Author Topic: 2021 Corn  (Read 435 times)

William S.

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2021 Corn
« on: 2021-08-27, 08:11:01 PM »
I have done a bad job growing corn in 2021. I planted one patch of a single variety of flour corn from Baker Creek from a Bozeman MT corn breeder. It seems fine. Already picked five ears.

Then I planted a flint corn grex field. It is very stunted. Might get a few ripe ears.

Same with the sweet corn.

Corn definitely needs to be planted and weeded a bit more carefully. Oh well. I might get some small amount of interesting genetics from it.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #1 on: 2021-08-28, 04:20:00 PM »
Still better than mine. Mine is still barely up to my mid calf, and shows no signs of getting any bigger (or making tassels or ears). I looks like I just forgot to move the lawn for a month or so.

William S.

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #2 on: 2021-08-28, 09:57:40 PM »
Yeah, one of my biggest mistakes was not using my garden seeder for it. I hand sowed it way too thick. If I had used the seeder like last year it would have grown way better. Also did not help that I didn't ever get it hoed that one critical time. The Canada thistle is very happy with that. Had to take an online class- critical for the teaching degree. Bad for the garden though on top of working full time all summer!

The neat thing is I think I'll get some small amount of highly selected by survival of the fittest seed back from the two grex patches. One sweet corn plant in particular is huge and has one large ear of corn. Undoubtedly Josephs genetics but I am saving that ear for seed! Maybe there is hope for breeding corn for sloppy gardeners.
« Last Edit: 2021-08-28, 10:00:33 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #3 on: 2021-08-28, 11:07:46 PM »
My base problem is sort of that I didn't hand sow it AT ALL, or more accurately, that I didn't direct sow it. I was so sick of the squirrels and chipmunks simply eating all of the seed as soon as I sowed I did everything in plugs and then transplanted it when the seed food was all used up. That worked as far as keeping the animals from eating it, but really messed up the root systems (which is probably why it's so short). 

reed

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #4 on: 2021-08-29, 01:12:21 AM »
I always hand sow corn and have found in recent years it works well to do little as far as soil prep and to sow thick. I basically neglect it for the first two or three weeks at which time the corn is barely visible in the weeds. That's when I go through and pull the weeds, thin the corn and use it all for mulch between the rows. The puny little corn plants then explode into growth. The weeds I think work as camouflage, protecting the seed and seedlings from critters, especially chipmunks that otherwise would have swiped the seed and birds that otherwise would have pulled up the seedlings. Has been working great the last few seasons for up to 500 plants but since I do it all by hand would not be viable on a much large scale.
 

Greenie DeS

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #5 on: 2021-11-24, 03:37:04 PM »
Finally wrote up my extreme northern corn (small) variety trial, figured I'd put it in here. I'd be happy for any other very short, very very cool-tolerant variety recommendations (Gaspe was the only one that really ripened off comfortably here)

Gaspe from Heritage Harvest seeds- this was my second year growing it. In 2020 I tried starting indoors and transplanted, which it didn't like, and spaced it a foot apart, which meant it didn't pollinate. In 2021 I put it on a dry sunny hill crest direct-planted with soaked seed and it went in May 26 and was mature Sept 7. I needed to have watered it more, it dried down to wilt stage several times. It was not complete full sun but it was close, and as warm as it gets. Second year I spaced it 2 seeds per hole in a 6" grid. I think one seed per 6", or maybe one seed per 6x12" space, would be good. I did increase my seed supply at least. Definitely a landrace variability to these plants.

Cascade Ruby-Gold from PR seeds- this was my first year growing it, soaked it like Gaspe and planted it about the same time but it never got more than a foot tall. It was in slight shade and I later realized there were a ton of aspen roots in that bed stealing moisture, could use a second try I guess. I'm hoping it has cool-weather resistance.

