shown as Out Of Stock.

If the plant is Self Compatible and survives for me, I can send seed out to people interested in working with it at some point. Unless someone ordered a bunch of plants and they can't fulfill my order...


Diane Whitehead

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 272
  • Karma: 26
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #3 on: 2021-09-24, 10:18:02 AM »
Lardizabala     x=7
L biternata  2n=28

Akebia  x=8
A.quinata  2n=32
A. lobata (trifoliata)  2n=32

Decaisnea  x=15
D. fargesi   2n=30
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #4 on: 2021-09-24, 10:22:49 AM »
Lardizabala     x=7
L biternata  2n=28

Akebia  x=8
A.quinata  2n=32
A. lobata (trifoliata)  2n=32

Decaisnea  x=15
D. fargesi   2n=30

Thanks, not the most favorable chromosome counts to work with, but nice to have them available. Probably going to end up with a lot of sterile plants when I finally get around to attempting these crosses.

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #5 on: 2021-09-24, 10:36:04 AM »
Planning on doing some experiments with Boquila trifoliolata as well.

Going to do some testing with it using:

Solanum habrochaites

Solanum quitoense

Coffea arabica

Tradescantia zebrina

Phaseolus acutifolius var. latifolius: Santa Catalina Wild Tepary

Cucumis melo / sativus

Solanum pachyandrum

Solanum sisymbriifolium


Mostly wanting to see how well the plant can copy leaf colors, density as well as thorns and trichomes.
« Last Edit: 2021-10-06, 08:47:44 PM by Garrett Schantz »

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #6 on: 2021-10-06, 08:48:49 PM »
Boquila trifoliolata arrived earlier today.

The leaves currently on it are about the size of oregano leaves.

J Hunch

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #7 on: 2021-12-22, 04:19:37 PM »
That mimic plant is fascinating. Has it changed in the time since it arrived?

Garrett Schantz

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 499
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • Email
  • Koppen zone: Dfa
  • Hardiness Zone: USDA zone 6
Re: Lardizabalaceae
« Reply #8 on: 2021-12-23, 07:14:04 AM »
That mimic plant is fascinating. Has it changed in the time since it arrived?

Mine is dying, appears to have gotten too cold I'm the house a few too many times. Hopefully it recovers.