Author Topic: Peas 2021  (Read 4935 times)

gmuller

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #45 on: 2021-12-12, 01:45:40 PM »
Flower colour was a bit too complex for my non-existent expertise in reading genetics texts. Great to hear there is a PhD that covers it. My progress has been patchy. The tiny dwarf red snow has failed to thrive despite an extensive growout - many yellowing plants, and patchy seedset. I think I sowed too late, and day length and wet spring have affected growth. Surprisingly, an adjacent row of dwarf Venus= hypertendril yellow snow is thriving. the tall hypertendril yellows are booming.

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #46 on: 2022-02-13, 08:33:28 PM »
The rabbit hole...

Flower colour.
Here’s what I’ve been able to unravel so far:

« Last Edit: 2022-02-13, 08:39:37 PM by B. Copping »

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #47 on: 2022-02-13, 08:40:59 PM »
And my current understanding of pod colour:


B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #48 on: 2022-02-14, 09:06:31 AM »
The only peas I managed to grow in 2021 were some of “Andrew’s Partially Reddish Pods”.
Sown late, in a planter on a balcony, I learned that they are not resistant to powdery mildew.
Not what I wanted to find out, but it is still data. 🙂

Andrew Barney: have you considered incorporating snow or snap varieties into your plant breeding that are known to be resistant to powdery mildew?
Is powdery mildew even a problem in Colorado? (I don’t know your growing environment)

So, this coming spring (barring further disasters) I’ll plant some more.

Steph S

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #49 on: 2022-02-14, 04:05:53 PM »
Wow... thanks for that map of the rabbit hole!   8)

Andrew Barney

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Re: Peas 2021
« Reply #50 on: 2022-02-14, 08:59:24 PM »
Yes, thanks for that! Good to know the dp gene garkens gp. I was actually looking to request an accession of that. Maybe golden sweet has both and that is why it's pods are darker than Opal Creek?

The only peas I managed to grow in 2021 were some of “Andrew’s Partially Reddish Pods”.
Sown late, in a planter on a balcony, I learned that they are not resistant to powdery mildew.
Not what I wanted to find out, but it is still data. 🙂

Andrew Barney: have you considered incorporating snow or snap varieties into your plant breeding that are known to be resistant to powdery mildew?
Is powdery mildew even a problem in Colorado? (I don’t know your growing environment)

So, this coming spring (barring further disasters) I’ll plant some more.

I have not. Powdery mildew is not much of a concern here as the air is of very low humidity most of the year (even the winter). Actually our dry winters is what often kills off trees like stone fruit and others.

Powdery mildew can affect some like squash, but by the time it hits it is late fall and harvest time before winter anyway. So, no it has not been a problem for me, but that is an interesting point of view if i develop anything substantial in the near future that could get grown in more moist or northern climates more than my own. Perhaps I should research which in my collection do have powdery mildew resistance genes.

My red line was crossed most recently with Midnight Snow, which was bred in California. No idea if that line has any powdery mildew resistant genes or not, but they also seem to have a dry climate, so it's possible it does not.

However, I am planning on a new cross with a new line of peas i'm about to receive that is bred from 'Encore', which was developed by Asgrow / Seminis and was specifically selected to have powdery mildew resistance. It was patented, but the patent has recently expired.

I read another recent patented line from Seminis was using Pisum elatius to transfer powdery mildew and another disease resistant gene into domestic peas. I do have F3 'Alaska' x Pisum Elatius hybrids, but i have not planned to do anything with them specifically. They grow fine and nice, can be eaten. But probably could benefit from some edibility genes crossed in. Perhaps I will use my new line crossed to these as well.... hmmm....