Author Topic: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)  (Read 1127 times)

Ryan M Miller

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Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« on: 2020-11-10, 12:52:41 PM »
A while ago, I read an article on the domestication of intermediate wheatgrass Thinopyrum intermedium for use as a perennial grain crop. Given the fact that the project started in the 1980s and that this plant now has domesticated strains with reduced seed shattering and increased grain size, I've been suspicious that CRISPR technology may have been used. I found one article documenting a few details of the process here: (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1360138520300534). If anybody has any further information on this project, please let me know. I'm hoping that if the domestication process was done without direct gene editing that it could be replicated for other plants, especially other perennial grains.

Note: The parties involved in the domestication project for intermediate wheatgrass seem to have either pattented their strain or applied for PVP under the brand name Kernza. If their procedure does not use CRISPR, then I would prefer if the resulting cultivars from a newly domesticated plant were not pattented to avoid monopolies on the supply of that plant or legal disputes from accidental cross-pollinations.

William S.

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #1 on: 2020-11-10, 01:06:27 PM »
I very much doubt the land institute gene edited Kernza.
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Ryan M Miller

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #2 on: 2020-11-11, 06:41:45 PM »
Whatever techniques were used to accelerate the domestication of intermediate wheatgrass, I'm hoping I can apply them to other promising wild grains. I sure hope William Schlegel was right in assuming that no direct gene editing was used in the domestication programs.

Ryan M Miller

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #3 on: 2020-11-14, 10:45:58 AM »
I found another article documenting the processes used in selection for intermediate wheatgrass grain:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/325062446_Development_and_Evolution_of_an_Intermediate_Wheatgrass_Domestication_Program
The processes described in this article do not include direct gene manipulation. I'm hoping I can figure out how to adapt these methods for other promising wild cereal grains.

William S.

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #4 on: 2020-11-14, 09:16:29 PM »
It's possible that different methods might be possible depending on the ploidy and the grass species, genera, and tribe involved.

Barley and wheat for example even though there is such a thing as aTriteohordeum intergeneric hybrid have very different breeding systems. I'd much rather breed Barley than wheat if I were doing anything particularly modern or fancy with one of them.

« Last Edit: 2020-11-14, 09:19:50 PM by William S. »
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Ryan M Miller

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #5 on: 2020-11-15, 08:55:49 PM »
Given the fact that domesticated barley (Hordeum vulgare) is diploid unlike modern bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) which is hexaploid, I would also much rather prefer to work with barley rather than wheat. As far as I know, the wild grains I'm interested in domesticating using the methods employed by the Land Institute are diploid. This includes little barley (Hordeum pusillum), and maygrass (Phalaris caroliniana). Based on what little I know about genetics, it seems to be easier to breed diploid plants than polyploid plants

By the way, I found another article documenting the methods used by the Land Institute in developing intermediate wheatgrass as a perennial grain. The journal article mentions something called "genomic selection", but I will need to look into the term further to understand what it means or if I need formal training in genetics to understand how to use it. Thankfully, I plan on enrolling in a genetics program at my local community college this Spring. https://2hyzup3gkq37nm98l33j3iwt-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Frontiers-in-Plant-Science-2020-Crain.pdf

Walt

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Re: Intermediate Wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)
« Reply #6 on: 2022-01-19, 11:17:43 AM »
"I used to work at the Land Institute and kept in touch with them until a few years ago'
Google the land institute and you will find links to the publications by their scientists.  Their methods are given in some of their publications.  The last  time I was up to date with them, they were growing many, 1000 or more, and harvesting each seperately.  Thinopyron intermedium is self sterile and wind pollinated.  So the seeds are pollinated by a mix of nearby plants  After harvest, selection is for total seed weight, percent hulless seed.  And maybe a couple other other traits I can't think of right now.
Last I knew, the name Kernza is copyrighted.  You may grow and use it including replanting or selling, or giving, seed.  But the name Kernza is copyrightefd  so you can not call future generations Kernza.  You may mention that it is desended from Kernza.  You should check on this if selling as things may have changed since I have been in touch.