Author Topic: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes  (Read 153 times)

William S.

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Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« on: 2021-08-06, 07:19:27 PM »
I planted a garden in the Vegas area awhile back in the winter. They have some heat tolearnt varieties in the garden centers there. Given this year's heat wave. I wonder if it might be useful to delve into some of those genotypes a bit.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #1 on: 2021-08-07, 05:22:02 AM »
I'd be very interested to hear about these.
Heat is more devastating to tomato fruit set than cold, especially in the ones we've been selecting for cold tolerance.
I see definite trends as well in the susceptibility to foliar diseases which are different in cold vs hot weather.
The plants here are getting it coming and going.  ::)  Extreme temperature swings are becoming the norm.

William S.

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #2 on: 2021-08-07, 07:16:43 AM »
https://bonnieplants.com/product-tag/heat-tolerant/

https://ofags.com/heat-tolerant-tomato-varieties/

Yellow Pear (both lists), Green Zebra are a couple already in my collection. Joseph''s cross between Yellow Pear and Brad would be one example of material that might be good for this. Though my lone green zebra is still pretty small after the frost and I'm not sure what is going on with the Brad x yellow Pear.

There is a large grow out of Joseph's promiscuous project in my garden. Some of them have a lot of fruit. Some individual plants in the slushy garden have a lot.

Earls strain of Jagodka looks great for instance. Frozen then regrew and now is covered in fruit and it's ripening. I keep meaning to try to relocate Joseph's strain of Jagodka in the row. They seem to be two different varieties. If I was much interested in boring red tomatoes I would cross them together.

« Last Edit: 2021-08-07, 07:22:10 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #3 on: 2021-08-07, 08:20:36 AM »
Funny that YP and GZ are both tomatoes with a very bad taste reputation.  But IDK, so much depends on your climate and soil conditions, maybe they do taste good in some conditions.
Interesting that there are multiple Jagodka types out there.   I tried one here, it did not like the cold damp spring weather at all but it did set up a load of the sourest tomatoes I've ever tasted.   A friend sent me seeds of another which I haven't tried yet, she insists that hers are sweet and tasty.
I've actually been thinking about those sour tomatoes and wondering if I shouldn't find or develop something that would stand in as a substitute for lemons. 
In my greenhouse environment I've seen some surprising heat tolerance in Stupice and its descendants with regards to fruit setting up against the glass where everything normally burns and dies.  The PI120256 lines have promising heat setting tolerance as well, but they also have some Stupice lineage. 
The Rodney F5 line I'm growing this year is unrelated, but has surprised me by showing resistance to the mites and blights of hot humid weather, with better fruit set as a result, compared to other lines.  But it's more susceptible than its cold tolerant cousin lines to the cold wet weather blights when exposed outdoors.  Really surprised to see that heat vs cold either/or in closely related lines.

Steph S

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #4 on: 2021-08-07, 08:25:50 AM »
William, one good thing about selecting for heat tolerance in the promiscuous project, after such a heat wave, every set fruit would apparently have that tolerance.  Can't miss! :)  Great to get some from your slushy garden too where they survived the worst cold.

William S.

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #5 on: 2021-08-07, 09:43:59 AM »
William, one good thing about selecting for heat tolerance in the promiscuous project, after such a heat wave, every set fruit would apparently have that tolerance.  Can't miss! :)  Great to get some from your slushy garden too where they survived the worst cold.

Hmm I actually suspect I can miss. Most of the promiscuous project seems to lack a trait or two I want. Like exserted stigmas. So I've marked a very low number of plants with two blue flags. So far anyway.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Steph S

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #6 on: 2021-08-07, 12:12:34 PM »
Hmm I actually suspect I can miss. Most of the promiscuous project seems to lack a trait or two I want. Like exserted stigmas. So I've marked a very low number of plants with two blue flags. So far anyway.
If there are plants you know set merrily away during the heat wave, you could save them for a heat tolerance project instead. 

William S.

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Re: Heat Tolerant Tomatoes
« Reply #7 on: 2021-08-07, 12:29:34 PM »
If there are plants you know set merrily away during the heat wave, you could save them for a heat tolerance project instead.

I just did a round of picking for seed. I got a sandwich bag of mixed early promiscuous otherwise not selected, so if they have seeds in them I'll have saved something.

Other things I have gotten fruit from for the seed saving pile.

Sweet cherriette shortest season tomato and my standard for that.
Early bicolor promiscuous first fruit no seeds in LA2329 crossing block
Other LA2329 crossing block promiscuous tomato
Pinnochio micro dwarf new to my garden
Earl''s jagodka a past top performer for earliness.
Sungold F4- may be red- often performs very well.
Mission Mountain Sunrise- my creation not yet released
Gold Pearl- very small plants but non rugose new to me
Coyote- past top performer and a tasty small cherry
Krainy Sever (a true rugose dwarf with self supporting stems). Performed very well in 2017.

« Last Edit: 2021-08-07, 12:40:26 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days