Author Topic: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes  (Read 692 times)

William S.

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #15 on: 2021-09-18, 12:13:58 PM »
Hmm, doubt I need to resort to bringing in stems. They detach pretty readily. I'll let them sit awhile. Left a bunch on the plants. It's only the couple or three easterly most clumps producing. Plants on the west end must have been too crowded. Still should be some decent genetics still. Definitely a process of adaptation going on of some kind. I bet this is enough to replace the seed I planted.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #16 on: 2021-09-25, 10:30:44 PM »
I picked some more berries yesterday from the Solanum galapagense LA 1410 that Andrew sent me my starter seed on a few years back. It went well this year I got quite a bit of seed from my ~7 plant clump which grew straight up and was self supporting. It has tiny flowers.

Andrew said he thought we should grow out the seed and distribute it. I said oh no, you would need an ounce. The thing is though you could grow far less because the seed is tiny. Some of it washes through when I try to rinse it. I bought some coffee filters but I forgot them at my parents place. Far better though to slowly rinse the seed by letting it sink and tilting the water out. Not sure how many plants you would need or how big. However I can grow an ounce of seed for a regular tomato variety with maybe ten to twenty plants normally. I suspect a similar ratio might be at play with galapagense for the same number of seeds if not the same weight.

The tiny flowers are a nuisance to work with though. Hardly produce any pollen.

I planted a few seeds the other day. Maybe in a couple months I'll have flowers and can make a cross with the four MMS x BH plants.

If not I have plenty of seed and I plan to surround an exserted stigma plant next year. Ideally a PL MMS x BH F2 but who knows?

Speaking of flowers the ones on the current plants frosted off- but the plants in main were fine. All those hairs may be mechanical frost protection. Intriguing no? The nearby plants were not fine and are about half dead.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #17 on: 2021-09-27, 08:55:56 PM »
I inspected the LA 2329 today. Picked one more berry. Have some seeds drying. Most of the first baggy I now deem not ripe but a few were. There are quite a few on the plants but I think they need some more time. They may not get it.

Still looks like maybe a couple hundred seeds from at least two plants. Interesting. Plants planted out in gardens need more space per plant than potted ones.

Very curious if any of the tomatoes planted in the LA2329 crossing block actually crossed with LA 2329. The bees behavior I observed might indicate crosses will be rare. Hopefully not none existent though! If I don't find any I will surely plant R18 G3 next to LA 2329 next year. It strikes me as having the most habrochaites like flowers of the hybrid lines. I would have this year I think if I could have tasted it in advance.
« Last Edit: 2021-09-27, 09:25:18 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #18 on: 2021-09-30, 05:15:00 AM »
Set the sprinkler on the LA 2329 last night. Hoping it makes it through this mornings frost. Some more berries look close.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Arthropod and Insect Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #19 on: 2021-10-03, 08:31:48 PM »
Picked the remainder of the LA2329 habrochaites berries today. Picked whole clusters hoping for some ripening off the plant. Found a few big ones. One of the biggest pictured. Suspect some are ripe or will ripen thus doubling my numbers or better from the few hundred.
« Last Edit: 2021-10-03, 08:46:04 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days