Mandan parching lavender from adaptive seeds - this was a very short plant that started out promising: early vegetative growth, lots of tillering. It was slower to tassel and never ripened even into milk stage though. It did get a touch of shade but it was right next to starburst mana and there was a distinct difference in ripeness. Not to grow again. Again presoaked. The plant was so happy, I'm sad about this.

Starburst mana and magic mana from snake river and adaptive seeds - the starburst mana was definitely quicker to ripen but I got some cobs off both. I think I'll order some more starburst mana and some magic mana from snake river, since theirs seemed earlier, to supplement my saved seed. Again seed was presoaked and then direct seeded. Nothing got fully dry-ripe but some made it past milk stage and were dried in the carport, I should run a germination test on them. What I got will definitely have come through a strong selection event.


To try 2022:

Gaspe, starburst mana, magic mana, and cascade ruby gold again, including a reorder from Snake River seeds.

Maybe Advent Gulch Blue from Snake River seeds, it's longer season but apparently good in cold? Probably won't work though but I'm curious.

Saskatoon (not Saskatchewan) white from Adaptive Seeds. A good bet.

Morden, if I can find it. Also a good bet.

Ki:kam hu:n from Native Seed Search. No idea how well this will work.

Alberta Clipper and maybe Darwin John from Oikos. Probably longshots.

Maybe Baxter's Yellow from Sandhill. Longshot.

Rumour of a small blue corn sold through a museum gift shop to track down.

William S.

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #6 on: 2021-11-24, 07:59:00 PM »
https://www.furtrade.org/store/index.php?route=product/category&path=70

No blue corn in Stock at the moment. They offer it though periodically.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Greenie DeS

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #7 on: 2021-11-25, 09:41:06 AM »
https://www.furtrade.org/store/index.php?route=product/category&path=70

No blue corn in Stock at the moment. They offer it though periodically.

Well, that was easier than expected. Thank you!

Diane Whitehead

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #8 on: 2021-11-25, 12:48:27 PM »
Are you wanting sweet corn?

Yukon Supreme 49 days  bred in Alaska
Orchard Baby - small cobs

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Greenie DeS

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #9 on: 2021-11-25, 04:46:50 PM »
In order to save seed they need to be able to dry down in my climate. 49 days to maturity might do that! I tend not to eat a lot of sweet corn but this might be fun to play with.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #10 on: 2021-11-25, 08:34:17 PM »
Sweet corn seed is viable about 17 days after pollination. The earliest fresh eating stage is at about 25 days. So, by the time it's ready to eat, it's ready for seed saving.


Greenie DeS

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #11 on: 2021-11-26, 11:59:56 AM »
Sweet corn seed is viable about 17 days after pollination. The earliest fresh eating stage is at about 25 days. So, by the time it's ready to eat, it's ready for seed saving.

Oh, that is excellent news! Thank you.

reed

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #12 on: 2021-11-26, 03:25:28 PM »
I'm not sure where to track it down but Blue Jade is a great little sweet corn. I believe it originated in the North East. Seed Saves Exchange used to carry it, not sure if they do anymore. In my climate in SE Indiana, it is the only one of those early corns that did much of anything for me. Those like Yukon Supreme matured at about a foot tall and made little bitty ears with few kernels. I think corn needs a certain quantity of heat units to mature and in my climate, they got it in about a week and a half.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #13 on: 2021-11-26, 07:06:59 PM »

Sandhill Preservation Center has 173 kinds of corn.  I skimmed through them, and there is one more that you haven't included in your list -

Altagold:  Truly suited for a northern short season climate.

      https://www.sandhillpreservation.com/corn

Diane
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cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Diane Whitehead

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Re: 2021 Corn
« Reply #14 on: 2021-11-26, 07:10:33 PM »

Reed,

There are three companies in Canada that sell Blue Jade corn seeds:

La ferme coopérative Tourne-Sol,  La Societe des plantes,  Prairie Garden Seeds

Of course, it is very tricky getting seeds into the U.S. and most foreign companies won't do it.

Diane
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil