Author Topic: Walnut species hybridization project  (Read 609 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Walnut species hybridization project
« Reply #15 on: 2020-11-30, 11:28:05 AM »
Just for fun - this doesn't apply to your project.

I am reading A Gardener Touched with Genius, The Life of Luther Burbank by Peter Dreyer.

Beginning in 1877 he hybridized walnuts using more than a dozen species and varieties.

One F1 was partially sterile but its F2s were extraordinarily variable.

"bush-like walnuts from six to eighteen inches in height side by side with trees that have shot up to eighteen or twenty feet; all of the same age and grown from seeds gathered from a single tree.  This rate of growth continues throughout life."
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Dominic J

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Re: Walnut species hybridization project
« Reply #16 on: 2020-12-25, 07:15:01 AM »
Does anyone have any information on triploid walnuts?

I've seen some articles where they want to, and succeed, in creating triploid walnuts. But they don't say *why* they want to do that, or what the results are in terms of fruit bearing. I'm assuming these guys are after the lumber, and not the fruits? Because triploids are generally seedless. For example, one article I read about triploid peaches (or was it cherries?) trying to have pitless fruits just had hollow pitted fruits. But with nut trees, the kernel's what we are after...

In some species, tetraploids have bigger fruits than diploids, in others, they have smaller fruits. Anyone have any insights as far as tetraploid walnuts go?

Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Walnut species hybridization project
« Reply #17 on: 2020-12-25, 09:24:31 AM »
They may also be after the trees themselves, for use in urban settings. Walnuts are considered attractive trees, but the pollen and nuts are considered a detriment in urban settings (pollen to mess up cars, nuts to dent them, and of course, nuts lead to booms in populations of squirrels and other such creatures). Paradox was originally designed as a street tree, from what I have been told (there must be two versions, one sterile, one fertile).

Dominic J

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Re: Walnut species hybridization project
« Reply #18 on: 2020-12-25, 06:33:38 PM »
That's a fair point.