Author Topic: Phaselous Species / Crosses  (Read 2629 times)

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #30 on: 2021-07-02, 10:25:38 PM »
Interesting formation with four branches coming out together.

Some of the branches are flowering stems, which is odd to me. The plant isn't vining too vigorously either.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #31 on: 2021-07-07, 09:31:21 AM »
Seems like a painted lady improved plant - or a hybrid between other runners from last year.

Either way, early flowers - doesn't appear to be branching too much.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #32 on: 2021-09-06, 06:07:43 PM »
Haven't been posting anything bean related due to pest issues this year.

Unsure if the insect in the first image is doing anything, I have saw quite a few of them on the beans though.

The Japanese beetles have been eating the bean's leaves and flowers, causing the plants to wither along with the pods.

I might plant geraniums or find some sort of biological control next year. Last year the beetles targeted feral cherry trees.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #33 on: 2021-10-14, 05:29:04 PM »
Santa Catalina Wild Tepary definitely climbs.

One of it's small pods are visible as well. This is a subspecies from the highlands - probably very little to drought in comparison to normal types.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #34 on: 2021-10-20, 08:44:09 PM »
Going to be trying out a few methods next year for growing beans.

Deer have been eating bean vines - usually the ones that have almost fully mature runner beans (still in green stage).

Growing a few thorny plants next year, could surround the trellis with them on the backside. Although, they probably won't be tall enough to deter deer...

Maybe I could try capsaicin sprays on the parts being eaten? I could try extracting some sort of homemade Polygodial / Capsaicin mixture next year...

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Phaselous Species / Crosses
« Reply #35 on: 2021-10-20, 08:52:24 PM »
Ordered a few beans from Smithstoneseeds.

They do all sorts of seed trades from around the world.

Which means they have a wide assortment of breeding materials... 

Got a bush bean called Schwarzwerder Ausmachbohne - from the Black Forest Region of Germany. Seed coat seems to be nice looking.

Also bought "Uganda Pole Bean". Pods have beans with different coats - I like this trait in beans.

Last bean that I purchased is called "Zimba Tepary Runner" from Zimbabwe.


"This is a zimba runner bean. I was told this is a tepary bean. This interesting looking bean comes from Zimbabwe. I have no other information about this bean. Grows like a bushy runner but instead of thick vines they are small brittle vines and will sprawl out everywhere. Very productive bean."

Any Tepary beans from different countries could add diversity into existing populations.


Edit: They also have a descendent of "Beefy Resilient Grey Pole Bean". This was originally found / created by Carol Deppe - originally thought to be a Phaseolus  acutifolius x Phaseolus vulgaris. Mitla Black is most likely a highly outcrossing common bean rather than a tepary. Black Mitla is said to be drought-resistant and Gaucho is supposedly high yielding. Joseph and a few others seem to have confirmed this on another forum.

Carol expanded and selected from the progeny over five generations before we took on this seed and began cajoling it to adapt even better to our farther north climate.

This is possibly different from the original - being northern adapted works out just fine for me.

Finding or creating a population of common beans that have a tendency to outcross is highly desirable to me.

I may have better luck using runner beans to create domestics with more desirable flowers. I would probably have to select against self-incompatibility if I wanted further crosses with other Vulgaris varieties.

I might be able to grow some beans in pots, try for crosses indoors. I would need a large pot, some beans have huge taproots.

« Last Edit: 2021-10-20, 10:31:12 PM by Garrett Schantz »